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Been dying to ask this question. I just read Voixtremes post and well saw this pic of him.

 

http://img29.imageshack.us/i/dsc9157large.jpg/

 

why is it that his knee is not touching the ground. Im sure its because he's finished turning(accelerating allready) in this instance and sure he can get his knee down but ive ridden low in corner leaned off the bike, knee stretched out and nothing no contact. I have seen pics of guys who's bikes are at far less lean angle but theyre knees are down on the asphalt.

 

how come?

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Been dying to ask this question. I just read Voixtremes post and well saw this pic of him.

 

http://img29.imageshack.us/i/dsc9157large.jpg/

 

why is it that his knee is not touching the ground. Im sure its because he's finished turning(accelerating allready) in this instance and sure he can get his knee down but ive ridden low in corner leaned off the bike, knee stretched out and nothing no contact. I have seen pics of guys who's bikes are at far less lean angle but theyre knees are down on the asphalt.

 

how come?

I tended to stay more tucked in on that turn because it is quite a fast turn taken at full throttle so that could be the reason for my knee not touching. Not really sure though.

 

I noticed that a lot of the guys i was passing quite easily were dragging their knees much more often than i did. Maybe they were too concerned with dragging their knee and not concerned enough with everything else?

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Been dying to ask this question. I just read Voixtremes post and well saw this pic of him.

 

http://img29.imageshack.us/i/dsc9157large.jpg/

 

why is it that his knee is not touching the ground. Im sure its because he's finished turning(accelerating allready) in this instance and sure he can get his knee down but ive ridden low in corner leaned off the bike, knee stretched out and nothing no contact. I have seen pics of guys who's bikes are at far less lean angle but theyre knees are down on the asphalt.

 

how come?

 

The usual answer is that usually that the riders body position isn't quite right. Most riders that first learn to hang off in an attempt to knee down have a tendency to a) lean off the bike to far or B) they rotate around the tank. When you do the latter, it actually turns your knee downwards and into the bike rather down at the floor. I'd put reasonable money on the former being the cause myself, though without seeing, its hard to really tell.

 

Bullet

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Been dying to ask this question. I just read Voixtremes post and well saw this pic of him.

 

http://img29.imageshack.us/i/dsc9157large.jpg/

 

why is it that his knee is not touching the ground. Im sure its because he's finished turning(accelerating allready) in this instance and sure he can get his knee down but ive ridden low in corner leaned off the bike, knee stretched out and nothing no contact. I have seen pics of guys who's bikes are at far less lean angle but theyre knees are down on the asphalt.

 

how come?

 

The usual answer is that usually that the riders body position isn't quite right. Most riders that first learn to hang off in an attempt to knee down have a tendency to a) lean off the bike to far or B) they rotate around the tank. When you do the latter, it actually turns your knee downwards and into the bike rather down at the floor. I'd put reasonable money on the former being the cause myself, though without seeing, its hard to really tell.

 

Bullet

Honestly it just felt more comfortable for me to hang off 'tighter" to the bike in that turn because of its speed. I am not sure if that is the proper technique or not though, it just felt best for me in that particular turn to keep everything tucked in.

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Been dying to ask this question. I just read Voixtremes post and well saw this pic of him.

 

http://img29.imageshack.us/i/dsc9157large.jpg/

 

why is it that his knee is not touching the ground. Im sure its because he's finished turning(accelerating allready) in this instance and sure he can get his knee down but ive ridden low in corner leaned off the bike, knee stretched out and nothing no contact. I have seen pics of guys who's bikes are at far less lean angle but theyre knees are down on the asphalt.

 

how come?

 

The usual answer is that usually that the riders body position isn't quite right. Most riders that first learn to hang off in an attempt to knee down have a tendency to a) lean off the bike to far or B) they rotate around the tank. When you do the latter, it actually turns your knee downwards and into the bike rather down at the floor. I'd put reasonable money on the former being the cause myself, though without seeing, its hard to really tell.

