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Wet-Weather Riding


Jaybird180
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I've been watching Casey Stoner for a few years (since he was on LCR Honda). If he's not there, he darned close to the epitome of riding in terms of stabilty and confidence and control on a motorcycle.

 

I'm playing DVR catchup and saw the wet race (British GP). His style is almost like dry race style, with very small exception. But what I noticed mostly was how stable his bike was the entire race.

 

He even had enough control to back it in, and it seemed obvious that he did it on purpose, nevermind the fact that he had a commanding lead.

 

"And that's all I have to say about that." - Forrest Gump

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I agree - Stoner's control in ALL conditions is amazing. He looks as comfortable on that bike as I do sitting on my couch. If / when he is not at pace, you can guarantee it is the bike, not him. He knows exactly what the bike is and is not capable of at (seemingly) all times.

 

He was even able to ride that crappy Ducati... :D

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Above all else, he is relaxed on the bike. Why? One reason is because he is comfortable with SO many things that the bike does, that we are not. His experiences on all types of bikes in all types of conditions, from the time he was a kid, has given him a database (if you will) of personal references.

 

I don't know if that is what separates him from the other "aliens" :D , but it defintely separates him from us mortals.

 

One of the things Keith said last year at CSS about Rossi, was that it was his VISION that truly separated him from the rest of the field. That he saw the track, his lines, other lines, and the other riders' tendencies very clearly and easily. I suppose this also is due to how relaxed and confident he is on the bike.

 

I don't think I answered the question... :P

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One way to do this would be to look at one thing at a time, just one skill. Can you see one skill that he does, and does well? If you have been to the schools, you could look at one of those skills, and match it against someone elses. If you haven't been to a school, have a look at the techniques listed in Twist 2, that would be another way to compare what he does, differently than others.

 

Lets see where this goes...

 

CF

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Thanks Cobie for putting this back on track (no pun intended).

 

Not one thing he does right, but he finds his line early enough to get setup for the line. Once he turns-in the only detectible movement I can see is his right-wrist. He has mastered the "do nothing" drill.

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No apologies necessary. I should have done a better job of communicating where I was going to begin with.

 

B)

 

IMHO throttle control, but I don't know enough to say that that is what sets him apart from the others. He has stated that he is comfortable with the rear tire sliding (and it shows when he rides).

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Good observations.

 

Since body position seems to be a big subject these days, have a look at how well he anchors him self to the bike. Knee/outside leg is nicely along the tank, solid purchase on the bike. A key point in allowing him to do the "do nothing" drill". :).

 

CF

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IMHO throttle control, but I don't know enough to say that that is what sets him apart from the others. He has stated that he is comfortable with the rear tire sliding (and it shows when he rides).

 

I read somewhere that his throttle control was measured and found to be the most consistent amongst the MotoGP gang.

 

A little off topic, but if Josh Hayes keeps going the way he is, he may be a contender for Throttle Control Master. He's in a small group that rides without Traction Control.

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Good observations.

 

Since body position seems to be a big subject these days, have a look at how well he anchors him self to the bike. Knee/outside leg is nicely along the tank, solid purchase on the bike. A key point in allowing him to do the "do nothing" drill". :).

 

CF

Cobie,

Are you suggesting that his position is what pulls the other skills together for him, making them work as a whole?

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Good observations.

 

Since body position seems to be a big subject these days, have a look at how well he anchors him self to the bike. Knee/outside leg is nicely along the tank, solid purchase on the bike. A key point in allowing him to do the "do nothing" drill". :).

 

CF

Cobie,

Are you suggesting that his position is what pulls the other skills together for him, making them work as a whole?

 

JB,

 

It's one skill he has, that's all. In other words, it was commented on how well he does the "do nothing drill" and one way he can do that is the ability he has on the bike to be well anchored. We have been working with students a lot on this...getting this solid goes a long way to helping a number of skills.

 

CF

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Yep, I asked for that (LOL).

 

Seriously, can you think of some others that are worthy of study for this stability quality (any series)?

 

Other riders: just watching some guys last night on the tube: Checa looks pretty darn good on the bike, so does Nori Haga. Rossi and Lorenzo have had good positions for a while too.

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I will watch more carefully next time. I have noticed Nori's style change in recent few years, he doesn't stalk like he used to.

 

I also noticed Pedrosa doesn't lock-in as much as some of the other riders (Spies is pretty locked-in). I wonder if his physical stature is a factor. He moves on the bike mid-corner.

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I noticed that Checa doesn't introduce instability into the bike when changing direction. He is very seamless. I notice another rider seemingly struggle and he is appearing to fight the bike and it's protesting.

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