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Bike Shake/wabble


Obtik6
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Been trying to figure out what I'm doing wrong here, I'm starting to think its me being to hard on the throttle.

 

Was riding on some curvy back roads the couple days ago, usually when im going fast ill lay on the tank, so i have no arm pressure on the handle bars and try and avoid wind resistance. various turns, i was getting a pretty nasty wobble/shake on my exits. I honestly ignored it and kept accelerating and it stabilized, Im thinking its being created at 10k-14k curve on the s1000. then yesterday i hit a straight away, and again, and noticed it heavy to slightly on varies gears and was on that same curve, but i cant say its completely a high speed wobble (at 160-170+ it stabilized) its occurring more from high acceleration/load on the bike. On the straight away, i do snap straight to WOT from 1st-2nd and up, and sometimes will even occur for gear change. Im probably going to check it out a couple more times to verify and try and figure it out, I wanna make sure its not me, before i blame the bike.

 

the question is; is this my throttle control, being to aggressive with it? Or do i need to adjust my suspension? I really cant see it being my position, since I'm pretty light on the handle bars, and i wanna say my weight distribution is pretty well balanced when I'm laying on the tank. (unless I'm not aware of something I'm doing)

 

If it is throttle control; I wont lie, From a smooth roll on, to snapping to WOT when my tire patch are flat, will always feel the fastest for the bike(but i do understand what it does to the suspension) I can see a smooth roll on needs to be more aggressive and timed so by the end im at or near WOT (which i cant be doing safely on back roads lol) but from a stand still or slower roll to high acceleration, would the same rule apply?

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I don't want to be the sour puss here, but I hope your reference to curvy roads and 160-170+ (I assume mph) was not a reference to how you ride outside a racetrack environment, although at this point I do assume it was. That is a good way to wind up dead, and you may quite possibly take someone with you.

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Thank you Dark, great video. really appreciate it. definitely gonna keep a closer eye on my arm pressure, does make sense. answered my WOT after my lean question through TOTW2.

 

 

 

 

I don't want to be the sour puss here, but I hope your reference to curvy roads and 160-170+ (I assume mph) was not a reference to how you ride outside a racetrack environment, although at this point I do assume it was. That is a good way to wind up dead, and you may quite possibly take someone with you.

 

Totally understandable, your completely right. I wont lie though, with rarely seeing to many track days at Road America, or Blackhawk right now. Its the only way i can analyze myself and my bike. I'm not doing this to at all show off to anyone, I'm doing everything i can to learn as safe as possible with what is available to me. These are not at all populated, covered or poor visual roads. The curvy sections, i take very conservatively more looking at my positioning, handling and throttle control of the bike. I still am using stock tires, and up here we still have pebbles, dirt, lots of deer and random animals that are on roads, is i am no wear near uncontrollable on these roads. As for the 160-170+ push, its a wide open field around a road, with nothing that could interfere without me seeing it first. I would never risk anyone else's life ever, especially for a simple adrenaline rush.

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Like Dark Suzuki said, when we're under hard acceleration, we're usually getting pushed to the back of the bike, and we are actually holding on to the bars. It's hard to get a good position (BP) at that point, so this doesn't happen and takes a lot of work on BP to get right. I never use steering dampers, but think before you crank down on that thing and cause changes to every other aspect of turning, you should try to minimize that shaking with better BP. Let us know what you try to change it and what works and what doesn't.

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I was thinking that even if your hands are lose on the bars, your arms could still interfere by being locked in the shoulders or having elbows resting against the tank. In addition, modern bikes are made for quick turning more than high speed stability. That means anything out of perfect can have a noticeable impact on stability; wheel alignment, wheel balance, steering head bearings, wheel bearings, rider weight and position all have the ability to cause issues if not spot on.

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Odd tehcnique leaning on the tank. Try locking your bottom half with your feet/thighs on tank and supporting your top half with your back. You can't grip with your chest so I'm thinking your making involuntary inputs becauseof it. Crouch over, elbows bent, usual thing.

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Like Dark Suzuki said, when we're under hard acceleration, we're usually getting pushed to the back of the bike, and we are actually holding on to the bars. It's hard to get a good position (BP) at that point, so this doesn't happen and takes a lot of work on BP to get right. I never use steering dampers, but think before you crank down on that thing and cause changes to every other aspect of turning, you should try to minimize that shaking with better BP. Let us know what you try to change it and what works and what doesn't.

 

Definitely makes sense, will have to check it out. last couple days been hard with the rain, cant be as aggressive on her. Hardest part about my bp, is i cant necessarily see what or how I'm positioned. Just have to feel it out, maybe just position myself differently each reenactment and see how each feels.

