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I'd appreciate if the instructors could give me their comments on the following.

I've been riding for about 8 years now (on and off). I've attended many track schools and in all of them I was recognized as one of the safest riders in the class. Unfortunately, I haven't been able to improve my track skills in any of those schools that much. One of the head instructors in one of those famous track schools told me: "I always have to remind students in the class to slow down and try not to get over their heads, but you are the only one that I have to tell to go faster!"

 

I gave up on riding on the track, accepting that I might never get very good at it, but I just found out that there is room in the two single day course at VIR in August. Do you think I should give it another shot?

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I gave up on riding on the track, accepting that I might never get very good at it, but I just found out that there is room in the two single day course at VIR in August. Do you think I should give it another shot?

 

I am not an instructor but can relate to the experience you describe (except the "safe" part). I am a very slow learner and it has taken me a long time to become "quicker" (note that's a relative term) than I used to be. With that said I would jump at the chance if I were you; go to the School at VIR.

 

The School WILL teach you how to ride better, more proficiently and give you a more thorough understanding of how motorcycles operate and what you have to do to ride them with more confidence and control. A significant part of the CSS experience is their ability to help students dismantle the barriers that hold all of us back. You will also see that some of their training is counter intuitative until you understand the principles involved and why it is almost impossible to self teach the skill sets needed to corner a motorcycle at speed.

 

I have attended other Schools and have been the unfortunate receipient of track club control rider's coaching in the past and those are part of the reason why I am such a firm believer in the School.

 

Since you have asked the question it is clear you haven't given up the idea yet so for the cost of two sets of tires or so you will receive a value that will take you further than the miles you could rack up on those tires. If you go, make sure you let us know how it goes and if I'm lyin' then you can lay me out right here for everybody else to see.

 

Rainman

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Rainman,

 

you hit the nail on the head:

I have attended other Schools and have been the unfortunate receipient of track club control rider's coaching in the past

 

 

I also attended a few of those track days with so and so track clubs and at the end of each day I found myself more and more confused and physically/mentally exhausted.

Thanks again for your encouragement.

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Rainman,

 

you hit the nail on the head:

I have attended other Schools and have been the unfortunate receipient of track club control rider's coaching in the past

 

 

I also attended a few of those track days with so and so track clubs and at the end of each day I found myself more and more confused and physically/mentally exhausted.

Thanks again for your encouragement.

 

Hi Slowest,

 

Well I'm sorry to hear you've not had much joy in improving at other schools. There are clearly different approaches to many of the schools throughout and clearly we think CSS and the methods developed by Keith and the team are the best, but that said, we still hear of good schools who do "their" thing and get improvement, which is what any training must be about.

 

I found your comment in the last post interesting, and thw word confused mean you've been left underwhelmed as you just don't understand the reasons to change or improve on something you've been asked to do. At CSS, we work very hard to ensure you understand the reasons and benefits for doing something before asking you to go and try applying it. It's a key point in the learning, as otherwise without it, it's just me, or any other coach (supposed expert), just asking you take a leap of faith that what say is going to reap results. Clearly that will work for some, but for many, well, they need to really understand the why!

 

I've no doubt you've got a few questions you'd perhaps to ask us before being entirely convinced on coming to the school, but I can assure you, as long as you have the desire to improve, are open and able to change and apply the drills we coach at the school, you'll improve, you'll get that feeling of being in better control, and you'll understand why!

 

Don't worry about your pace, we get all paces, don't feel self concious, be part of your learning and we'll improve together.

 

Bullet

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Hi Bullet,

as long as you have the desire to improve, are open and able to change and apply the drills we coach at the school, you'll improve

 

Don't worry about your pace, we get all paces, don't feel self concious, be part of your learning and we'll improve together.

 

 

I absolutely have the desire to improve and I'm definitely open to change and the above two quotes are enough for me to give it another shot.

 

 

thanks again,

Ardi

 

 

 

 

 

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Hi Bullet,

as long as you have the desire to improve, are open and able to change and apply the drills we coach at the school, you'll improve

 

Don't worry about your pace, we get all paces, don't feel self concious, be part of your learning and we'll improve together.

 

 

I absolutely have the desire to improve and I'm definitely open to change and the above two quotes are enough for me to give it another shot.

 

 

thanks again,

Ardi

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ardi,

 

Great. By all means ring into the office, to speak with a real person. Or mail Cobie on here, if you have any specific questions. He's not always about, but he'll happily answer any of your questions my friend. Alternatively, post them here, myself, or one of the other coaches will try and help, or one of the students who probably have had a similiar fear or experience will normally chime in to share their experiences if you wait long enough.