 

Bullet

Honestly it just felt more comfortable for me to hang off 'tighter" to the bike in that turn because of its speed. I am not sure if that is the proper technique or not though, it just felt best for me in that particular turn to keep everything tucked in.

 

 

do you normally knee down, but didn't here? I'd buy that by the way, not everyone does, or needs to.

 

The more important to knee down is really what it's used for, apart from looking absolutely fab in those pictures on your desktop or Wall to impress all your non biking mates about how cool you are! <_<

 

Bullet

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Lean off too far? How can that not get ones knee down?

 

Id say that I tend to lean off too much (novice way id say). I know i dont turn my body in a la moto x style, cause my head is past my inside mirror and way past my inside hand.

 

You nail it down right there, i need personal advice someone to see what i do or dont do. Cant wait to do a CSS day.

 

The usual answer is that usually that the riders body position isn't quite right. Most riders that first learn to hang off in an attempt to knee down have a tendency to a) lean off the bike to far or B) they rotate around the tank. When you do the latter, it actually turns your knee downwards and into the bike rather down at the floor. I'd put reasonable money on the former being the cause myself, though without seeing, its hard to really tell.

 

Bullet

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Been dying to ask this question. I just read Voixtremes post and well saw this pic of him.

 

http://img29.imageshack.us/i/dsc9157large.jpg/

 

why is it that his knee is not touching the ground. Im sure its because he's finished turning(accelerating allready) in this instance and sure he can get his knee down but ive ridden low in corner leaned off the bike, knee stretched out and nothing no contact. I have seen pics of guys who's bikes are at far less lean angle but theyre knees are down on the asphalt.

 

how come?

 

The usual answer is that usually that the riders body position isn't quite right. Most riders that first learn to hang off in an attempt to knee down have a tendency to a) lean off the bike to far or B) they rotate around the tank. When you do the latter, it actually turns your knee downwards and into the bike rather down at the floor. I'd put reasonable money on the former being the cause myself, though without seeing, its hard to really tell.

 

Bullet

Honestly it just felt more comfortable for me to hang off 'tighter" to the bike in that turn because of its speed. I am not sure if that is the proper technique or not though, it just felt best for me in that particular turn to keep everything tucked in.

 

 

do you normally knee down, but didn't here? I'd buy that by the way, not everyone does, or needs to.

 

The more important to knee down is really what it's used for, apart from looking absolutely fab in those pictures on your desktop or Wall to impress all your non biking mates about how cool you are! <_<

 

Bullet

I had my knee down consistently all throughout the day, just never in that turn. Was actually quite proud of myself, got to where i was using it as a gauge in the turns and would expect it to touch down at the same spot each lap. (it was my 1st track day :) )

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Been dying to ask this question. I just read Voixtremes post and well saw this pic of him.

 

http://img29.imageshack.us/i/dsc9157large.jpg/

 

why is it that his knee is not touching the ground. Im sure its because he's finished turning(accelerating allready) in this instance and sure he can get his knee down but ive ridden low in corner leaned off the bike, knee stretched out and nothing no contact. I have seen pics of guys who's bikes are at far less lean angle but theyre knees are down on the asphalt.

 

how come?

 

The usual answer is that usually that the riders body position isn't quite right. Most riders that first learn to hang off in an attempt to knee down have a tendency to a) lean off the bike to far or B) they rotate around the tank. When you do the latter, it actually turns your knee downwards and into the bike rather down at the floor. I'd put reasonable money on the former being the cause myself, though without seeing, its hard to really tell.

 

Bullet

Honestly it just felt more comfortable for me to hang off 'tighter" to the bike in that turn because of its speed. I am not sure if that is the proper technique or not though, it just felt best for me in that particular turn to keep everything tucked in.

 

 

do you normally knee down, but didn't here? I'd buy that by the way, not everyone does, or needs to.

