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Good Day Everyone,

 

Before I dive in too much and come off looking like a Squid I want to explain. I am 38 years old and have been riding dirt bikes since I was a kid back in the 80s. I spent a lot of time on the old dirt bikes. I transitioned over to the streets with a Ninja ZX7R back in the late 90s. Rode it for about a year and a half and had a lot of fun. No major issues. I'm respectful of these bikes, know they have way more power that I have ability, and I just like to take it mellow and keep things controlled. Well, I recently pulled the pug and bought a liter bike because (1) they fit my frame better being 6'1" and 185 lbs with long arms and legs and (2) I got a heck of a deal. I now have a Yami R1. So, yeah....I know 180 HP on a 400 pound frame. Ha ha ha. I do ride it, but baby it. I'm not out dragging knee in turns or going ape. I really am a conservative rider...I know the common err is riders losing control and exiting the road. So, I tend to be very cautious of turns, ruts in the road, loose dirts, water, and all that stuff that can make me go boom. I probably ride like a grandpa...but that's ok out on the road. But I know that I need some expert training to make myself better....much better.

 

So I guess to say that yes, I do in fact ride an R1 liter bike that is way beyond my ability. I admit it, I know I need training, and I respect the bike. I want to improve my skills with cornering, emergency recovery, and braking. This is what I want to learn from your team IF you have a class for this. I do know how to ride and have been doing it for a good 20 years, but it's been casual riding and not the style that I need to control a liter bike. I want to be a better ride and develop the necessary skills. I will continute to exercise great restraint on the road, take it easy, and just enjoy my bike. I am NOT a wild, crazy rider. But I do want to improve and spend some time on the track getting some good training.

 

I learn fast and am a good listener. If I am shown something I will do it on the bike as shown. I just need the help. What options are going to be best for me?

 

Regards,

John

aka "Snuff"

Germantown, MD

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Welcome to the forum John, great group of people here. Sounds like you have your head on straight so I don't think an R1 and it's power will be a challenge for you. I sell bikes for a living and if you were a new 18 year old with no motorcycle experience at all I'd be giving different advice, the bottom line is the throttle goes both ways, and you have the maturity to respect it.

Your option to start, is get your head in the books, most will chime in here with this as well. If you haven't already read Twist of the Wrist 1 and 2 do so at your earliest convenience, they will make you think about your riding. The next step if you can and have the means is get to the CSS schools. I did my first 2 day in Vegas last year and I felt my riding go to a whole new level after 18 years on the street and 7 off and on years at the track. If track days are an option anywhere close to you I cannot stress highly enough the value of a controlled environment to work on your skills. The fact that it is a #%%load of fun is a big bonus. Don't be afraid to ask questions as we can all learn from each other. Once again Welcome!

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Thanks Sleepr.

 

So what class would benefit me most? Yes, I live near two CSS locations (VIR and NJ). I guess I could use some advice on what class would be best for me in terms of digging-in. I've never done any track riding, but would be open to it. The big things that would probably benefit me most (in my opinion) are cornering and controling the bike.

 

I would love and welcome the opportunity to get some good training.

 

Regards,

John

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All riders start with level 1, (there are 4) and go from there. I did the 2 day camp last year (L1 & L2) because of the distance I had to travel for them, I'm signed up for level 3 and 4 at the 2 day in Vegas in mid March, but if your close to those tracks you need to find a way to get to them! I had a chance to ride VIR 2 years ago while there to spectate AMA Superbike and it is a neat track. Looking at the school schedule it looks like you have a few opportunities in May or August to attend. You have the options of just doing one level at a time if you wish, but I can't comment on the single level option as it was not feasable for me.

You can bring your own bike or do it on the school bikes depending on your wants, search the forum for opinions on both options, there are a few threads dealing with that topic.

The schools will most certainly help you with the areas you want to improve, but I can't stress enough the value of the books in the meantime, they're of value to anyone that rides a motorcycle on pavement IMHO. I won't get into the drills in each level because I think they have more value with the classroom sessions. All the schools follow the format of classroom, then on track drill, debrief with your coach, repeat. Each level and drill build on the previous lessons. Even world champions started at level 1.

