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Body Position On A Puny 150cc Bike


sajiv
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I have read some of the recommendations on body position in this forum but I am not sure whether they apply to lower CC bike.

I have not attended any schools on riding as those are not available here in India.

 

Here s a pic of me cornering. It would be great if I could get some comments on my body position.

http://picasaweb.google.co.in/lh/photo/RnT...feat=directlink

 

I normally don't get into position for the turn before braking. I do it only after braking and downshifting. Should the shift in position of the hip be changed before braking?

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When you're done braking and shifting, you should already be in position with nothing to do except countersteer.

 

what I currently do is first brake and before turning in slide my butt to position. I am comfortable doing this.

I tried to shift before braking but didnt have the confidence to brake hard in the crossed position.

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I do know there is a difference in BP. I don't know how big it is though. Looks the same on TV. Pasini, a 250 Moto GP rider, tested the Pramac Ducati this week. The bike had to be changed to accommodate him, but he also needed help with BP, because he said that is completely different as well. I don't know what the differences are, but I can imagine. I don't know how much the actual turning position is different, but I'm sure everything from braking to getting to the lean position, to coming into a more upright position is different in some way.

As for your BP, you've got a really good base to work with. You shouldn't have much difficulty fixing the small things. I may be mistake on a few things because of the photos and angles.

If I've copied the correct pic, you look nice and tucked in on this photo:

 

http://picasaweb.google.co.in/sajiv.selvar...875686495783554

 

Getting closer to the tank will weigh the bike better, and I'd guess that on a 250, your weight distribution is very important. Just getting closer to the tank would probably make cornering that much better for you. I'll refer to the guy in the blue bike in the next pic for comparison:

 

http://picasaweb.google.co.in/sajiv.selvar...526822247115186

 

His chest is closer to the tank. Again, I can't tell because it may be the angle, but ultimately he could probably be more over just a little more as well. It's also going to help with getting pressure off the bars for better turning.

I'm not sure if you're relaxing your outside arm, but it doesn't look like it from the pics. If you pull to turn or are in a fast corner and need both arms to turn, it's alright. But turning usually takes a slight push on the inside bar. Whichever you do is fine, but you shouldn't have pressure on the bars. Drop/relax your shoulders. Ben "Elbowz" Spies is a unique rider with his arm position. If you're tense on the bars anything from inconsistencies (bumps, elevation changes) in the track, you sliding around on the bike, or mistakes, is going to be transmitted to the steering from your stiff arms.

Your body is nice and straight, for the most part while leaned over, and while keeping straight, you could try leaning off the bike more. You seem to have maxed out your cornering clearance. That and/or rearsets. There are some pics that look like you're dragging your foot or some hard parts instead of your knee. Getting off more will give you more lean.

In the next pic you are WAY off the tank, but you seem to have more lean angle.

 

http://picasaweb.google.co.in/sajiv.selvar...844857870974066

 

A more consistent BP will make turning smoother and more consistent as well. One thing that will change will be how far your head is from the ground. It will change your speed, because you'll think your leaning more. I'm guessing you've been doing this for a while, so your eyes and brain are conditioned to angle and distance from the ground. It's something that takes work, but will ultimately pay off. Usually, keeping your head up, body straight, and simply laying your chest on the tank, will help you shift to a more workable position from there.

This guy looks like a coach, and his body isn't as straight as yours, but you'll see he's farther down, and farther off the bike, giving him more lean.

 

http://picasaweb.google.co.in/sajiv.selvar...024578602050674

 

You look good, and more importantly, really comfortable, doing this. So sliding around in the seat shouldn't be too much of a challenge. Your pics are great also. You guys look like you're really enjoying yourselves. Having fun is the most important thing.

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When you're done braking and shifting, you should already be in position with nothing to do except countersteer.

 

what I currently do is first brake and before turning in slide my butt to position. I am comfortable doing this.

I tried to shift before braking but didnt have the confidence to brake hard in the crossed position.

 

There are other things to work on that will help you improve, but when you shift your butt while you're still in a straight, you're using less attention, so it's just something you'll do. And with all the attention you need going into a corner, this is one less thing to do while preparing to engage it, and you don't want to do it WHILE braking. I saw most Moto GP riders shift their bottoms while still on the throttle, and studied this to see WHY they did it. The above is the explanation I got from a few different sources across the board.

