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Windy Conditions


ozfireblade
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Hey guys,

 

I feel a bit stupid asking this question, I've just finished reading TOTW & TOTW2, one straight after the other. It has cleared up my original post on countersteering and a few others to boot so I'm putting this to practice @ phillip island on monday.

 

I read the part on pivot steering and that was an eye opener. I had thought that you would pressure the inside peg when turningputting more pressure on the rear, makes sense now that I read it . However I was coming back from the great ocean road and it was extremely windy pushing me all over the place and I found that countersteering and pressuring the inside peg in the direction of the wind would keep me straight, when I used the outside peg the bike stood upright and the wind would push me across 3 lanes? Now I'm not sure if this is the same thing as none of the book covers windy conditons as a 'product or sub product'. How do we approach windy conditions with gust etc go faster?

 

Cheers

 

Dylan (ozfireblade)

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Hey guys,

 

I feel a bit stupid asking this question, I've just finished reading TOTW & TOTW2, one straight after the other. It has cleared up my original post on countersteering and a few others to boot so I'm putting this to practice @ phillip island on monday.

 

I read the part on pivot steering and that was an eye opener. I had thought that you would pressure the inside peg when turningputting more pressure on the rear, makes sense now that I read it . However I was coming back from the great ocean road and it was extremely windy pushing me all over the place and I found that countersteering and pressuring the inside peg in the direction of the wind would keep me straight, when I used the outside peg the bike stood upright and the wind would push me across 3 lanes? Now I'm not sure if this is the same thing as none of the book covers windy conditons as a 'product or sub product'. How do we approach windy conditions with gust etc go faster?

 

Cheers

 

Dylan (ozfireblade)

 

Hi Dylan,

 

Well it sounds good that we've been able tO clean up countersteering for you, but sounds like we've moved onto another misunderstanding there if I may so bold. May I ask how long you took over reading the books? Sittings? Hours? As TOTW 1 and 2 take some chewing, and probably more importantly, a lot of time to digest, and I fear you may have tried to consume way too much, too quickly. I've read TOTW in addition of a dozen or more times, and I have to keep referring to it, in coaching studies for finer details, and I still can't quote you verbatim on it. I thought I'd also point out, Pivot steering is a level 3 drill, and wonder whether you've got this a little mixed up with the pick up drill here?

 

So, we'll have a set of questions, see if you're clear now, on what we do, and why? So, how do we steer a bike now, say if we want to go left, hows that work? When you want to pivot steering, how do we do execute that?, and why do we do that over normal countersteering? Do you know what Pick Up drill is?

 

Let us know your thoughts mate, and we'll see what we can do to clear this up for you.

 

Bullet

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Morning Oz,

 

I just wanted to let you know that I probably won't be around on the forum until next weeked now, as we're off to Spain & Portugal today for some 2 day camps. Additionally, I know Cobie and the US crew are out for a lot of the week too, so your unlikely to get a response from any of the coaches this week.

 

If someone of our normal contributors and friends wishes to assist Oz, that would really helpful. With some luck, you've an idea where I'm trying to get him too on this thread.

 

Thanks guys,

 

Seeya in a week.

 

Bullet

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thanks bullet, After re-reading what I wrote I've even confused myself, I'm @ the track today so I will hopefully catch up with adam, hi adam, and hit him up for some help....I'm hitting the books so I don't sound stupid again...hopefully ill get a decent pic for bp comments

Thanks again for your help...hope your shoulder healing well

Dylan

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As far as windage the lower you are the less the wind will effect you. Once street riding I was doing a 100mile trip w/ my girlfriend and I on a cbr 600rr 05 and there was a massive cross wind of around 40mph constantly. We had to stay as low as possible, because we were violently being blown around. Keep low and the wind will have less of an effect. Hold on to the tank with your knees for grip and even bring your elbows into the tank for more securety. Obviously in a straight line...

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I've done a lot of cross-country motorcycle traveling so dealt with my fair share of crosswinds. Seems to me that the important thing is to countersteer as necessary to counteract the wind, so you can stay in your lane, as you already seem to understand.

 

In order to push on the handlebar with good force (countersteer) you have to brace yourself against some other parts of the bike, like the seat, tank, and pegs, and that's what the pushing on the pegs is all about. For me what works is I clamp onto the bike with my legs and turn the freak'n handlebar because that is what makes the difference, I don't get distracted with all this peg pushing.

 

And like kawadude said stay low so the wind has less leverage against you.

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Like they said above: if you're talking about in a straight line, all you do is tuck. I was riding behind a friend down some back roads when I first got my bike, and we were cruising around 140 mph for over 15 minutes. It gave me time to look around. Brian was in front of me, and I noticed that he was really leaning. I was new to sportbikes, and seeing him like that was scary. Of course I still had some time to think, and it hit me that if HE'S leaning like that, I must be leaning like that as well.

 

When I was cruising from Las Vegas to Primm, a town on the southern boarder of Nevada and California, the wind was howling. I was getting beat all over the place, and I tried tucking under my shield, and it helped, but with the way the wind was blowing I was still getting beat around up to a couple feet to the right with any strong gust. I sped up. I know how stupid this all sounds, and it is, but I learned that slowing down made it worse. Speeding up made it so much better. I wasn't feeling anything.

 

Since running at 140 the first time, I couldn't tell, but the speed that made everything feel better was 130 mph. Anything over that kept me from feeling the gusts. Anything under, and I was natures punching bag.

 

I was riding from Vegas to Phoenix, and once I got across the Hoover Damn and out of the mountains, I was being victimized. I cruised all the way to Kingman at 130 mph and only felt the wind when I would slow down when I was going through the cities.

 

If you have a long straight, a strong with, and a good friend, just get in behind him, tuck under the shield and watch. The lean angle he's at is the lean angle you'll be at.

 

Pivot steering isn't going to have anything to do with the conversation of straightline speed and wind. It's a cornering technique. I didn't know what pivot steering was when I was told to put my pressure on the inside peg while cornering. I wasted a day trying this because I didn't know it was preference. We've had this discussion on this board, and there are riders on here who prefer weighting the inside peg, but I'm so locked in on my bike with my outside leg that I could take my inside leg off the peg if I wanted to. You're trying to weigh the inside peg and turn the bike that way as well. I was fighting myself. That, and picking the bike up while I'm pushing on the inside peg just doesn't work well for me.

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Catching up on this, reviewed the last posts, but one question: does anyone think that pivot steering is pushing on the inside peg?

 

There is a chapter on Twist 2 on this, Page 84/85, that will help clear this up.

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Catching up on this, reviewed the last posts, but one question: does anyone think that pivot steering is pushing on the inside peg?

 

There is a chapter on Twist 2 on this, Page 84/85, that will help clear this up.

 

No need for the book on this one. I've read this a few times, as I've fallen in love with this technique. Weight is on the outside. I feel like I have more control over the bike, and it gives me a feeling of comfort. I'm still building on it, but it's such a good feeling.

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