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Where Do You Invest Your $10 While Cornering?


hubbard_28
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I went on vacation last week, and had time to sit and read something not medicine or disaster plan related. Twist of the Wrist. I'm not done with it (I WAS on vacation), but as soon as I cracked the book I was hit with the knowledge that I don't even pay attention to what I should be when I'm cornering.

I spent the better part of my first year learning BP. I focus on that still when I'm getting ready to corner, or am actually in the corner. It takes up a lot of my attention, and I know I need to fix it.

I've guestimated that when I'm cornering I put a good $4-5 on how I'm leaning and where my butt is. I'm thinking that is too much. Other things going through my mind are: who's behind me, exiting the corner, where my RP's are, MAN that guys fast, etc.

My question is: how does everyone invest their $10 on cornering (on the track)? Is anyone at the point were BP takes up $1 or less of their attention?

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My question is: how does everyone invest their $10 on cornering (on the track)? Is anyone at the point were BP takes up $1 or less of their attention?

Hub;

IIRC, the first step I take in cornering is to locate my turn point RP; once I have it I get off the seat...a move that has been pounded into my head by Stuman, Lonnie and Tim. These steps happen almost simultaneously and once I am set up, all of my attention goes into 2 (&3) stepping. I can't say that I spend that much time on this part of cornering unless it is a series of connected corners where you have to be dead nuts on to get them all right. The corkscrew at Laguna comes to mind.

 

At least that's how I remember it months removed from the saddle.

 

Kevin

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You've got a good souce of Material in T1 about attention grabbers. Certainly any barrier can be an attention robber.

 

To answer your question about spending <$1 on it, I would say that I do. My BP is a result of the product I want and not the other way round. Perhaps it will work for you if you switch it around in your head. In fact, if you go back and re-read some of your older posts it seems to be a major focus for you (which you've already discovered). You are NOW ready! So pat yourself on the back.

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Good question hub

My attention gets spent on the turnpoint, and onto the two step, I spend alot, possibly too much on my quick turn and throttle control as I am always trying to turn a little quicker and roll on a little harder through the turn! I consciously make sure my head is where I want it to be as I have a tendency to pull it in so I guess that uses up a bit of my attention! Also when I decide to work on something in specific e.g. pivot steering, or the pickup drill etc I spend alot of attention on something I'm practicing. I dont spend anything on who is behind me though!

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You've got a good souce of Material in T1 about attention grabbers. Certainly any barrier can be an attention robber.

 

To answer your question about spending <$1 on it, I would say that I do. My BP is a result of the product I want and not the other way round. Perhaps it will work for you if you switch it around in your head. In fact, if you go back and re-read some of your older posts it seems to be a major focus for you (which you've already discovered). You are NOW ready! So pat yourself on the back.

Yup. What makes us better riders is knowing what we DID do, and not what we DIDN'T. I feel like the end of a GI Joe cartoon. "And knowing is half the battle." Man, that TOTW is some good stuff.

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Hub,

 

In some of the posts above, the guys mention some techniques that are trained at the school, and we don't have them in any of the books (the pick up drill, or the 3-step).

 

The pick-up is a physical technique taught at level 2, the 3 step a visual technique taught same level.

 

Body positioning is a big issue with many of the students, and can take a bit of work to sort out. We addess some of it in Level 1, another big piece in Level 2 on the lean bike, and some more in Level 3.

 

Ideally getting it to take a smaller amount of your attention would be ideal, so you have it left over for the other parts: entry speed, lean angle, traction, line, location, traffic, etc.

 

C

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