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Welcome. As Sleepr said, the books will help you a lot, and prove invaluable. You've bought a bike that I'm seriously going to consider when I start shopping for a new one.

If you want to see what it can do, you could always bring it to Firebird, and I'll let you know how it handles.

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I have actually read that book. Twist of the Wrist was the very first book that I bought years ago with my ZX7R. I read the book cover to cover before I took the Ninja out of the garage. I understand the principles on paper, but practicing them is the big thing. So far I have been very blessed in my motorcycle career. I've never really dropped a bike or had too many mis-haps. But again I don't push the envelope like some of my buddies. I just want to be prepared for that day when I do need to evade some out of control car or antelope running across the street. My biggest challenge has always been aggressive, obnoxious drivers. It's why I sold my orginial Ninja. My fear isn't ME crashing myself per se...it's collision with other drivers not seeing me or them pulling some stupid stunt that puts me at risk. Drivers around Washngton DC are nuts and I do have to drive around traffic to get to those good crusing areas. I need to have razor sharp skills to survive around here.

 

I'm revisiting them this week while we have 4" of snow outside and my bike is freezing in the garage:-)

 

I contacted the school about getting started yesterday...waiting on hearing back from them. I'll start with Level 1 and go from there....I'll decide between the 2 day and the 1 day.

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I have actually read that book. Twist of the Wrist was the very first book that I bought years ago with my ZX7R. I read the book cover to cover before I took the Ninja out of the garage. I understand the principles on paper, but practicing them is the big thing. So far I have been very blessed in my motorcycle career. I've never really dropped a bike or had too many mis-haps. But again I don't push the envelope like some of my buddies. I just want to be prepared for that day when I do need to evade some out of control car or antelope running across the street. My biggest challenge has always been aggressive, obnoxious drivers. It's why I sold my orginial Ninja. My fear isn't ME crashing myself per se...it's collision with other drivers not seeing me or them pulling some stupid stunt that puts me at risk. Drivers around Washngton DC are nuts and I do have to drive around traffic to get to those good crusing areas. I need to have razor sharp skills to survive around here.

 

I'm revisiting them this week while we have 4" of snow outside and my bike is freezing in the garage:-)

 

I contacted the school about getting started yesterday...waiting on hearing back from them. I'll start with Level 1 and go from there....I'll decide between the 2 day and the 1 day.

Germantown is up the road a bit from me. :rolleyes:

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Welcome John, I am also a liter bike rider. I ride a GSXR 1000. I have ridden both a 600 and my 1000 on tracks and I do have to say the 600 is a blast to throw around but the liter bikes demand you riding them right and that is a challenge I truly love. Have fun out at the school and ask away with all you want to know.

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Hi Shuffle,

 

OK, 2 biased and personal cents on this.

 

Keith developed some of the material that is trained in level 2 currently, back in the early 90's. We got a chance to read some of his research that lead to Twist 2 at the time, and there was one skill in particular that absolutely changed my street riding, from being entertaining and sometimes a little too exciting, to just entertaining, and no real dramas.

 

Highly recommend if you can figure out how to do 2 days of schools (either a 2-day camp, or 2 single days, whatever works out for you), that you do Levels 1 and 2.

 

I ride in LA traffic and we are allowed to split lanes, so of course I do. Changed that activity from being high on the stress meter, to no big deal.

 

Let us know what you do!

 

Best,

Cobie

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Good Day Everyone,

 

Before I dive in too much and come off looking like a Squid I want to explain. I am 38 years old and have been riding dirt bikes since I was a kid back in the 80s. I spent a lot of time on the old dirt bikes. I transitioned over to the streets with a Ninja ZX7R back in the late 90s. Rode it for about a year and a half and had a lot of fun. No major issues. I'm respectful of these bikes, know they have way more power that I have ability, and I just like to take it mellow and keep things controlled. Well, I recently pulled the pug and bought a liter bike because (1) they fit my frame better being 6'1" and 185 lbs with long arms and legs and (2) I got a heck of a deal. I now have a Yami R1. So, yeah....I know 180 HP on a 400 pound frame. Ha ha ha. I do ride it, but baby it. I'm not out dragging knee in turns or going ape. I really am a conservative rider...I know the common err is riders losing control and exiting the road. So, I tend to be very cautious of turns, ruts in the road, loose dirts, water, and all that stuff that can make me go boom. I probably ride like a grandpa...but that's ok out on the road. But I know that I need some expert training to make myself better....much better.