 

Glad to have helped (a bit), but please have a think if you have any other questions, fears, we'll try and help.

 

Bullet

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I'd appreciate if the instructors could give me their comments on the following.

I've been riding for about 8 years now (on and off). I've attended many track schools and in all of them I was recognized as one of the safest riders in the class. Unfortunately, I haven't been able to improve my track skills in any of those schools that much. One of the head instructors in one of those famous track schools told me: "I always have to remind students in the class to slow down and try not to get over their heads, but you are the only one that I have to tell to go faster!"

 

I gave up on riding on the track, accepting that I might never get very good at it, but I just found out that there is room in the two single day course at VIR in August. Do you think I should give it another shot?

 

 

I went to a CSS school, Level 1, my first time on racetrack. I started out really slow and had great improvements. I improved so much that I decided riding on the track was fun, and that I could someday get good at it. Then I went to a couple of other, different schools. Long story short, they scared me, made me think the whole sport was a lot more dangerous than I perceived it to be (I am very safe rider, too), and confused me. So I came back to CSS, and once again made startling improvements. CSS provides a safe, organized, and very well planned day in a program that works very, very well. Many other schools focus on "making you safe" whilst simultaneously scaring the pants off you by telling you all the things you COULD do wrong that MIGHT lead to disaster. CSS shows you how to do it right, get solid control of your motorycle and know exactly how to make it do what you want. Speed comes along with that, if you want it to.

 

Personally, I never need to be reminded to slow down and not ride over my head - I was never willing to go fast until I was sure I knew how to control the bike, CSS gave me that knowledge, now I go fast and still never ride over my head. I've never felt pushed, rushed, confused, or scared at a CSS day, and I've made BIG improvements every time.

 

Yes, come on out to VIR! I'll be there, August 17 & 18, come say hi - look for a lady with long brown hair who looks really happy to be there, that's me. :)

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I'd appreciate if the instructors could give me their comments on the following.

I've been riding for about 8 years now (on and off). I've attended many track schools and in all of them I was recognized as one of the safest riders in the class. Unfortunately, I haven't been able to improve my track skills in any of those schools that much. One of the head instructors in one of those famous track schools told me: "I always have to remind students in the class to slow down and try not to get over their heads, but you are the only one that I have to tell to go faster!"

 

I gave up on riding on the track, accepting that I might never get very good at it, but I just found out that there is room in the two single day course at VIR in August. Do you think I should give it another shot?

 

 

I went to a CSS school, Level 1, my first time on racetrack. I started out really slow and had great improvements. I improved so much that I decided riding on the track was fun, and that I could someday get good at it. Then I went to a couple of other, different schools. Long story short, they scared me, made me think the whole sport was a lot more dangerous than I perceived it to be (I am very safe rider, too), and confused me. So I came back to CSS, and once again made startling improvements. CSS provides a safe, organized, and very well planned day in a program that works very, very well. Many other schools focus on "making you safe" whilst simultaneously scaring the pants off you by telling you all the things you COULD do wrong that MIGHT lead to disaster. CSS shows you how to do it right, get solid control of your motorycle and know exactly how to make it do what you want. Speed comes along with that, if you want it to.

 

Personally, I never need to be reminded to slow down and not ride over my head - I was never willing to go fast until I was sure I knew how to control the bike, CSS gave me that knowledge, now I go fast and still never ride over my head. I've never felt pushed, rushed, confused, or scared at a CSS day, and I've made BIG improvements every time.

 

Yes, come on out to VIR! I'll be there, August 17 & 18, come say hi - look for a lady with long brown hair who looks really happy to be there, that's me. smile.gif

 

Ya see, I told ya. :-)

 

Great post Hotfoot.

 

Bullet

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HotFoot, Bullet, and Kevin, I really appreciate you providing me with your invaluable insights. Every post I read from you guys put me at more at ease.

I went ahead and signed up for the 18th at VIR. August 17th was completely booked :(

My fault for not posting here sooner.

 

Thanks again for all your help.

 

-Ardi

 

I'd appreciate if the instructors could give me their comments on the following.

I've been riding for about 8 years now (on and off). I've attended many track schools and in all of them I was recognized as one of the safest riders in the class. Unfortunately, I haven't been able to improve my track skills in any of those schools that much. One of the head instructors in one of those famous track schools told me: "I always have to remind students in the class to slow down and try not to get over their heads, but you are the only one that I have to tell to go faster!"

