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Body Position & Weight


lazyrider
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Question: On a moto X bike I've been taught to keep my weight forward on the seat (4 fingers from the front of seat) to ensure that my body weight is in the centre of the bike between the front and rear wheel so that the rear wheel can pivot around my body and move when required without wiping out or high siding.

 

Is this the case with a track bike as when watching the new DVD "Twist of the wrist 2" it talks about pushing your backside into the rear of the seat to lock it in. Does this put more weight over the rear wheel or because your upper body is pushed forward is you COG still central between the front & rear wheel as its spread out along the bike?

 

I just started thinking about this one and wondered if you could offer any advice?

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Question: On a moto X bike I've been taught to keep my weight forward on the seat (4 fingers from the front of seat) to ensure that my body weight is in the centre of the bike between the front and rear wheel so that the rear wheel can pivot around my body and move when required without wiping out or high siding.

 

Is this the case with a track bike as when watching the new DVD "Twist of the wrist 2" it talks about pushing your backside into the rear of the seat to lock it in. Does this put more weight over the rear wheel or because your upper body is pushed forward is you COG still central between the front & rear wheel as its spread out along the bike?

 

I just started thinking about this one and wondered if you could offer any advice?

 

The point of being pushed back in the seat is more a point of being locked in. Have you tried to lock in on the bike when close to the tank and attempted further back? If so, what have you learned..? Why do you think being locked in on a sportbike is important, but where maybe on a dirtbike you need to be so fluent with the bike?

 

Bullet

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Question: On a moto X bike I've been taught to keep my weight forward on the seat (4 fingers from the front of seat) to ensure that my body weight is in the centre of the bike between the front and rear wheel so that the rear wheel can pivot around my body and move when required without wiping out or high siding.

 

Is this the case with a track bike as when watching the new DVD "Twist of the wrist 2" it talks about pushing your backside into the rear of the seat to lock it in. Does this put more weight over the rear wheel or because your upper body is pushed forward is you COG still central between the front & rear wheel as its spread out along the bike?

 

I just started thinking about this one and wondered if you could offer any advice?

 

The point of being pushed back in the seat is more a point of being locked in. Have you tried to lock in on the bike when close to the tank and attempted further back? If so, what have you learned..? Why do you think being locked in on a sportbike is important, but where maybe on a dirtbike you need to be so fluent with the bike?

 

Bullet

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There is definitely a "sweetspot" where you want to get your butt. I was working on it while at CSS because of the riding actually adjusting. The farther back I got, the more comfortable I was until I went just a little too far, then I was putting weight on the bars because of how far back I was. I'm 6'2, and am not comfortably positioned when I go all the way back. Too far forward and I was curled up, and wasn't able to get the weight on the tank properly to get my weight on the front of the bike (learned that a long time ago).

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When I did my level 3 earlier this year my instructor told me to get as far back in the seat as I possibly could, mainly this was finding the best point for me personally to get locked onto the bike, (he also mentioned making me not looking so much like a big guy on a small bike), I'm 6ft 2 and my bike is a cbr600rr, but as I said the main reason was to get securely locked onto the bike!

I have recently seen smaller people use a piece of foam to effectively bring the back of the seat forward a bit, I saw a woman in her 60s at the nurburgring earlier this year using this on an R1, also see that Dani Pedrosa uses this too!

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There is definitely a "sweetspot" where you want to get your butt. I was working on it while at CSS because of the riding actually adjusting. The farther back I got, the more comfortable I was until I went just a little too far, then I was putting weight on the bars because of how far back I was. I'm 6'2, and am not comfortably positioned when I go all the way back. Too far forward and I was curled up, and wasn't able to get the weight on the tank properly to get my weight on the front of the bike (learned that a long time ago).
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Jasonzilla & acebobby thanks for the reply. I'm also 6'2" and have an R1. I think I need to go out & try a few laps to see what feels best. Hopefully I will be doing the level 3 course early next year as well.

 

Thanks

 

Lazy,

 

One thing that can help prep you for level 3, is a little bit of leg work out, and work the inner thighs too. Stuman uses a Thighmaster (really, he does).

