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Front Tire Skid


jps600rr
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I have noticed when making an aggressive down shift from med RPM to high RPM the front tire skids for

a split second, the back tire is fine, very stable but the front seems out of control for as split second.

Then it regains traction very quickly, and the bike is stable, this happens just before I start to make the bike lean.

 

James.

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I have noticed when making an aggressive down shift from med RPM to high RPM the front tire skids for

a split second, the back tire is fine, very stable but the front seems out of control for as split second.

Then it regains traction very quickly, and the bike is stable, this happens just before I start to make the bike lean.

 

James.

 

 

While hard on the brakes? maybe, but still highly unlikely.

 

A front tire skid on a race tire that is up to temp is VERY hard to do. About the only way you can do it is to bottom the suspension and then 'pogo' the front end where it hops off the ground a bit. Otherwise, you're more likely to go over the bars...

 

now I'm not outright calling you a 'liar', but I really think that if you had some video you would see something different from a front end slide/skid...

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I have noticed when making an aggressive down shift from med RPM to high RPM the front tire skids for

a split second, the back tire is fine, very stable but the front seems out of control for as split second.

Then it regains traction very quickly, and the bike is stable, this happens just before I start to make the bike lean.

 

James.

 

 

While hard on the brakes? maybe, but still highly unlikely.

 

A front tire skid on a race tire that is up to temp is VERY hard to do. About the only way you can do it is to bottom the suspension and then 'pogo' the front end where it hops off the ground a bit. Otherwise, you're more likely to go over the bars...

 

now I'm not outright calling you a 'liar', but I really think that if you had some video you would see something different from a front end slide/skid...

 

 

Not I can clearly hear the skid, no brakes

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I have noticed when making an aggressive down shift from med RPM to high RPM the front tire skids for

a split second, the back tire is fine, very stable but the front seems out of control for as split second.

Then it regains traction very quickly, and the bike is stable, this happens just before I start to make the bike lean.

 

James.

 

 

While hard on the brakes? maybe, but still highly unlikely.

 

A front tire skid on a race tire that is up to temp is VERY hard to do. About the only way you can do it is to bottom the suspension and then 'pogo' the front end where it hops off the ground a bit. Otherwise, you're more likely to go over the bars...

 

now I'm not outright calling you a 'liar', but I really think that if you had some video you would see something different from a front end slide/skid...

 

 

Not I can clearly hear the skid, no brakes

I,ve got to agree even a badly set bike shouldn't unload the front end whilst on the brakes.Are you sure you are not doing something with the bars or the brake lever when you're blipping the throttle.ie tensing your arms or releasing the brake lever enough to let the front pop back on you.
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  • 2 weeks later...

If under downshifting there is a front tire skid, how is it happening? The front won't skid unless the brakes are being used (front brakes). Sure you aren't feeling a rear wheel skid? Or, as mentioned earlier, doing sometihng with the brake lever?

 

Best,

Cobie

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If under downshifting there is a front tire skid, how is it happening? The front won't skid unless the brakes are being used (front brakes). Sure you aren't feeling a rear wheel skid? Or, as mentioned earlier, doing sometihng with the brake lever?

 

Best,

Cobie

 

 

Thanks, It is most likley a rear, and front skid, downshifting, and applying front brake at the same time.

It only happens for a very short space of time, just before I turn in.

You tend to notice the front more in this situation.

Better come to school before I get too carried away.

 

Thanks. James.

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It doesn't sound like this is what is happening to you, but I have had the sensation of the front slipping at turn in (not just before.)

 

In my case this was caused by improper body position causing me to put inputs to the bars that I didn't know I was putting.

 

It was very frustrating because I couldn't figure out why it was happening. I checked the bike from top to bottom and worked with the suspension - still doing it.

 

Finally, I started thinking about what I was doing at turn in and went out, going over the same set of turns over and over, until I figured out that I was creating the sensation with improper inputs.

 

I changed my body position and all was well.

 

Problem solved (for me)!

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James,

 

There is a really good chapter on braking in Twist of the Wrist 1, chapter 8, even has drawings on the downshifting part, might want to check that out.

 

Best,

CF

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James,

 

There is a really good chapter on braking in Twist of the Wrist 1, chapter 8, even has drawings on the downshifting part, might want to check that out.

 

Best,

CF

 

 

I am downshifing at too higher speed, some people say downshift first, but if your speed is too high, then

you need to brake first and then downshift.

 

James.

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I am downshifing at too higher speed, some people say downshift first, but if your speed is too high, then

you need to brake first and then downshift.

 

James.

 

James--ALWAYS brake first. Scrub some speed off, then you don't have to rev the motor as high to match the rpms. Guys that can do this well don't even have to use the clutch on the downshift.

 

Downshifting first is very hard on the bike--chain, clutch, engine.

 

Brake pads are cheap, and meant to slow the bike, so don't use the engine as a brake.

 

Make sense?

 

CF

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I am downshifing at too higher speed, some people say downshift first, but if your speed is too high, then

you need to brake first and then downshift.

 

James.

 

James--ALWAYS brake first. Scrub some speed off, then you don't have to rev the motor as high to match the rpms. Guys that can do this well don't even have to use the clutch on the downshift.

 

Downshifting first is very hard on the bike--chain, clutch, engine.

 

Brake pads are cheap, and meant to slow the bike, so don't use the engine as a brake.

 

Make sense?

 

CF

 

 

 

I understand what you are saying, I do brake first myself but I may be too close to the red line after the downshift.

 

I think the question is how close to the red line/which gear do you want to be in through the corner, depends on how fast you can come out of the corner. The 1000 seems to be much more flexible compared to the 600.

 

James.

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I want to be as far away as possible from the redline after a downshift.

 

Redline is where I up shift.

 

On the racetrack, I want my downshift to place me at the beginning of the powerband for that gear... at the perfect place to start accelerating.

 

For instance, on my 400 the powerband begins around 8000 rpm. So I would down shift below that to bring me back up to 8000 rpm. (Rev limit is 15,500 rpm.)

 

If I am downshifting for a slow corner after a fast straightaway, I wait until I am almost finished with my braking and the rev's are down around 3000 rpm or less. After say four or five downshifts, I am in the powerband again and ready to accelerate out of the corner in the appropriate gear.

 

Same thing for normal street riding. I don't downshift until the rpm's drop below usable power.

 

On my 400 that would be around 3000 rpm.

 

The whole point of downshifting is to choose the appropriate gear for my roadspeed that will give me more control of the bike by being able to accelerate.

 

What else would I do with the motor? ;)

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