 

I gave up on riding on the track, accepting that I might never get very good at it, but I just found out that there is room in the two single day course at VIR in August. Do you think I should give it another shot?

 

 

I went to a CSS school, Level 1, my first time on racetrack. I started out really slow and had great improvements. I improved so much that I decided riding on the track was fun, and that I could someday get good at it. Then I went to a couple of other, different schools. Long story short, they scared me, made me think the whole sport was a lot more dangerous than I perceived it to be (I am very safe rider, too), and confused me. So I came back to CSS, and once again made startling improvements. CSS provides a safe, organized, and very well planned day in a program that works very, very well. Many other schools focus on "making you safe" whilst simultaneously scaring the pants off you by telling you all the things you COULD do wrong that MIGHT lead to disaster. CSS shows you how to do it right, get solid control of your motorycle and know exactly how to make it do what you want. Speed comes along with that, if you want it to.

 

Personally, I never need to be reminded to slow down and not ride over my head - I was never willing to go fast until I was sure I knew how to control the bike, CSS gave me that knowledge, now I go fast and still never ride over my head. I've never felt pushed, rushed, confused, or scared at a CSS day, and I've made BIG improvements every time.

 

Yes, come on out to VIR! I'll be there, August 17 & 18, come say hi - look for a lady with long brown hair who looks really happy to be there, that's me. smile.gif

 

Ya see, I told ya. :-)

 

Great post Hotfoot.

 

Bullet

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HotFoot, Bullet, and Kevin, I really appreciate you providing me with your invaluable insights. Every post I read from you guys put me at more at ease.

I went ahead and signed up for the 18th at VIR. August 17th was completely booked sad.gif

My fault for not posting here sooner.

 

Thanks again for all your help.

 

-Ardi

 

I'd appreciate if the instructors could give me their comments on the following.

I've been riding for about 8 years now (on and off). I've attended many track schools and in all of them I was recognized as one of the safest riders in the class. Unfortunately, I haven't been able to improve my track skills in any of those schools that much. One of the head instructors in one of those famous track schools told me: "I always have to remind students in the class to slow down and try not to get over their heads, but you are the only one that I have to tell to go faster!"

 

I gave up on riding on the track, accepting that I might never get very good at it, but I just found out that there is room in the two single day course at VIR in August. Do you think I should give it another shot?

 

 

I went to a CSS school, Level 1, my first time on racetrack. I started out really slow and had great improvements. I improved so much that I decided riding on the track was fun, and that I could someday get good at it. Then I went to a couple of other, different schools. Long story short, they scared me, made me think the whole sport was a lot more dangerous than I perceived it to be (I am very safe rider, too), and confused me. So I came back to CSS, and once again made startling improvements. CSS provides a safe, organized, and very well planned day in a program that works very, very well. Many other schools focus on "making you safe" whilst simultaneously scaring the pants off you by telling you all the things you COULD do wrong that MIGHT lead to disaster. CSS shows you how to do it right, get solid control of your motorycle and know exactly how to make it do what you want. Speed comes along with that, if you want it to.

 

Personally, I never need to be reminded to slow down and not ride over my head - I was never willing to go fast until I was sure I knew how to control the bike, CSS gave me that knowledge, now I go fast and still never ride over my head. I've never felt pushed, rushed, confused, or scared at a CSS day, and I've made BIG improvements every time.

 

Yes, come on out to VIR! I'll be there, August 17 & 18, come say hi - look for a lady with long brown hair who looks really happy to be there, that's me. smile.gif

 

Ya see, I told ya. :-)

 

Great post Hotfoot.

 

Bullet

 

Now, that's great news. You be sure to tell us how it goes now? We'll be looking forward to hearing what you got from the day.

 

Now, most important thing for you Ardi. If on the rare off chance you're are having a bad day, you're not getting something or you're unsure about something, please just mention it, tell em Bullet said you should wink.gif . The guys/team will endeavour to make sure they cater to make sure you do have a great day. Can you make sure that you'll commit to that too? I doubt you'll need to, but it's important just to mention it to you. Your experience matters a lot to us.

 

Bullet

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Now, that's great news. You be sure to tell us how it goes now? We'll be looking forward to hearing what you got from the day.

 

Now, most important thing for you Ardi. If on the rare off chance you're are having a bad day, you're not getting something or you're unsure about something, please just mention it, tell em Bullet said you should wink.gif . The guys/team will endeavour to make sure they cater to make sure you do have a great day. Can you make sure that you'll commit to that too? I doubt you'll need to, but it's important just to mention it to you. Your experience matters a lot to us.

