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Code Vs Weider


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It just dawned on me that in many ways, Keith Code's principles probably are to motorcycling what Joe Weider's principles are to body building. Just like Weider sat down and studied the various aspects of training and what would work - or not - instead of just watching people move iron, so have Code taken the time to understand what makes a motorcycle perform when it comes to handling in ways that nobody even thought about before.

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Interesting comparison Eirik. While I'm only cursorily familiar with Weider's work, this method also reminds me of Sheck Exley. Much like Keith, Sheck literally wrote the book on Cave Diving. He used accident analysis to break down the mistakes made in fatal and near fatal incidents and develop a set of rules and skill sets to address/prevent these issues.

 

As the old saying goes "How do you eat an elephant…one bite at the time". I guess the secret here is knowing where to bite? (Ok so maybe I took that anaolgy one step too far :) ).

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I can tell you that Keith is pretty thorough when it comes to a particular subject. I know that right now he is working on a bunch of material on body positioning. What started as a chapter or three has grown into 10 chapters of very in-depth research on the basics of center of mass, joint position, and other key basics that underlie the whole subject. He consulted physical therapists on various aspects of the skeletal system, muscles, etc. and looked at horse jockeys' relationship with the horses' center of mass and their skeletal systems--differences and similarities with a rider/motorcycle. It goes on and on. I have a list from him of 57 key aspects to good body position on a motorcycle; each one relevant to being stable on a motorcycle. These long lists tend to back people off and consider this pedantic. However, if someone is to truly understand something, and export the knowledge, they are going to have to be thorough and explore all the permutations of that particular subject.

 

He won't just take a photo of the fastest person in GP racing and show it to a student saying: "Look here, that's the right way to do it. Get your head down like that and your arms like this."

 

That would be the key difference between Keith's approach and a "reverse engineering" approach.

 

A good definition of "reverse engineering" is here:

 

Reverse engineering has its origins in the analysis of hardware for commercial or military advantage. The purpose is to deduce design decisions from end products with little or no additional knowledge about the procedures involved in the original production.

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I'm glad to hear how hard he works to understand every aspect of motorcycle riding. Even if his conclusions should be challenged on some aspects, the throurough documentation will make it easier for other experts to chime in with their viewpoints since it's all taken into a scientific context. It also makes it viable for people also outside motorcycling to give their thoughts since Keith now gets more involved with the human physiology than anybody have ever attemtped before. It will be very interesting to see what this will bring when it gets published!

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  • 2 weeks later...
... I know that right now he is working on a bunch of material on body positioning. What started as a chapter or three has grown into 10 chapters of very in-depth research on the basics of center of mass, joint position, and other key basics that underlie the whole subject. He consulted physical therapists on various aspects of the skeletal system, muscles, etc. and looked at horse jockeys' relationship with the horses' center of mass and their skeletal systems--differences and similarities with a rider/motorcycle. It goes on and on. I have a list from him of 57 key aspects to good body position on a motorcycle; each one relevant to being stable on a motorcycle.

 

Wow - that sounds great. It's definitely an advantage to understand how things work. Just like countersteering, everyone does do it but not everyone understands the concept so they can't maximise the advantage. It sounds like the body position info will have a similar kind of affect. Can't wait to see what's in store! biggrin.gif

 

 

 

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  • 2 months later...

I can tell you that Keith is pretty thorough when it comes to a particular subject. I know that right now he is working on a bunch of material on body positioning. What started as a chapter or three has grown into 10 chapters of very in-depth research on the basics of center of mass, joint position, and other key basics that underlie the whole subject. He consulted physical therapists on various aspects of the skeletal system, muscles, etc. and looked at horse jockeys' relationship with the horses' center of mass and their skeletal systems--differences and similarities with a rider/motorcycle. It goes on and on.

 

Pretty much the same approach that ancient martial arts developers had.

 

I would include Burt Rutan in the group of developers and visionaries having that productive and creative approach to a subject:

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Burt_Rutan

 

Kudos to Keith!

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