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Cornering: Body Weight Distribution


avih
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Hi,

After my previous discussion here http://forums.superbikeschool.com/index.php?showtopic=1098 , I figured two things about my body position:

 

- My abdomen is facing straight forward, while in most pics of pro racers it's directed somewhat towards the bike itself (body is a bit twisted).

- My inner ankle is too bent instead of "open", and it carries most of my body weight. It both limits me and not very comfortable.

 

I'm trying to use calf raise, but I still somehow put much of my weight on the inner peg. Also, when I try to take my body out a bit more, I'm losing the calf raise lock of the outer leg and put even more weight on the inner peg.

 

I'm opening a new thread here because my question is very specific and different than my general previous post: While you hang off the bike, how is your body weight distributed? i.e. what points of contact would be the hardest to "take apart"? Do you put much weight on the arm resting on the fuel tank? do you feel much weight on the inner peg (i.e. can you take it off the peg relatively easy and still keep the BP)? do you try to put most of the weight on the outer leg? maybe the thigh on the seat? etc. I figure the handlebars carry as little as no weight at all.

 

I'm guessing this subject has been mentioned, but I couldn't find relevant posts. If someone would be able to point me to some, I'd appreciate it, if not, answers are welcome here too ;)

 

thx

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  • 1 month later...

How was there not more interest in this post? I can't believe I missed it. In my first year trackriding, I never found anything really definitive about this. I'm sure there is, but I've pieced things together to where I am at.

The standard "proper" body alignment is taking a straight line from the coccyx (butt bone) to the mid-neck, keep that even with the lean off the bike, and moving your shoulders just a bit farther into the corner and keep it on the tank.

The weight should be evenly distributed onto the pegs. I've tried putting more pressure on the inside peg, and it becomes a battle with the bike to get into the corner properly, and (I know we shouldn't do it, BUT) it makes midcorner adjustments almost impossible because you're already weighted to the inside.

There should be no weight on the outside arm. You should relax it, and let it fall onto the tank, unless you're a pull into the corner rider. That is why Ben "elbows" Spies is considered to have such a unigue riding style. I know when I'm relaxed, because my elbow falls right onto my outside knee.

For the inside foot, I don't know exactly what we're SUPPOSED to do, but I turn mine out a little. There is a guard on my bike that I can put my foot on consistently, but I still don't know exactly where the peg scrape limit is on my bike, so I don't have anything set for it.

Using the calf raise method for the outside puts a significant amount of pressure on the outside tank, not the seat, allowing us to lean over more into the corner, and not put all that weight on the bars.

The same amount of weight will be distributed on the bike to hold up your weight. The question is where to put it best to properly allow the bike to function.

I hope we get more input from the more seasoned riders, because I'm really into proper BP, and try to help riders on the track whenever I can, and the more I can learn, the better I can help others.

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For the body lean, here's what I'm talking about. The gray on the bike is equal to the gray on the rider, and where he would be initially if adequately aligned with the bike if he were in the proper position. The white is where he would be if he kicked his body out just a little more into the turn.

 

 

untitled-2.jpg

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I had saved this one off from the motogp site. The rider's spine is more parallel to the lean axis of the bike and his butt is well off to the inside, more than just even with the left edge of the seat. The camera angle makes the lean angle look a bit exaggerated. What I find interesting is the footpeg isn't that close to scraping the ground but his knee is down; I have the opposite problem! Also, looking at the angle of the left foot, it doesn't seem he could have much weight on the left footpeg.

1031350_176.jpg

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If you watch the DVD Faster they mention that they like to press down the the pegs to give extra weight/traction to the rear in the turn. But again they dont mention if one peg is pressed down on harder than the other or if they are both pressed down on equal. Pressing down more on the outer peg you would think would want to stand the bike up. Also in some pictures it looks like some guys take their leg that is dragging knee completely off the peg?? Anyone else notice that?

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While you hang off the bike, how is your body weight distributed?

 

Mostly on my butt. My inside foot has a lot of weight on it as well.

 

Do you put much weight on the arm resting on the fuel tank?

 

None.

 

 

do you feel much weight on the inner peg (i.e. can you take it off the peg relatively easy and still keep the BP)?

 

Yes most of my weight is on my inside foot and butt.

 

do you try to put most of the weight on the outer leg? maybe the thigh on the seat?

 

No. I don't really put any "weight" on the outer leg. I do however use the outer leg to hang on to the side of the tank. I put a lot of presure against the side of the tank with the outer leg to hold me on when leaned over, but not much downward "weight".

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I thought that any weight that was put up and into the tank with the outer leg was countered by the outer foot on the peg. I don't think you can have one without the other.

 

My thigh cramped up yesterday halfway around the track, and I had to go through a carousel with my cramping leg on the inside. I had lots of trouble because I couldn't bend my leg or put pressure on it (try to figure that one out). I really slowed down, and was laughing and wincing at the same time because it was so painful but funny. The photographer was in the corner taking shots, and I can only imagine what that looked like. I almost ran off the track, but it would have been no big deal because I was doing about 20 mph in a 50-60 mph turn.

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I thought that any weight that was put up and into the tank with the outer leg was countered by the outer foot on the peg. I don't think you can have one without the other.

I've heard of weighing the outer peg, but it seems scary to me. I've found that focusing on weighing the inner peg relaxes my upper body position, taking the weight off the bars and stabilizes the machine (or the rider- not sure which needs it more). I can then focus attention on apex, exit and getting into the gas.

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I thought that any weight that was put up and into the tank with the outer leg was countered by the outer foot on the peg. I don't think you can have one without the other.

I've heard of weighing the outer peg, but it seems scary to me. I've found that focusing on weighing the inner peg relaxes my upper body position, taking the weight off the bars and stabilizes the machine (or the rider- not sure which needs it more). I can then focus attention on apex, exit and getting into the gas.

 

I'm with hub on this one, the pressure I put on the outer peg helps to wedge my knee into the tank, also see chapter 19 in twist 2!

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I try to differentiate between putting weight on something and putting pressure on something.

 

When you put pressure on the outside peg to force your leg into the side of the tank your not putting weight on the peg. You are pushing against the side of the tank.

 

My messed up reasoning but it helps me sort things out. Kinda like if I stood on the floor and pushed against a wall, I'm not putting weight on the wall, just pressure. If that makes any sense at all :)

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I've never even thought about putting most of my weight on the inside peg and all that weight on the outside. It sounds really hard to control the bike, but I guess it does work. I wasted an entire trackday trying to get the hang of putting all my weight on the inside peg. I was fighting the bike. If I work on things people tell me are effective, I can make it work, or at least implement them into my riding somehow. The only thing I got from putting that force on the inside foot was sore. I completely scrapped even trying it. I'd assume that is a preference thing if there is one in motorcycle riding.

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I've never even thought about putting most of my weight on the inside peg and all that weight on the outside. It sounds really hard to control the bike, but I guess it does work. I wasted an entire trackday trying to get the hang of putting all my weight on the inside peg. I was fighting the bike. If I work on things people tell me are effective, I can make it work, or at least implement them into my riding somehow. The only thing I got from putting that force on the inside foot was sore. I completely scrapped even trying it. I'd assume that is a preference thing if there is one in motorcycle riding.

Chapter 19 in TOTW II talks about pivot steering and putting weight on the outside peg in detail. This sounded counter-intuitive by I tried it my last track day and it started to make sense.

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