 

Bullet

 

Bullet,

 

I have a very good feeling about this class. I promise to take full advantage of this course and will let you know about my experience. The problem now, is that there are 6 more days to the 18th and I can hardly wait :)

 

thank you so much,

Ardi

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HotFoot, Bullet, and Kevin, I really appreciate you providing me with your invaluable insights. Every post I read from you guys put me at more at ease.

I went ahead and signed up for the 18th at VIR. August 17th was completely booked :(

My fault for not posting here sooner.

Hi Ardi,

 

Why don't you give the office a ring and ask about the 17th? - all it'll cost you is a phone call and you just might be lucky enough to get an extra seat.

 

I did exactly that last year when I was in the same position: instead of driving 900miles each way between from Copenhagen, Denmark to Silverstone UK for just one day, I rang the UK office and got a spot for Level 3 and Level 4, so I could do at least two days.

 

It's great that you're not giving up - I can definitely relate to the "too safe" driving on the track and a slow learner/improver.

Part of the reason that I'm very cautious is that I had an track accident that cost me 20-30% of the vision on my left eye back in 1998 and it's really ingrained in the that I don't want another accident like that (note: this was 11 years before my first CSS course, and entirely of my own fault).

 

All the best,

 

Kai

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I'd appreciate if the instructors could give me their comments on the following.

I've been riding for about 8 years now (on and off). I've attended many track schools and in all of them I was recognized as one of the safest riders in the class. Unfortunately, I haven't been able to improve my track skills in any of those schools that much. One of the head instructors in one of those famous track schools told me: "I always have to remind students in the class to slow down and try not to get over their heads, but you are the only one that I have to tell to go faster!"

 

I gave up on riding on the track, accepting that I might never get very good at it, but I just found out that there is room in the two single day course at VIR in August. Do you think I should give it another shot?

 

 

Slowest1.

I took level 1 at NJMP NJ. to add to the comments posted here is that after each sessions you are going to have a briefing with your coach.

You are going to get feed backs as well as your own personal input base on the session. It is hard for me to put it into words but the end result is you are going to know what you need to work on. Furthermore, you will find out how good the coaches are, that the minimum thing that needs to be corrected they are going to spot it right away. I tell you that because it happened to me . In one of the sessions (3rd one) I got tense in a couple turns and I do not know how but the coach (Pete) noticed it right away. Immediately he pointed it out to me. From then on everytime I take a turn the first thing I do is relax. The other one was the position of my head when turning. Because of that class, I am a better rider and very consciuos of my skills when I ride on the streets. My agresiveness are gone. Planning to take level 2 and 3. Good luck to you and have fun.

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Hi Ardi!

 

Thanks for coming over to say hi at the school, it was great to meet you! Sorry we didn't have a chance to chat longer, I looked for you again a little later in the day and didn't find you. It sounded like things were going well for you when I saw you, how did the rest of your day go?

 

I had a blast, personally, despite the rather steamy temperatures - VIR is a wonderful track!! Plus I had some terrific improvements in my riding, and that feeling of accomplishment is fantastic. We certainly lucked out on the weather, it was raining cats and dogs in the morning but amazingly cleared up completely (and DRIED!) in time for our first session on track.

 

I really hope it went well for you, please post and let us all know.

 

Hotfoot

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Hi Hotfoot,

 

It was great meeting you too! Sorry I caught you during your off-track break and I appreciate you taking time and chatting with me. I arrived at VIR the night before the class and the weather did not look good at all but as soon as the level I group started suiting up for the track, the rain stopped and the track started drying up. Besides the steamy weather, couldn't ask for a more perfect condition :)

 

 

During just one day at the school, I improved my riding and renewed my passion for riding on the track. The level structure of the school, allows slow learners like me to focus on improving certain set of skills without getting overwhelmed.

 

I was also lucky to have JT as my coach. The man is a natural born teacher. I can't remember the last time when I was able to finish my entire track session, due to physical exhaustion. I always came to the pit lane during the last two laps of the session. Thanks to JT, I fixed my body positioning and actually finished the rest of my sessions and still had energy left for more. I learned a lot, had a blast, and definitely look forward to my level II after perfecting the routines from level I.

 

I just wanted to thank everyone on this thread, Kevin, Bullet, Kai, Razor, and off course Hotfoot for encouraging me not go give up and give this course a try. I'm glad I listened to all of you. May the good karma be with you :)

 

 

Hi Ardi!