 

I was thinking that even if your hands are lose on the bars, your arms could still interfere by being locked in the shoulders or having elbows resting against the tank. In addition, modern bikes are made for quick turning more than high speed stability. That means anything out of perfect can have a noticeable impact on stability; wheel alignment, wheel balance, steering head bearings, wheel bearings, rider weight and position all have the ability to cause issues if not spot on.

 

Completely agree, does make sense.. I wont lie first couple times i cranked on her, It left my brain 3 feet behind the bike. Were i needed get used to and comprehend or anticipate the speed of the bike. the wobble doesn't concern me as much as i want to understand why it is happening. I trust the bike, It handles to me like a smaller bike, and definitely is handling high speeds very well without modifications.

 

Odd tehcnique leaning on the tank. Try locking your bottom half with your feet/thighs on tank and supporting your top half with your back. You can't grip with your chest so I'm thinking your making involuntary inputs becauseof it. Crouch over, elbows bent, usual thing.

 

When i lay on the tank, I completely leave my support to my bottom half. Leaning/laying on the tank helps me anticipate and counter the force from the acceleration of the bike with out a strain or use of energy. Im using my thighs, squeezing them for stopping, and when i lean, also for shifting my body position prior to the turns. Keep in mind these are not knee dragging turns either. For endurance riding(2-3 hours). i find that keeping my upper body higher puts strain on different parts of my body especially over long periods of time(my throttle hand go numb is a big one). ill definitely keep your comment in mind and try different things, when i watch racing i do notice exactly what your saying. Maybe i just need to build my back muscles to hold that and im just building lazy bad habits lol.

 

 

Thank you for your replies guys, been very helpful. rereading TOTW2 this week, laughed is a as soon as i hit chapter 8-9 i think i definitely been finding my answers. Its just Trial and error, think ill figure it out soon enough. Rainy week been holding me back from rein-acting the situation. ill definitely keep you guys posted on any fixes i find.

 

Blaine

 

 

 

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Okay, since Brad hinted at it but no one has really said it...

You are an idiot!

 

Pulling that high speed ###### on a public road (and I don't care how rural it is), it's completely stupid and someone should strongly consider putting a foot up your backside!

 

###### happens! People DO get hit by lightning and people DO win the lottery (which is close to the chances of lightning). You don't know what's going to happen, people die that way dude!!!! Ya get it??

 

Take it to a track or don't bother!

 

(Parental lecture over) :rolleyes:

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Okay, since Brad hinted at it but no one has really said it...

You are an idiot!

 

Pulling that high speed ###### on a public road (and I don't care how rural it is), it's completely stupid and someone should strongly consider putting a foot up your backside!

 

###### happens! People DO get hit by lightning and people DO win the lottery (which is close to the chances of lightning). You don't know what's going to happen, people die that way dude!!!! Ya get it??

 

Take it to a track or don't bother!

 

(Parental lecture over) :rolleyes:

 

Well that's your opinion, but definitely doesn't go with what the topic is, please keep with the topic.... no one likes insults, no matter what they say. keep them to yourself please.

 

 

Blaine

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Well, I have seen and know of stuff that has happened: deer, dogs, cars, kids on bikes, cows, etc. I grew up in the country, I've spent time on rural roads, I know what can be there. At 160mph, how much ground will you cover in a second?

 

I'm not trying to beat you up on this, and it's not a commentary on your skill, just the playing field.

 

One of the jobs I used to have was working on film sets. I was young and just liked to run. What I found out was that no one was ever expecting that. It might also be like going to an archery range with a high power rifle, that's not what the rest are doing.

 

Something to consider.

 

Best,

Cobie

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Well, I have seen and know of stuff that has happened: deer, dogs, cars, kids on bikes, cows, etc. I grew up in the country, I've spent time on rural roads, I know what can be there. At 160mph, how much ground will you cover in a second?

 

I'm not trying to beat you up on this, and it's not a commentary on your skill, just the playing field.

 

One of the jobs I used to have was working on film sets. I was young and just liked to run. What I found out was that no one was ever expecting that. It might also be like going to an archery range with a high power rifle, that's not what the rest are doing.

 

Something to consider.

 

Best,

Cobie

 

 

Definitely, well ill do what ever i can to get myself to a track and practice there.

 

Blaine

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I know that i'll get shot down for this but I use to do that stuff to. I'd push my limits on the public roads thinking that was the only place that i could. then i discovered trackdays and never looked back. I ride on the track more than the roads now. but laying into people that still push the limits on the road is not the answer. getting them to more trackdays is. Blaine, dont worry, your not the first and you wont be the last.