 

CF

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I think I need to go out & try a few laps to see what feels best. Hopefully I will be doing the level 3 course early next year as well.

 

Thanks

 

If you have a carousel at your track, drop it down a notch and slide your butt back a little while your cornering. You'll be able to see the difference.

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I think I need to go out & try a few laps to see what feels best. Hopefully I will be doing the level 3 course early next year as well.

 

Thanks

 

If you have a carousel at your track, drop it down a notch and slide your butt back a little while your cornering. You'll be able to see the difference.

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Jasonzilla & acebobby thanks for the reply. I'm also 6'2" and have an R1. I think I need to go out & try a few laps to see what feels best. Hopefully I will be doing the level 3 course early next year as well.

 

Thanks

 

Lazy,

 

One thing that can help prep you for level 3, is a little bit of leg work out, and work the inner thighs too. Stuman uses a Thighmaster (really, he does).

 

CF

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Jasonzilla & acebobby thanks for the reply. I'm also 6'2" and have an R1. I think I need to go out & try a few laps to see what feels best. Hopefully I will be doing the level 3 course early next year as well.

 

Thanks

 

Lazy,

 

One thing that can help prep you for level 3, is a little bit of leg work out, and work the inner thighs too. Stuman uses a Thighmaster (really, he does).

 

CF

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Cobie,

 

Thanks for the advice on the Thigh master. I had a quick look at the entertaining advert on You Tube. From the comments a lot of people have found this advert very satisfying.

 

Are there are any other exercises / training you would recommend which are good for track fitness levels?

 

Thanks

 

Lazy

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Cobie,

 

Thanks for the advice on the Thigh master. I had a quick look at the entertaining advert on You Tube. From the comments a lot of people have found this advert very satisfying.

 

Are there are any other exercises / training you would recommend which are good for track fitness levels?

 

Thanks

 

Lazy

 

Lazy,

 

Bicycling is popular for motorcyclists (I like it too), so that's one. I think it's handy to have decent upper body strength for the steering, so exercising the arms/shoulders/back, and of course the abs, help me.

 

My latest program is by Dr. Al Sears, his book on fitness I really like (REDISCOVER YOUR NATIVE FITNESS: PACE by Al Sears).

 

CF

 

CF

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Hi Jasonzilla,

 

Thanks for the feedback. What do you mean when you say a carousel?

 

Thanks

 

Most tracks have that big turn that you can drag your knee just about all the way around. Something like a huge 180 degree turn. If your comfortable in it, you can work on making minor body adjustments.

 

The huge turn to the left is the carousel at Arroyo in New Mexico.

 

arroyo-2.jpg

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Jasonzilla,

 

Thanks for the post. I'm off to a track called Mallory Park (UK) this saturday which has a huge sweeping 180 degree right hander which should be ideal for this. The only downside is the weather is pretty cold and miserable in the UK at the moment, 8 - 10 degrees C so I'll have to take it pretty steady in the morning session until the track warms up a bit.

Mind you this should be an ideal opportunity to practise some off this stuff at a lower speed.

 

By the way the track you posted "Arroyo" looks like a really good technical track.

 

 

Cheers

 

Lazyrider

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Jasonzilla,

 

Thanks for the post. I'm off to a track called Mallory Park (UK) this saturday which has a huge sweeping 180 degree right hander which should be ideal for this. The only downside is the weather is pretty cold and miserable in the UK at the moment, 8 - 10 degrees C so I'll have to take it pretty steady in the morning session until the track warms up a bit.

Mind you this should be an ideal opportunity to practise some off this stuff at a lower speed.

 

By the way the track you posted "Arroyo" looks like a really good technical track.

 

 

Cheers

 

Lazyrider

 

When you have to go slower it is a great time to work on BP. You're at a more comfortable pace, and can adjust more and do to safely. Good luck. I'm doing the same thing this Sunday. It's only mid-40's, but still enough to force us to take it easy for a while.

 

Arroyo is supposedly technical, but I haven't ridden it yet. I had it on Photobucket, so I used it as an example. There are a couple SMALL elevation changes that are in just the right places. That's how a friend of mine got the nickname "Highside." He said he never knew it was there until the owner let him walk the track before the day started. It can be run both ways also.

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