 

So I guess to say that yes, I do in fact ride an R1 liter bike that is way beyond my ability. I admit it, I know I need training, and I respect the bike. I want to improve my skills with cornering, emergency recovery, and braking. This is what I want to learn from your team IF you have a class for this. I do know how to ride and have been doing it for a good 20 years, but it's been casual riding and not the style that I need to control a liter bike. I want to be a better ride and develop the necessary skills. I will continute to exercise great restraint on the road, take it easy, and just enjoy my bike. I am NOT a wild, crazy rider. But I do want to improve and spend some time on the track getting some good training.

 

I learn fast and am a good listener. If I am shown something I will do it on the bike as shown. I just need the help. What options are going to be best for me?

 

Regards,

John

aka "Snuff"

Germantown, MD

 

 

 

Snuff,

I'm with you on being called a squid, I've already 'inquired' about it to Cobbie himself :lol: . But sadly, I probably belong in the squid category.... for now. I've been riding for about 3 years, started with an SV1000, it was used, it had fairings and dual yoshi pipe's. I think what intrigued me the most about it was the sound, it was definitely different from everyone else's... you knew it was this bike that was coming before you even saw it. I've since sold it for a GSX-R 750, had it for about 2 years now. I'm currently serving this great nation courtesy of The Marine Corps. I just returned today from Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, NC, where Dylan Code and some of the CSS team where out there testing a new program geared for the military, in order to reduce the fatalities we're suffering due to motorcycle accidents. I'll tell you a little know fact: the Marine Corps and Navy has lost more service members to motorcycle accidents than we have to hostile fire since the beginning of the Global War on Terrorism (the Iraq and Afghanistan Wars). Dylan drove home a point that hit us all deep yesterday during our debrief, he pretty much said that, 'if we (motorcyclists in general) but specifically Service Members continue down this path, we may lose the very thing we are fighting for.... freedom, the freedom to ride our bikes and possibly have more restrictions placed on us. I'm not gonna lie, before yesterday I thought I was a pretty good rider, but I (and probably all of us that were out there, about 40 riders) got a hard reality check yesterday. To me yesterday was a mere glimpse of what CSS has to offer, and we were only set up on what I believe was about a quarter mile circuit, small but effective (I only reached 80 MPH on the straight away and probably topped out at 30-40 MPH on the sweeping curve.... but it taught us ALOT, and the instructors were set up all at every corner and would pull us in to coach us. The six of us that went down from our command at Norfolk talked about it the rest of the night yesterday and the whole 5 hr ride back home today. I will most definitely be taking a CSS course here in the near future, probably at VIR, since its only about an hour away, but I HIGHLY recommend taking their classes. I know I couldn't have learned what I did yesterday from just anyone. I cant thank Keith/CSS and everyone else recognizing that we, the Armed Services (and all motorcyclist) have a dilemma, and that they're making the effort help us change that. Hope to see you on the track one day!

 

