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Choosing Your Turn Point


Hotfoot
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Question - when you are riding a new track, how do you choose your turn points, on your first few laps around? Do you have a specific technique, or do you just wing it and see how it turns out? Do you try to spot the apex first, and if you can't see the whole turn, how do you choose it? Do you always go out wide, so you can see farther into the turn? My question applies to unfamiliar roads, too, but for the sake of discussion let's assume that the goal is speed and traction is good, and not consider other factors that would come up in street riding. Do you have a specific set of ideas about how to approach certain types of turns on your FIRST time through?

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Question - when you are riding a new track, how do you choose your turn points, on your first few laps around? Do you have a specific technique, or do you just wing it and see how it turns out? Do you try to spot the apex first, and if you can't see the whole turn, how do you choose it? Do you always go out wide, so you can see farther into the turn? My question applies to unfamiliar roads, too, but for the sake of discussion let's assume that the goal is speed and traction is good, and not consider other factors that would come up in street riding. Do you have a specific set of ideas about how to approach certain types of turns on your FIRST time through?

Hotfoot;

I usually follow someone out and take it easy for the first session or two until I can find enough reference points to feel comfortable; only then do I consider increasing my pace or adjusting any brake markers. The "no brakes" approach in the first session is also an excellent way to aclimatize if circumstances warrant [if your running in an advanced group with people who use tire warmers, this might not be practical. DAMHIK].

 

Kevin

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Whenever I ride a new track, I study the tracks layout on google maps, check out on board footage on youtube and if available watch videos of races on the track to see where they, the racers are turning. Some turns you dont need to go to the outside of the track and that is one thing I am not very good at judging for myself! Like Kevin says, I would go no brakes the first few laps to get a feel for the track, and if possible latch on behind someone for a while.

The nature of your question looks like you may want to ride at a good pace on unfamiliar roads, for this I always pick a late turnpoint, something at the side of the road, I do always go wide to see as much of the turn as possible, oncoming traffic can and often do cut across onto your side when turning so wide and late is safer and you can see if there are any hazzards on the road just before you commit to the turn so you can adjust your line if necessary,

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One tool that I use to learn a track is I go and ride at a comfortable pace, say 60/70%, and turn the bike pretty quickly, and then let it go (a little throttle to keep it stable), and see where I end up.

 

Often we see riders turn and adjust, or turn slowly, but for a long time. Can't tell as easily if the first turn point was really right or not.

 

C

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One of the things that I do at about my 2nd or 3rd lap is to try and pick out the geometric points of the track. I try and ignore any surface irregularities, elevation or camber issues and then work from there.

 

Reading your post though, I thought of some previous posts written by BONES that I'd like to link to here as I think they are relevant:

http://forums.superbikeschool.com/index.ph...tart=#entry9541

 

 

http://forums.superbikeschool.com/index.ph...p;st=#entry9264

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