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Achieving The Best Race Start And First Corner


Speedy66
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hi guys,

 

well first question to the forum. i am in my rookie season this year, i need some advice on the best race start i can get. on my local track i normally qualify in 10th position 3rd row out of 25 riders. so i need to make an early break for the front if i stand a chance of getting in top 3. at the moment i am just pulling away like you would on the road just a bit quicker tho. i cant get al this thing about taking the engine 8000rpm and poping the clutch, ive try that a few types and 9 times out of 10 it stalls.

 

so if anyone could give me some tips i would be most greatfull. Body Position and general actions of a race start.

 

also i am looking advice on the first corner of race normally i get a flusters into the first corner with all 30 bikes going for the same apex. normally i just try and slop in with my elbows and knees out so no one can get past. but i would like to be a bit more agressive ( if thats the word) to try and get a good position.

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Not sure of the bike you are on, if a 600, 8k is a bit low, try 10k, and let the clutch out a bit mroe slowly. As the clutch starts to come out, come into the throttle more, and control the power with the clutch. That's a very short version of it, let me know it it makes sense.

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That's what you need to do. And practice. Keep the revs around 10K and just as the clutch starts to bring the revs down minutely, use full throttle and manage the power with the clutch. The front should just be skimming the asphalt. You probably have to wait until your are doing about 50 mph on a 600 before the clutch is fully released.

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neow's on a 400 (VFR400 as I recall from his first post), so closer to 12K rpm perhaps.

 

I've never raced, but I read that you want to be at max torque, when letting the clutch out.

 

Regards,

 

Kai

 

EDIT: yup, a VFR400.

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Yes im riding a vfr 400 and looking at my dyno reading the most power is gained at 12000rpm after that it drops off. ive been looking at tt 2010 race starts lately and micheal dunlop appear to repeatively rev the engine and then pull then shoot offer. is this just him getting phyicd up?

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Going constantly on and off the throttle is poor technique, but quite common among road racers. They focus on other aspects of their riding than getting off the line. It has often surprised me how poorly many top rank racers are when it comes to starting well. Bogging, wheelying, spinning up - you can see it all even at the very highest level. Rossi and Pedrosa has worked very hard to improve their starts, and it shows, although they also have electronic help.

 

Different drag racers will have slightly different styles. Here's Dale Walker describing how he lauches a Vmax. Note that you have far, far less torque on your VFR and simply must ride the clutch and use full throttle quite early to prevent bogging. Also note that what seems like a long time (wait for the exhaust note to drop before feeding on the throttle) actually happens very quickly. Still, Walker's word will be much more valuable than mine tongue.gif

 

http://www.vmaxoutlaw.com/tech/launching.htm

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Neow, have a read of the Twist 2 Chapter 11, weight transfer section. This describes the reason for getting both your feet on the pegs as EARLY as possible after the start.

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Looks like talking about Keith's article on "The Barriers to Improvement":

Quote:

[ Good Starts

 

Take starts for example. You try to get a good launch and the right hand is too nervous on the throttle; your attention is fixed on it and the start is bogged. Putting all of ones attention onto the throttle and resisting the impact it "might" have leaves no attention free to look after the clutch.

 

Done properly, we bring the clutch out to just before engagement and pin the throttle, leaving all of our attention free to use the clutch and correctly meter the power to get the launch; no bog, no wheelie.]

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