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A bit off our normal subject matter, but I think related so I'm going to ask anyway:

 

How many of you sleep really well? Both enough sleep and quality of it? If you don't, how does this effect your performance (could be in anything for that matter)? Have any of you had low sleep for long periods of time, weeks, months, years even?

 

Best,

CF

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A bit off our normal subject matter, but I think related so I'm going to ask anyway:

 

How many of you sleep really well? Both enough sleep and quality of it? If you don't, how does this effect your performance (could be in anything for that matter)? Have any of you had low sleep for long periods of time, weeks, months, years even?

 

Best,

CF

I haven't had a really good night sleep since I crashed last August. Since the main injury is in my neck, it is hard to get a comfortable sleeping position. I'm not entirely sure I know how it's affecting my performance, but I do know I'm not operating at my peak. I'm still waiting on MRI results from last week, but I'm hoping I'll soon have a medical plan which will speed up my recovery. I do take an occasional ride, even though the doctors recommend against it, but I'm just really eager to get back to riding full time.

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It would be interesting to learn why you're asking, Cobie.

 

I have been sleep deprived basically since 1997, when our then 2 y.o. kid was diagnozed with diabetes. Not only does that mean between four and 6.5 hrs of sleep every night depending on his condition and need for attention, but because one has to keep a regular lifestyle, there isn't much chance to sleep extra during the weekends, either. As he's grown older, I have begun to sneak in 30-60 minutes of sleep most days after work, which helps a lot.

 

How does it affect me? Lack of energy and an urge to fall asleep whenever something's going on that isn't really interesting. Business meetings are the absolute worst, especially when I'm just supposed to be there and listen. Reduced ability to concentrate is also a downside to not getting enough sleep. OTOH, the body do adapt and I have been able to function quite well over the years, although I haven't been able to perform at my very best. That also apply to my workouts, and there is no doubt that less sleep over time also mean less power and longer time to recuperate.

 

In conclusion, I would say that in order for people to get the most out of a CSS weekend - as I presume that's what probably holds the greatest interest among the readers - paying great attention into getting enough sleep AND eating properly* for at least the final 3 or 4 days before the first session is vital.

 

Brad, as a bloke who have suffered a couple of neck injuries myself, let me suggest you try some simple movements that helped me to a new and virtually pain free life literally within a couple of weeks. I start out like this: Lay flat on the floor, arms along your side, and lift your head only until your chin hits your chest. Repeat until tired, but I found little bonus going above 50 repetitions. After completing this, lay on your side and let your head hang down towards the floor then raise it towards the upper shoulder. Again, work up to 50 repetitions. Turn to the other side and repeat. Finally, stand on all four and raise your head as far back as you can and let it come back so that chin meets chest. Another 50 reps will do. I was also adviced not to stretch my neck, only to do these gentle strengthening exercises. And they worked absolute wonders for me. At first, I did them every other day, but after one week I did them every day. Now I only do them for a week or two if my neck starts to become a little sore, which is very rare these days, I'm happy to report.

 

* Avoid big meals, avoid food high in sugar and fat, eat lots of complex carbs as well as fruit and vegetables spread over 6-8 small meals per day. Snack on the days you attend school to keep your blood suger even. Drink lots of water during the day. Plenty of information on sports nutrition can be found online that will give a lot more details if you want. You are what you eat, and trying to digest a big steak while operating a motorcycle at high speed is not ideal ;)

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Brad, as a bloke who have suffered a couple of neck injuries myself, let me suggest you try some simple movements that helped me to a new and virtually pain free life literally within a couple of weeks. I start out like this: Lay flat on the floor, arms along your side, and lift your head only until your chin hits your chest. Repeat until tired, but I found little bonus going above 50 repetitions. After completing this, lay on your side and let your head hang down towards the floor then raise it towards the upper shoulder. Again, work up to 50 repetitions. Turn to the other side and repeat. Finally, stand on all four and raise your head as far back as you can and let it come back so that chin meets chest. Another 50 reps will do. I was also adviced not to stretch my neck, only to do these gentle strengthening exercises. And they worked absolute wonders for me. At first, I did them every other day, but after one week I did them every day. Now I only do them for a week or two if my neck starts to become a little sore, which is very rare these days, I'm happy to report.

 

* Avoid big meals, avoid food high in sugar and fat, eat lots of complex carbs as well as fruit and vegetables spread over 6-8 small meals per day. Snack on the days you attend school to keep your blood suger even. Drink lots of water during the day. Plenty of information on sports nutrition can be found online that will give a lot more details if you want. You are what you eat, and trying to digest a big steak while operating a motorcycle at high speed is not ideal ;)

No offense meant, but two things I don't take from internet forums are advice on medical problems or nutritional issues. These things are usually given with the best of intention, but seeing as no one knows my medical history, food allergies, etc., I think it most unwise...