 

The more important to knee down is really what it's used for, apart from looking absolutely fab in those pictures on your desktop or Wall to impress all your non biking mates about how cool you are! <_<

 

Bullet

I had my knee down consistently all throughout the day, just never in that turn. Was actually quite proud of myself, got to where i was using it as a gauge in the turns and would expect it to touch down at the same spot each lap. (it was my 1st track day :) )

 

 

 

Rightly so, rights of passage that is my friend. Welcome to the knee down hall of fame! It never gets too tired to be honest! :lol:

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Just by looking at the photo I can tell you that one of two things is going on. First let me say that his BP is otherwise great. His spine is angled just a little more than the angle of the bike, and this is something that takes some riders a VERY long time to achieve. Some never do. I love using Mladin for an example here. Top AMA rider who's body is crossed up in every shot. Great job, Vio.

Otherwise, by the angle of the shot I can assume that either his foot is in the wrong position (not tucked in enough), and it will scrape before his knee, in which case he needs to pull his foot in and stick his knee out more, or he just doesn't have to have his knee down there. The angle of the pic makes it hard to tell either way. He could, by looking at the pic, just have to get his butt off the seat a little more.

It's used by riders who are really in sync with their bikes to tell them they've just about reached the limit of their bike. You can see some riders, like Rossi and Lascourz (?) doing it a lot. You'll be able to see some riders in MotoGP are 55 degrees leaned and don't have their knee down. They know how far out to have their knee, and scraping it tells them that they've max'ed out their lean angle (63-65 degrees for Pedrosa).

Most stick it out to gage as they go. They'll let it hang, and when it grabs, it'll give them an idea of how much more clearance they have. Knee down can act as a gage for lean angle, and helps a rider use it as a crutch, so to speak, in certain instances.

Also, as mentioned above, it never gets old. After a long hiatus from the track when I start dragging knee again I can't help but giggle under my helmet. Wait till you have to buy new ones.

 

http://resources.motogp.com/files/images/x...01.original.jpg

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It's used by riders who are really in sync with their bikes to tell them they've just about reached the limit of their bike. You can see some riders, like Rossi and Lascourz (?) doing it a lot. You'll be able to see some riders in MotoGP are 55 degrees leaned and don't have their knee down. They know how far out to have their knee, and scraping it tells them that they've max'ed out their lean angle (63-65 degrees for Pedrosa).

 

Most stick it out to gage as they go. They'll let it hang, and when it grabs, it'll give them an idea of how much more clearance they have. Knee down can act as a gage for lean angle, and helps a rider use it as a crutch, so to speak, in certain instances.

Also, as mentioned above, it never gets old. After a long hiatus from the track when I start dragging knee again I can't help but giggle under my helmet. Wait till you have to buy new ones.

 

http://resources.motogp.com/files/images/x...01.original.jpg

 

I reckon thats about as close to textbook on the definition on the "why".

 

Excellent post there Hubbard.

 

Bullet

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Just by looking at the photo I can tell you that one of two things is going on. First let me say that his BP is otherwise great. His spine is angled just a little more than the angle of the bike, and this is something that takes some riders a VERY long time to achieve. Some never do. I love using Mladin for an example here. Top AMA rider who's body is crossed up in every shot. Great job, Vio.

Otherwise, by the angle of the shot I can assume that either his foot is in the wrong position (not tucked in enough), and it will scrape before his knee, in which case he needs to pull his foot in and stick his knee out more, or he just doesn't have to have his knee down there. The angle of the pic makes it hard to tell either way. He could, by looking at the pic, just have to get his butt off the seat a little more.

It's used by riders who are really in sync with their bikes to tell them they've just about reached the limit of their bike. You can see some riders, like Rossi and Lascourz (?) doing it a lot. You'll be able to see some riders in MotoGP are 55 degrees leaned and don't have their knee down. They know how far out to have their knee, and scraping it tells them that they've max'ed out their lean angle (63-65 degrees for Pedrosa).

Most stick it out to gage as they go. They'll let it hang, and when it grabs, it'll give them an idea of how much more clearance they have. Knee down can act as a gage for lean angle, and helps a rider use it as a crutch, so to speak, in certain instances.