 

just try and keep the testing and limit pushing on the track instead.

 

just my 2c

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I have a friend, father of 3, 49 years old, who rides his RF900 in a similar manner. He loves to get up early and head for the mountains on his old Suzuki. He will reach speeds of 170 mph. Roads are rural and not a lot of population, but there could always be the (drunk?) driver out early in the morning. Not to mention deer and elk. At least it will be quick if his luck runs out one day and he hits anything.

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Judging by his photo, I'm guessing Blaine is a grown-up. Where he does his riding doesn't change the way the bike works. Let's all worry about how the bike works and not so much how he lives his life. I can spend 5 minutes with each of you and preach for 2 hours how every one of you are "idiots" regarding how you live your lives. I don't remember him asking what each of us thinks about where he does his riding, but about what the bike is doing under acceleration.

 

Any of you who say that you haven't sped, gotten greedy with the throttle, or just twisted that wrist on a sweet corner on a public road are liars. Let's all be bigger than calling each other "idiots." Such comments, blasting people (or whatever you want to call it) on the internet, and insulting people isn't why I come onto this site. Ignorant comments, like calling people idiots and getting preachy isn't going to fix a thing. You'll just turn this site into any other standard site. Plus it makes you a hypocrite.

 

Let's move on.

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Been trying to figure out what I'm doing wrong here, I'm starting to think its me being to hard on the throttle.

 

Was riding on some curvy back roads the couple days ago, usually when im going fast ill lay on the tank, so i have no arm pressure on the handle bars and try and avoid wind resistance. various turns, i was getting a pretty nasty wobble/shake on my exits. I honestly ignored it and kept accelerating and it stabilized, Im thinking its being created at 10k-14k curve on the s1000. then yesterday i hit a straight away, and again, and noticed it heavy to slightly on varies gears and was on that same curve, but i cant say its completely a high speed wobble (at 160-170+ it stabilized) its occurring more from high acceleration/load on the bike. On the straight away, i do snap straight to WOT from 1st-2nd and up, and sometimes will even occur for gear change. Im probably going to check it out a couple more times to verify and try and figure it out, I wanna make sure its not me, before i blame the bike.

 

the question is; is this my throttle control, being to aggressive with it? Or do i need to adjust my suspension? I really cant see it being my position, since I'm pretty light on the handle bars, and i wanna say my weight distribution is pretty well balanced when I'm laying on the tank. (unless I'm not aware of something I'm doing)

 

If it is throttle control; I wont lie, From a smooth roll on, to snapping to WOT when my tire patch are flat, will always feel the fastest for the bike(but i do understand what it does to the suspension) I can see a smooth roll on needs to be more aggressive and timed so by the end im at or near WOT (which i cant be doing safely on back roads lol) but from a stand still or slower roll to high acceleration, would the same rule apply?

 

Any chance you are getting small wheelies, and feeling a shake when the front wheel touches back down? You mentioned you are on the S1000, and if you are going WOT it may be kicking in the anti-wheelie control. In that case the wheelies are small and very smooth, often I don't even know the wheel is off the ground until it sets back down and I feel a little wiggle as it re-centers itself to the direction of travel. The fact that you notice it at the peak of the power curve, then it stabilizes after that, (and the fact that you say you are loose on the bars), is what makes me wonder if you are just feeling the front wheel settting back down.

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Hey thanks for all the inputs and support guys,

Reread both Twist 1-2, and watching lots of you-tube, its been rainy and crappy all week. Came to the conclusion its me laying on the tank, and my BP has been wrong in a couple ways on the bike. Me being in a way to relaxed/lazy, under hard acceleration my lower support wasn't countering weight shifting on the bike. As my weight was being pulled back by the acceleration I would counter it with my arms on the bars. Enough to cause that small wiggle/shake at least, until my weight shifting matched with the bike, the wiggle/shake would cease. My thoughts were if i was laying that relaxed on the tank i couldn't cause an SR#2 that easily, but i was only looking at the the weight, pushing or stiffening of my arms. I've also never been on something as strong as the s1000rr before.

 

Appreciate everything guys,

Blaine

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It does sound to me like that's the problem. Quote from you earlier:

 

When i lay on the tank, I completely leave my support to my bottom half.

 

(I can't get it to box it all in nicley.) To me if you're laying on teh tank you're not gripping much, as straight away you've taken some weight off other parts of your body. So anyway, work on the BP, if you're going to ride near the limit then you can't sit still!

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