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Fair enough - and point taken. I should have made it clear that each and one needs to make sure to consult their doctor first, even if it should go without saying as each person best know themselves. I'll do my best to include a notion next time

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I was interested to know if this was common, or not. I had sleep issues for years (turns out there were more causes than just one).

 

My main reason in starting this thread was to find out if it was common, or not. Eirik's problem (of having to get up to handle family) is not quite the normal, as it's a valid interruption, have to get up.

 

Are there others that don't sleep enough, either hard to get to sleep or wake up and can't get back to sleep?

 

I had some success with different supplements (Chinese Herbs, tryptopan-sure i spelled that wrong, etc.). But not one has been a real slam dunk. Also read some stuff on the medical sleep aids, and won't take them.

 

CF

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Have you tried Relaxation techniques? Much better than medication because it will only get better with time, whereas meds - be that natural substances or man made - tend to lose efficiency over time. Also, for somebody like you with your experience in following drills in your line of work, it should be easy to learn.

 

There are several ways and methods, but here is a simple one: Lay on your back, feet about a foot apart, arms along the side, head comfortably resting on your pillow. Try to think of nothing. Clench your fists and tension your arms as hard as you can for ten seconds while holding your breath. Relax, take a breath or two and repeat. Do 3 full cycles. Relaxing the final time, feel how your fingers straightens out slowly, usually in a jerky fashion. Once hands are fully relaxed, focus on your feet. Concentrate on relaxing them. Once they are relaxed, they will also feel nice and warm. Continue to your calfs, make sure they are relaxed. You may feel muscles relaxes in steps, or they may minutely tense up a bit before suddenly letting go and becoming totally relaxed. Continue to your tighs. When legs and feet are fully relaxed, they should feel very heavy, like it would take a lot of effort to move them. As you get used to the technique, you could very well be asleep at this point. If not, continue with buttocks, stomach, back, chest, shoulders and arms.

 

Like most things in life, it takes some time to master. Some will notice effect on their first attempt, others may have to work on it for a couple of weeks. The reward will be sound sleep if you are persistent. Also, if you do not fancy my way, there are plenty of others out there.

 

Another important step in order to get control over your sleep issues is to retain a total regularity when it comes to sleep. Always go to bed at the same time and stay there until it is time to get up, whether you sleep or not. Don't fret if you cannot sleep; stress only makes sleeping harder. Think of the bed as your friend and tell yourself you're looking forward getting into it. Let's say you decide, at first, to go to bed at midnight and stay in bed until five in the morning. Even if you don't fall asleep until 4, get up at six. Don't be afraid that this will be murder, your body will soon adapt and make you fall asleep sooner once you follow a steady pattern 7 days a week. After some time, days or a couple of weeks, you will fall asleep quite easily and sleep until the alarm goes off. When you do, you can begin to lengthen the period in bed until you get the amount of sleep you need, typically 7-8 hours.

 

I hope this helps. Or rather, I'm pretty darn sure it does help. Staying relaxed, sticking to a routine and don't worry if there are nights when sleep don't come will help virtually everybody.

 

Note: You should consult your doctor before trying anything you've learned of the internet :D

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For me, the problem (and solutions) were more physical. It took me a while to find out that it was my intestines that were keeping me up, in the very early hours--I would go to sleep OK, but wake up and unable to return to sleep. This was a digestion issue, and getting help with that made a huge difference.

 

Another thing that made a difference was some different supplements. Here I'll admit that I have tried MANY things over the years. A recent line of supplements has given the best results (they are a very new brand, just out). Powdered, absorb really well, I can tell a difference, and sleep is dramtically improved. Happy to pass that info along, PM or e-mail me.

 

Another factor is enough exercise, and the right kind of exercise. Mild light cardio by itself doesn't cut it for me, and per a training program I'm trying (Dr. Al Sears, PACE method), it's not good for you anyway. Maybe that will be whole thread if anyone is interested in that.

 

CF

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Another factor is enough exercise, and the right kind of exercise. Mild light cardio by itself doesn't cut it for me, and per a training program I'm trying (Dr. Al Sears, PACE method), it's not good for you anyway. Maybe that will be whole thread if anyone is interested in that.

We could probably fill the entire forum with debate over best practices for diet and exercise :)

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  • 2 months later...

I take vitamin B12 methylcobalamin 1 hr before bed .Mood and sleep moderator.

http://sleeptips4u.b...itamin-b12.html

 

Also i take food enzymes with every meal( our body naturally makes less enzymes as we age) so the starches,fats and proteins are being broken down propererly and my stomach doesn`t get in the way of my performance on the bike if food issues may arrise.

i.e bloating,acid reflux, etc..

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