Also, as mentioned above, it never gets old. After a long hiatus from the track when I start dragging knee again I can't help but giggle under my helmet. Wait till you have to buy new ones.

 

http://resources.motogp.com/files/images/x...01.original.jpg

Thanks for the compliments Hubbard, i appreciate it!

 

You nailed it though, i definitely need to pull my foot in more. I noticed that my foot position is decent in most turns, but on turns where i have to switch directions i lazily hang my foot off more than I should, causing it to scrape probably more than it should. I got better at this during the day, but still need to improve :)

 

I tried to be very consistent with my knee. Kept myself from reaching with my knee in an attempt to touch the ground. It worked well for me, as I would consistently touch my knee down in the same spot in many of the turns throughout the day. I am not the most flexible of guys so my knee may not stick out quite as far as some :)

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Im still scratching my head as to how low and fast i must go to get my knee to scrape?

Do you have any pictures of yourself riding that you could post?

 

Honestly, i wasn't trying to touch my knee when it happened. I've never touched my knee on the street, only at my trackday.

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Im still scratching my head as to how low and fast i must go to get my knee to scrape?

Do you have any pictures of yourself riding that you could post?

 

Honestly, i wasn't trying to touch my knee when it happened. I've never touched my knee on the street, only at my trackday.

I know people who race who hardly ever get a knee down and are not affected by that fact at all. Shawna Aron who retired two years ago from WCC and Am600 in Canada has posted on other Forums that she rarely touches a knee.

 

YRMV.

 

Kevin

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Im still scratching my head as to how low and fast i must go to get my knee to scrape?

Do you have any pictures of yourself riding that you could post?

 

Honestly, i wasn't trying to touch my knee when it happened. I've never touched my knee on the street, only at my trackday.

I know people who race who hardly ever get a knee down and are not affected by that fact at all. Shawna Aron who retired two years ago from WCC and Am600 in Canada has posted on other Forums that she rarely touches a knee.

 

YRMV.

 

Kevin

Also, like i said, there were quite a lot people who were riding a slower pace than I was who were dragging their knee constantly, waaay more often than i was. I think they may have been focusing too much on dragging the knee and leaning the bike way over than on what was really important.

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SO getting one's knee down is really to be a guage for one self as to how far you can still go until you push your bike to far over? Something that i should not worry about at all?

 

I know excately how it sounds, it sounds like a little kid stubbornly wanting something and will not rest until its done, but fact is i dont want it to be a MUST do thing, but rather is it neccesary to do? type of thing.

 

I mean i constantly ask myself what is it that drives me to go fast into a turn, go fast on the bike, why do i ride a motorbike in the first place etc...and why do i sometimes feel that i have to win or atleast be a close second if i am racing someone somewhere?

 

Apologies for gettin so philosophical :blink:

 

Thx for info.

 

I know people who race who hardly ever get a knee down and are not affected by that fact at all. Shawna Aron who retired two years ago from WCC and Am600 in Canada has posted on other Forums that she rarely touches a knee.

 

YRMV.

 

Kevin

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Yeah thats what its really used for, though it does look cool. I have to confess I'm not a massive knee dragger, and I can make a set of knee sliders last me years. I lean the bike over, get my gauge, and then pull my knee in mostly. On the road, I'd completely forget about it, in fact, I'd completely forget about till you get your body position sorted, as without good body position, (i.e. riding very twisted), you need a lot of lean angle. I'd think of it as something that either will, or won't happen, it won't make you faster in anyway shape or form and it can be a big distraction.

 

The answer to your why do I go fast question as we all know is because its great fun, it's challenging and it makes you feel very alive. <_<

 

Bullet.

 

 

SO getting one's knee down is really to be a guage for one self as to how far you can still go until you push your bike to far over? Something that i should not worry about at all?

 

I know excately how it sounds, it sounds like a little kid stubbornly wanting something and will not rest until its done, but fact is i dont want it to be a MUST do thing, but rather is it neccesary to do? type of thing.