You'll live not doing it, but doing it now will help in the long run. I wasn't comfortable doing it at first, but at the end of one trackday I wasn't even thinking about it anymore.

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Wiki says that bike is less than $2000 US. It looks like it would make me a good track bike, wonder if I can get one in the states???

That's what I was thinking. They look like they're getting on it though. I looked into getting a 250 in track shape, but it's too expensive. I'd be better served just buying another 600 that already has the basics on it.

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@hubbard_28 and Jaybird180: Thank you so much guys. Planning to hit the track this weekend. Will try and put your suggestions into practice.

I ll get back to you guys with new set of pics probably next week. :)

 

@Jaybird180: Yes the bike is a very good track tool. Very forgiving(deltabox frame) for beginners like us but underpowered :(

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@hubbard_28 and Jaybird180: Thank you so much guys. Planning to hit the track this weekend. Will try and put your suggestions into practice.

I ll get back to you guys with new set of pics probably next week. :)

 

@Jaybird180: Yes the bike is a very good track tool. Very forgiving(deltabox frame) for beginners like us but underpowered :(

It would be great to see your progress. You may need to slow it down initially because the change of feel, but as I tell my wife repeatedly: the shape of the cockpit doesn't change. Move around and get comfortable. Adjust to the bike. Good luck, and have fun.

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Underpowered can be a good thing when you're working on technique. I've told all my friends that I wish I'd started on something smaller. Dunno if I can go back now (hmmmm..........)

I still look around for 250's to check pricing, but it would be a project bike I'd work on when my wife graduated. As small as the tracks are here (1.16 and 1.25 miles) there aren't any straights, so I could even keep up with the 600's. All the shifting would be interesting though.

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... the shape of the cockpit doesn't change....

 

What do you mean by this, Hub?

One thing that my wife was having problems with every time she made a change to her BP, was that she would slide herself back up in the seat, and she couldn't properly lock in her outside leg. She blamed the bike and change of position. Mostly, it was never her hips that we worked on because she keeps shifting and isn't able to lock in. I kept reminding her that the tank, handlebars, pegs, throttle, brake, clutch (unless there's a crash or you change something out) are all going to be in exactly the same place every time you move around on the bike. She needs to remember where the tank is when she's making a BP change, and adjust to the bike, because I can't slide the tank up.

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  • 3 months later...

Sajiv, brilliant. Your BP is very good. How far are you getting your butt off the seat? I learned on mine that I don't have to shove my butt all the way off the seat, and it gives me that much more lean room. Fantastic job, though.

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  • 4 weeks later...

i get my hiney in position before i start braking & downshifting, that way i don't upset the bike when i start turning it into the corner, this alone helped me shave my lap times. before i was braking with my body centered on the bike & i found it difficult to shift my body into position after i finished my braking & downshifting, it also made my bike unstable as i started to move into position as i enter the corner.

 

apart from my 600RR i have a Yamaha Aerox 70cc scooter which is modified to the hilt & is my dedicated track bike, whenever i hit a wall on my riding or just want to experiment or try a new technique i break out my scooter from thearage & take it to the track. these little bikes may have small engines but once they gain momentum they can go as fast through the tight corners at the track i frequent to, maybe even faster, this is where i learned to maintain my corner speed through the turns which i applied to my 600RR. without a small bike to try & learn new things on i wouldn't progress this much as a rider.

 

i know a few guys who are riding 600's & 1000's on the track who could learn quicker if they went down to a smaller bike, my brother did the right thing & bought an HRC RS125, on his 2nd trackday he made a big leap forward in his riding skills, i myself admitted on some corners i am much faster on his RS125 than on my 600RR.

 

over here we have some entry level sportbikes sold on the market that would be a perfect track tool.

 

Honda CBR150R

Kawasaki KRR150 (2stroke)

Yamaha YZF-R150

 

you guys have the Ninja 250R so i think that would be a nice learner bike for the track too, Kawasaki introduced it this year in the Philippines & it would be the perfect bike coming off a 125-150cc before you go 600-1000.

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  • 3 months later...

Back in another question :)

 

This is the track - track_525.jpg

 

I am not completely sure on how to handle corners c4 and c5. The problem that I am facing is I am able to take C4 properly but I tend to close the throttle while shifting from one side to the other for c5.

 

Is that the correct way to to handle such corners?

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