~FIJI

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Snuff,

I'm with you on being called a squid, I've already 'inquired' about it to Cobbie himself :lol: . But sadly, I probably belong in the squid category.... for now. I've been riding for about 3 years, started with an SV1000, it was used, it had fairings and dual yoshi pipe's. I think what intrigued me the most about it was the sound, it was definitely different from everyone else's... you knew it was this bike that was coming before you even saw it. I've since sold it for a GSX-R 750, had it for about 2 years now. I'm currently serving this great nation courtesy of The Marine Corps. I just returned today from Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, NC, where Dylan Code and some of the CSS team where out there testing a new program geared for the military, in order to reduce the fatalities we're suffering due to motorcycle accidents. I'll tell you a little know fact: the Marine Corps and Navy has lost more service members to motorcycle accidents than we have to hostile fire since the beginning of the Global War on Terrorism (the Iraq and Afghanistan Wars). Dylan drove home a point that hit us all deep yesterday during our debrief, he pretty much said that, 'if we (motorcyclists in general) but specifically Service Members continue down this path, we may lose the very thing we are fighting for.... freedom, the freedom to ride our bikes and possibly have more restrictions placed on us. I'm not gonna lie, before yesterday I thought I was a pretty good rider, but I (and probably all of us that were out there, about 40 riders) got a hard reality check yesterday. To me yesterday was a mere glimpse of what CSS has to offer, and we were only set up on what I believe was about a quarter mile circuit, small but effective (I only reached 80 MPH on the straight away and probably topped out at 30-40 MPH on the sweeping curve.... but it taught us ALOT, and the instructors were set up all at every corner and would pull us in to coach us. The six of us that went down from our command at Norfolk talked about it the rest of the night yesterday and the whole 5 hr ride back home today. I will most definitely be taking a CSS course here in the near future, probably at VIR, since its only about an hour away, but I HIGHLY recommend taking their classes. I know I couldn't have learned what I did yesterday from just anyone. I cant thank Keith/CSS and everyone else recognizing that we, the Armed Services (and all motorcyclist) have a dilemma, and that they're making the effort help us change that. Hope to see you on the track one day!

 

~FIJI

 

Fiji;

Great post and your statistic on military motorcycling accidents was startling...who would have ever thought that was possible?

If the course that Dylan's team set up was on base and not a traditional race track - wait until you go to CSS at VIR. You will be changed forever. ; )

 

Welcome to the Forum and thank you for your service.

 

Kevin Kane

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Snuff,

I'm with you on being called a squid, I've already 'inquired' about it to Cobbie himself :lol: . But sadly, I probably belong in the squid category.... for now. I've been riding for about 3 years, started with an SV1000, it was used, it had fairings and dual yoshi pipe's. I think what intrigued me the most about it was the sound, it was definitely different from everyone else's... you knew it was this bike that was coming before you even saw it. I've since sold it for a GSX-R 750, had it for about 2 years now. I'm currently serving this great nation courtesy of The Marine Corps. I just returned today from Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, NC, where Dylan Code and some of the CSS team where out there testing a new program geared for the military, in order to reduce the fatalities we're suffering due to motorcycle accidents. I'll tell you a little know fact: the Marine Corps and Navy has lost more service members to motorcycle accidents than we have to hostile fire since the beginning of the Global War on Terrorism (the Iraq and Afghanistan Wars). Dylan drove home a point that hit us all deep yesterday during our debrief, he pretty much said that, 'if we (motorcyclists in general) but specifically Service Members continue down this path, we may lose the very thing we are fighting for.... freedom, the freedom to ride our bikes and possibly have more restrictions placed on us. I'm not gonna lie, before yesterday I thought I was a pretty good rider, but I (and probably all of us that were out there, about 40 riders) got a hard reality check yesterday. To me yesterday was a mere glimpse of what CSS has to offer, and we were only set up on what I believe was about a quarter mile circuit, small but effective (I only reached 80 MPH on the straight away and probably topped out at 30-40 MPH on the sweeping curve.... but it taught us ALOT, and the instructors were set up all at every corner and would pull us in to coach us. The six of us that went down from our command at Norfolk talked about it the rest of the night yesterday and the whole 5 hr ride back home today. I will most definitely be taking a CSS course here in the near future, probably at VIR, since its only about an hour away, but I HIGHLY recommend taking their classes. I know I couldn't have learned what I did yesterday from just anyone. I cant thank Keith/CSS and everyone else recognizing that we, the Armed Services (and all motorcyclist) have a dilemma, and that they're making the effort help us change that. Hope to see you on the track one day!

 

~FIJI

 

Fiji;

Great post and your statistic on military motorcycling accidents was startling...who would have ever thought that was possible?