 

I mean i constantly ask myself what is it that drives me to go fast into a turn, go fast on the bike, why do i ride a motorbike in the first place etc...and why do i sometimes feel that i have to win or atleast be a close second if i am racing someone somewhere?

 

Apologies for gettin so philosophical :blink:

 

Thx for info.

 

I know people who race who hardly ever get a knee down and are not affected by that fact at all. Shawna Aron who retired two years ago from WCC and Am600 in Canada has posted on other Forums that she rarely touches a knee.

 

YRMV.

 

Kevin

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Just now getting to this, you guys have already been over it a bit :).

 

There are quite a few pieces to the body position/knee down on the deck puzzle. Not going to try and even go after all of them, as the Lean Bike, and almost all of Level 3 is about the rider on the bike, and that relationship. And there isn't just one way to skin this cat. We have a certain approach at the school, but has to be modified a litlte with some riders.

 

One piece that could be commented on is, if the rider doesn't hold on with his legs, what will he then hold on to to support him self in the hung off position?

 

CF

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One piece that could be commented on is, if the rider doesn't hold on with his legs, what will he then hold on to to support him self in the hung off position?

 

CF

 

Thought provoking question

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Im still scratching my head as to how low and fast i must go to get my knee to scrape?

I can do most of my trackday without getting my knee down. It's an old pic, but if you look at my avatar, there is absolutely no reason to have my knee down other than I knew the photographer was on that corner. On Main, the last track I did, there were only 4 corners that I actually got my knee down on when I was riding really tucked in.

Firebeast, unless it's the angle, I'd say that you could just stick your knee out and it would drag.

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... but ive ridden low in corner leaned off the bike, knee stretched out and nothing no contact. I have seen pics of guys who's bikes are at far less lean angle but theyre knees are down on the asphalt.

 

how come?

 

G'day Firebeast,

 

I'll give you my thoughts on what may help you get your knee down (but, as others have mentioned above, once you're getting your knee down, you'll probably find that you frequently deliberately tuck it up to keep it off the ground). Also, apologies in advance for the length of this reply.

 

Anyway, the following are all important:

 

1. Your hips have to be ever-so-slightly angled on the seat so that they are facing to the inside of the corner. For example, if you're going around a left-hand corner, your hips should be facing toward the left side of the fuel tank. Frequently, riders who try to hang off the seat will actually end up rotating the wrong way on the seat so that their hips actually end up facing to the right of the fuel tank (in a left-hand corner and vice-versa in a right-hand corner). Now, imagine what effect that has: if your hips are facing to the outside of the bike then you've got to be quite a contortionist to be able to open your inside leg up enough to touch the ground with your knee - you're rotating your hips in the opposite direction to the direction in which your trying to point your knee - that makes it extremely difficult to do!

 

2. The line of your upper body should also point ever-so-slightly to the inside of the bike. Again, if you're going around a left-hand corner, then your upper body (visualize an extension of your spine) should be pointing to the left of the fuel tank. It's very easy to fool yourself here. You can easily imagine that your pointing your upper body to the inside of the bike when, in reality, all you've done is hang your backside off the seat and your body ends up compensating and pointing back toward the centre of the bike. Again, use your fuel tank as a reference - if you're going around a left-hand corner, then the line from your butt to your head should be pointing away to the left of the seat and fuel tank. You'll find it much easier to point your upper body to the inside of the bike if you lie down on the fuel tank. That'll also make it easier to rotate your hips to the inside as well (as mentioned above).

 

3. Use counter-steering to lean the bike down. This makes a huge difference. If you try to muscle the bike down (instead of counter-steering), you'll end up tensing up in the legs. Once you tense up in the legs, they'll have a tendency to clamp together - ie, that's the opposite of what you want your inside leg to do.