 

Thanks for coming over to say hi at the school, it was great to meet you! Sorry we didn't have a chance to chat longer, I looked for you again a little later in the day and didn't find you. It sounded like things were going well for you when I saw you, how did the rest of your day go?

 

I had a blast, personally, despite the rather steamy temperatures - VIR is a wonderful track!! Plus I had some terrific improvements in my riding, and that feeling of accomplishment is fantastic. We certainly lucked out on the weather, it was raining cats and dogs in the morning but amazingly cleared up completely (and DRIED!) in time for our first session on track.

 

I really hope it went well for you, please post and let us all know.

 

Hotfoot

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Great news my friend, I'm glad you went, and you've clearly seen the benefits of our school program. It's always great to hear of such stories, turning people who've had bad experiences into real converts to structured coaching and training.

 

Glad to have helped in my very small way. You and your coach JT did the real work.

 

Keep practising, and we'll look forward to many more posts from you, questions, stories and such on your progress.

 

Bullet

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Hi Hotfoot,

 

It was great meeting you too! Sorry I caught you during your off-track break and I appreciate you taking time and chatting with me. I arrived at VIR the night before the class and the weather did not look good at all but as soon as the level I group started suiting up for the track, the rain stopped and the track started drying up. Besides the steamy weather, couldn't ask for a more perfect condition :)

 

 

During just one day at the school, I improved my riding and renewed my passion for riding on the track. The level structure of the school, allows slow learners like me to focus on improving certain set of skills without getting overwhelmed.

 

I was also lucky to have JT as my coach. The man is a natural born teacher. I can't remember the last time when I was able to finish my entire track session, due to physical exhaustion. I always came to the pit lane during the last two laps of the session. Thanks to JT, I fixed my body positioning and actually finished the rest of my sessions and still had energy left for more. I learned a lot, had a blast, and definitely look forward to my level II after perfecting the routines from level I.

 

I just wanted to thank everyone on this thread, Kevin, Bullet, Kai, Razor, and off course Hotfoot for encouraging me not go give up and give this course a try. I'm glad I listened to all of you. May the good karma be with you :)

 

 

I am so pleased to hear that you had fun and made improvements, and that you are excited about track riding again! Thanks for letting us know.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hello Slowest1,

 

Good for you to know so well who you are and what you feel comfortable doing. If you are already safe and already understand and can run a good line on demand, the next "race" skill might be accelerating out of the turns. This could be the safest, most fun way to have a good time on a motorcycle! After all, you've already made the turn, all you need to do is learn to twist the throttle a bit harder AFTER the apex. Those acceleration Gs sure feel nice.

 

Since the bike is coming up as you are adding throttle, this is fairly safe. Some people get carried away and slam the throttle open too early, but that probably won't be you. (I saw a YouTube video of a guy riding his brand new Kawasaki Z1000 on a mountain road. He snapped open the throttle, hit the apex and ran over a patch of sand all at the same time. The result wasn't pretty.) By working on accelerating a little harder AFTER the apex, you can still enter the turns at your same, safe, comfortable speed, ease on some throttle to stabilize the bike, and take the same wide, safe, comfortable line are used to riding.

 

I don't think maximizing acceleration out of corners is something that's covered in Level I, but you can certainly ask to your CSS instructor about it. They'll look at your riding and have a much better idea of what you need than my Wild-As-Guesses. Good luck. Maybe I'll see you at CSS in 2011.

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all you need to do is learn to twist the throttle a bit harder AFTER the apex. Those acceleration Gs sure feel nice.

 

 

 

Crash I think you may want to read the Twist books/watch the DVD and/or attend a CSS school because I reckon that theory may changesmile.gif , you may find that we should crack the and roll on the throttle as soon as possible, doesnt matter where the apex is if you can get on the throttle early why wait for an apex? Open the throttle wide open once the bike is coming out of the turn, like you said, otherwise its a bit like being a drag bike racer, straight line speed only no corner speed unless your coming hotsmile.gif

 

Like the good book says if your getting on the gas asap it means less time braking and coasting which means your faster overall, something like thatbiggrin.gif

 

Dylan

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You are right, of course, Dylan: Throttle Rule Number One. Then, as the narrator in the "Twist II" DVD says, "... at some point, you can PIN IT!"

 

Hi Crash106,

 

I had to ride two hours to get to a very good twisty roads where I could practice my Level I drills. I'm a lot more comfortable with my corner entry and lines now than I used to. I'm hoping to focus on increase my speed as I perfect the level I skills. I have to confess that I am counting down to that day tongue.gif.

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