If the course that Dylan's team set up was on base and not a traditional race track - wait until you go to CSS at VIR. You will be changed forever. ; )

 

Welcome to the Forum and thank you for your service.

 

Kevin Kane

 

Kevin,

Thanks. And believe me, I dont think anyone could be more excited than me to attend the CSS at VIR in May. Now I just have to get the clearance to finance this class through the boss (aka the wife) ;) and hopefully I will be in the area and not going to some training exercise elsewhere, but I'll have to wait and see. Dylan told us, that he really wanted to get involved when he did some research and found out that the military accident rate is higher than the civilian rate!

 

FIJI

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Snuff,

I'm with you on being called a squid, I've already 'inquired' about it to Cobbie himself :lol: . But sadly, I probably belong in the squid category.... for now. I've been riding for about 3 years, started with an SV1000, it was used, it had fairings and dual yoshi pipe's. I think what intrigued me the most about it was the sound, it was definitely different from everyone else's... you knew it was this bike that was coming before you even saw it. I've since sold it for a GSX-R 750, had it for about 2 years now. I'm currently serving this great nation courtesy of The Marine Corps. I just returned today from Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, NC, where Dylan Code and some of the CSS team where out there testing a new program geared for the military, in order to reduce the fatalities we're suffering due to motorcycle accidents. I'll tell you a little know fact: the Marine Corps and Navy has lost more service members to motorcycle accidents than we have to hostile fire since the beginning of the Global War on Terrorism (the Iraq and Afghanistan Wars). Dylan drove home a point that hit us all deep yesterday during our debrief, he pretty much said that, 'if we (motorcyclists in general) but specifically Service Members continue down this path, we may lose the very thing we are fighting for.... freedom, the freedom to ride our bikes and possibly have more restrictions placed on us. I'm not gonna lie, before yesterday I thought I was a pretty good rider, but I (and probably all of us that were out there, about 40 riders) got a hard reality check yesterday. To me yesterday was a mere glimpse of what CSS has to offer, and we were only set up on what I believe was about a quarter mile circuit, small but effective (I only reached 80 MPH on the straight away and probably topped out at 30-40 MPH on the sweeping curve.... but it taught us ALOT, and the instructors were set up all at every corner and would pull us in to coach us. The six of us that went down from our command at Norfolk talked about it the rest of the night yesterday and the whole 5 hr ride back home today. I will most definitely be taking a CSS course here in the near future, probably at VIR, since its only about an hour away, but I HIGHLY recommend taking their classes. I know I couldn't have learned what I did yesterday from just anyone. I cant thank Keith/CSS and everyone else recognizing that we, the Armed Services (and all motorcyclist) have a dilemma, and that they're making the effort help us change that. Hope to see you on the track one day!

 

~FIJI

 

Fiji;

Great post and your statistic on military motorcycling accidents was startling...who would have ever thought that was possible?

If the course that Dylan's team set up was on base and not a traditional race track - wait until you go to CSS at VIR. You will be changed forever. ; )

 

Welcome to the Forum and thank you for your service.

 

Kevin Kane

 

Kevin,

Thanks. And believe me, I dont think anyone could be more excited than me to attend the CSS at VIR in May. Now I just have to get the clearance to finance this class through the boss (aka the wife) ;) and hopefully I will be in the area and not going to some training exercise elsewhere, but I'll have to wait and see. Dylan told us, that he really wanted to get involved when he did some research and found out that the military accident rate is higher than the civilian rate!

 

FIJI

 

The Corps paid for my MSF course. It's now required that all servicemembers take it. I wonder if the argument can be made for further training.