 

4. Absolutely DON'T GRIP onto the handlebars. Get yourself balanced on the bike so that you aren't hanging on to the handlebars. All you should be doing on the handlebars is applying gentle forward pressure to the inside handgrip (to bring the bike down low) and gently twisting the throttle open so that you are slightly accelerating (and, thereby, transferring weight to the rear wheel so that the load distribution on the front and rear wheels is balanced - ie, slightly more weight on the rear than the front as the rear is much fatter). If you hang onto the handlebars you may cause the bike to crash but you will also tense up in the body, which is the opposite to what you want to do if you want to be able to open your inside leg enough for it to touch the ground.

 

5. You have to 'slump' off the inside of the bike. That doesn't necessarily mean that you have to hang a long way off. In fact, hanging off a long way may make it more difficult because it may cause you to rotate your hips and body in the wrong direction (see 1 and 2 above). What I mean by 'slump' is that you need to be absolutely relaxed (like a rag doll). Just lock your upper leg against the bike by pushing down against the footpeg with your upper foot (ie, the foot attached to the leg on the outside of the bike) while pressing your knee and thigh agains the fuel tank. The rest of your body, however, needs to be absolutely limp so that it sags down on the inside of the bike. If you hang off but keep the muscles in your body tense, you'll actually end up sitting high in the seat, which takes you further from the ground - ie, the opposite of what you want to do if you want to get your knee down.

 

So, in short, rotate your hips and body to the inside of the corner, be ABSOLUTELY RELAXED all through your body, NO WEIGHT WHATSOEVER on the handlebars, use gentle forward pressure on the inside handgrip to bring the bike down low and apply gentle acceleration to keep the weight correctly distributed between front and rear wheels.

 

I'd certainly highly recommend reading Keith Code's Twist of the Wrist I and II (two books) in which he explains a lot more than I did above and doing the California Superbike Schools (I've done Levels One, Two and Three).

 

With all the information that you get, don't lose sight of the fact that it's all part of a 'system' - ie, you can't just pick one or two 'magic' riding techniques and expect it to work. It's all got to work together.

 

Best of luck.

 

Taras

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... but ive ridden low in corner leaned off the bike, knee stretched out and nothing no contact. I have seen pics of guys who's bikes are at far less lean angle but theyre knees are down on the asphalt.

 

how come?

 

Hey Firebeast,

 

Since posting my reply (above), I've just noticed the photo that you use as your avatar (I'm presuming that it's a photo of you) and I can tell you exactly why your knee isn't on the ground. It's very much about the angle of rotation of your hips and upper body, as I explained in my earlier reply.

 

Have a look at your photo. You are going around a left-hand corner. However, if you imagine a rod going through your left hip and extending out your right hip, you will see that your hips are facing a long way toward the right. Your knee is quite close to the ground in the photo. Now, looking at the photo again, imagine if you rotated the 'rod' so that your hips are facing to the inside of the corner. Looking at the photo, just visualize how far that would rotate your leg toward the ground. Wow, you'd have your knee hard down on the ground man!

 

Now, also notice in the photo that your upper body is also pointing to the right. Look at the photo and visualize a line running from the top of the crack in your butt up your spine and out through the helmet. Can you see that it's actually pointing back over the top of the fuel tank and out to the right of the bike, when what you really want is for your upper body to be pointing out to the left. Again, looking at the photo, just visualize how far toward the ground it would bring your knee if you rotated your upper body so that it points toward the left of the bike!

 

Ok, what to do about correcting the problem. To begin with, don't hang your butt off the seat so much. In the photo, it looks like you've got both cheeks off the seat. Hanging your butt off the seat so much can easily fool you into thinking that you're getting closer to ground when it's actually having the opposite effect because it causes your hips and body to rotate AWAY from the ground - ie, the opposite of what you want to achieve.

 

Next, try to lie forward more. That will make it easier to point your upper body to the left (in a left-hand corner; vice-versa in a right-hand corner).

 

I can't see the geometry of your footpegs but, if you can, try to bring your knee further forward on your upper leg - ie, in this photo, that's your right leg. In other words, don't try to grip with just your knee. Instead, move your knee forward so that the knee and part of the inside of the thigh are against the tank. By moving your upper knee forward (if that's possible with the footpeg geometry), that will help to rotate your hips to the inside of the corner.

 

Your arms seem fairly relaxed so it doesn't look like you're gripping too tight but just keep an eye on that next time. As I mentioned in my previous reply, you have to be extremely gentle on the handlebars. Use a little gentle forward pressure on the inside grip to bring the bike down low.

 

Hope that all helps.

 

Cheers,

 

Taras

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Hey thx for the detailed answers. I really appreciated it.

 

Well to be honest that is not me on my Avatar but rather the Legend Freddie Spencer. I am glad actually that you commented on it. I was meaning many a time to ask opinions about his body positioning in that pic. ;)

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Hey Taras if that is you in your Avatar then without out a shadow of a doubt that is my body position to the Tee. Except i really dont get down that low i think. Ive allways ridden with my body hanging off the side of the bike, allmost Jamie Witham and Ben Spies style but that is just probably in my mind.

 

The following is how i take a corner, after reading Twist 2 and watching instructional vidz on Youtube.

 

Let say left hand corner:

1. Ass cheek off and my butt crack is aligned with the edge of the seat closes to the ground.

2. Allmost standing on both my feet, this helps with switching from left to right easier and keeps the weight of the bike in the centre, not front or back.

3. WHen i switch over from left to right or coming out of the turn i use my knee that is touching hte tank to pull myself back into the seat. the bike then does not wiggle about.

4. my hands are super light on the bars, many a time have they moved about while im on the power and i let tehm do what they need to do.

5. i push my knee out but dont force it, ive pushed it out so much one day that my muscles on the inside hurt. THat just did not seem right.

 

If you look at hte picture to the left of the California superbike school logo on the top of the page then i dont even put my head on the tank like that guy is doing. My head will be allmost next to the handlebars. I sometimes adjust my upper body slightly to get it into that position closer to the road.

 

So i just out of waht i explained cannot understand that i have not been able to touch the road with my knee.

 

As Cobie asked earlier when leaning off the bike i kinda stand on the pegs and my hands i can take of the bars and i will not fall over or forward. This i know for a fact cause after every great turn i think about how i entered it and how i exited it. Was i following what Keith Code said or did i do my own thing.

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Hey Taras if that is you in your Avatar then without out a shadow of a doubt that is my body position to the Tee. Except i really dont get down that low i think. Ive allways ridden with my body hanging off the side of the bike, allmost Jamie Witham and Ben Spies style but that is just probably in my mind.

 

The following is how i take a corner, after reading Twist 2 and watching instructional vidz on Youtube.

 

Let say left hand corner:

1. Ass cheek off and my butt crack is aligned with the edge of the seat closes to the ground.

2. Allmost standing on both my feet, this helps with switching from left to right easier and keeps the weight of the bike in the centre, not front or back.

3. WHen i switch over from left to right or coming out of the turn i use my knee that is touching hte tank to pull myself back into the seat. the bike then does not wiggle about.

4. my hands are super light on the bars, many a time have they moved about while im on the power and i let tehm do what they need to do.

5. i push my knee out but dont force it, ive pushed it out so much one day that my muscles on the inside hurt. THat just did not seem right.

 

If you look at hte picture to the left of the California superbike school logo on the top of the page then i dont even put my head on the tank like that guy is doing. My head will be allmost next to the handlebars. I sometimes adjust my upper body slightly to get it into that position closer to the road.

 

So i just out of waht i explained cannot understand that i have not been able to touch the road with my knee.

 

As Cobie asked earlier when leaning off the bike i kinda stand on the pegs and my hands i can take of the bars and i will not fall over or forward. This i know for a fact cause after every great turn i think about how i entered it and how i exited it. Was i following what Keith Code said or did i do my own thing.

Is this on the street or at the track?

 

I personally have never touched my knee down on the street. I think a lot of that has to do with the fact that on the street you are confined to a narrower segment of road than you are on the track (where you can use a lot more space) and you probably aren't going 'all out' like you might at the track. However, at the track i did not ride all that differently than i do on the street and was able to touch my knee with relative ease and without really trying.

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