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Snuff,

I'm with you on being called a squid, I've already 'inquired' about it to Cobbie himself :lol: . But sadly, I probably belong in the squid category.... for now. I've been riding for about 3 years, started with an SV1000, it was used, it had fairings and dual yoshi pipe's. I think what intrigued me the most about it was the sound, it was definitely different from everyone else's... you knew it was this bike that was coming before you even saw it. I've since sold it for a GSX-R 750, had it for about 2 years now. I'm currently serving this great nation courtesy of The Marine Corps. I just returned today from Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, NC, where Dylan Code and some of the CSS team where out there testing a new program geared for the military, in order to reduce the fatalities we're suffering due to motorcycle accidents. I'll tell you a little know fact: the Marine Corps and Navy has lost more service members to motorcycle accidents than we have to hostile fire since the beginning of the Global War on Terrorism (the Iraq and Afghanistan Wars). Dylan drove home a point that hit us all deep yesterday during our debrief, he pretty much said that, 'if we (motorcyclists in general) but specifically Service Members continue down this path, we may lose the very thing we are fighting for.... freedom, the freedom to ride our bikes and possibly have more restrictions placed on us. I'm not gonna lie, before yesterday I thought I was a pretty good rider, but I (and probably all of us that were out there, about 40 riders) got a hard reality check yesterday. To me yesterday was a mere glimpse of what CSS has to offer, and we were only set up on what I believe was about a quarter mile circuit, small but effective (I only reached 80 MPH on the straight away and probably topped out at 30-40 MPH on the sweeping curve.... but it taught us ALOT, and the instructors were set up all at every corner and would pull us in to coach us. The six of us that went down from our command at Norfolk talked about it the rest of the night yesterday and the whole 5 hr ride back home today. I will most definitely be taking a CSS course here in the near future, probably at VIR, since its only about an hour away, but I HIGHLY recommend taking their classes. I know I couldn't have learned what I did yesterday from just anyone. I cant thank Keith/CSS and everyone else recognizing that we, the Armed Services (and all motorcyclist) have a dilemma, and that they're making the effort help us change that. Hope to see you on the track one day!

 

~FIJI

 

Fiji;

Great post and your statistic on military motorcycling accidents was startling...who would have ever thought that was possible?

If the course that Dylan's team set up was on base and not a traditional race track - wait until you go to CSS at VIR. You will be changed forever. ; )

 

Welcome to the Forum and thank you for your service.

 

Kevin Kane

 

Kevin,

Thanks. And believe me, I dont think anyone could be more excited than me to attend the CSS at VIR in May. Now I just have to get the clearance to finance this class through the boss (aka the wife) ;) and hopefully I will be in the area and not going to some training exercise elsewhere, but I'll have to wait and see. Dylan told us, that he really wanted to get involved when he did some research and found out that the military accident rate is higher than the civilian rate!

 

FIJI

 

The Corps paid for my MSF course. It's now required that all servicemembers take it. I wonder if the argument can be made for further training.

 

The Corps has also made it mandatory for ALL sports bike riders to take the Military Sports bike Course within 90 days of completing the BRC as of last Oct I believe. The Corps is definitely trying to push further training as well, they have realized that we're facing a dilemma with all these lives we're losing due to motorcycle accidents. CSS was beta testing a new program that I participated in this past week in Cherry Point with about 40 riders, I rode on Wed, they also had riders on Thurs and Fri. I'm gonna go out on a limb and say that they'll make it operational and standardize it throughout the Corps and hopefully the armed forces, the knowledge and understanding that you come away with after going through this course is invaluable, and we all agreed that we couldn't have gotten that type of training any where else, it definitely opened our eyes. We had ZERO incidences with our group on Wed, not sure about the other two groups though.

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I joined the motorcycle family a little before I got out of the military. There were a pretty good group of riders. We had an amateur racer riding with us, and helped us all he could. Louisiana is FULL of backroads, and sometimes you have 2 cops covering 2-3 counties at a time on the weekends. We were able to open the bikes up, and got to learn a fair amount of riding at high speeds. Otherwise we would have been a bunch of idiots riding wrecklessly.

There were a bunch of us who had come back from war, and it takes A LOT to get us pumped, and when we do, we want to stay up there. Take that and stick 110 hp between your legs, and you've got a volatile situation.

I'd recommend sportbike riding to anyone with PTSD, as long as they get the proper training. It forces me to focus on what's going on, and gives me the adrenaline rush I need to get any feeling of excitement at the same time.

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I'm going to guess Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. I know it can be big issue for returning service members, please keep up the good work, we all owe you a lot.

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