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Hello!

 

I'm purely a street rider and my Nirvana is a totally unfamiliar road littered with hairpins. Many moons ago I tried riding on a track, but was bored stiff after 8 laps. However, having ridden for 30 years more or less clueless, it's probably about time I took a class (or several) and perhaps understand a little about what's going on when steering a motorcycle. And if a few days at the track is required, I think I can endure it for the learning experience. Until then, I'll probably pester you on this forum with some questions ;)

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Hello!

 

I'm purely a street rider and my Nirvana is a totally unfamiliar road littered with hairpins. Many moons ago I tried riding on a track, but was bored stiff after 8 laps. However, having ridden for 30 years more or less clueless, it's probably about time I took a class (or several) and perhaps understand a little about what's going on when steering a motorcycle. And if a few days at the track is required, I think I can endure it for the learning experience. Until then, I'll probably pester you on this forum with some questions ;)

Welcome to the forum! Most guys here, like myself, like track and road riding, you can certainly learn a lot on the track that will enhance your time on the road. Each place has its advantages. The school might be helpul to overcome the boring part of the track because learning and having those "aha...." moments (not the "aaaaaahhh...." moments!) is rewarding.

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Welcome!!! By bored on track I'm guessing you mean that there was no oncoming traffic and other unknowns just around the corner as well as no any other 'surprises' like on the street!! You could try racing that might not be boring :) But like Jody and Stevo say its the best place to learn and practice, as well as having the "oh thats whats that feels like' and screaming in your helmet as you finally nail that corner just right. Me personally I LOVE the track, no oncoming, run off areas, other bikers, one way traffic, medical staff on standby, experts on track to ask questions of...I could go on...hope you end up enjoying the track as much as I do

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Thank you for the replies :)

 

What I do not like about the track is that it's repetitions. After about 5 laps, the tyres began sliding everywhere (old style Avons on a little Honda Hawk from the '80s) and I felt like I had exhausted everything I could after another couple of laps. Not that I couldn't learn more; it just wasn't fun. I've also tried go-kart driving a couple of times. From lap 3 on I only manage to improve one second or less per lap, whereas my friends have improved as much as 15 seconds, and after 30 minutes they would equal my pace. Had we continued, they would have beaten me. Slow - or useless - learner, me :unsure:

 

Surprisingly, my 22 year old son spent several hours riding at the same track I rode that old Honda not that long ago, and loved every second of it and wants more - proof positive that the apple falls far from the trunk sometimes :P

 

I have had several crashes on the road, some nearly ending me. More than 45 broken bones and various internal injuries. Last one was a couple of years back when a Volvo driver decided to overtake around a blind corner on a narrow, winding mountain road. The road was barely wide enough to let two cars past with no room for me. I must have locked the front wheel when I came around and found the road blocked, but have no recollection of it. I hit the Volvo bumper head on, nose first. My AGV Rossi Replica helmet cracked in the impact, but I survived with a broken nose, a heavy concussion and sore neck.

 

Still too daft to worry about it when I go riding, however (I rode my other bike to work 36 hours later, nose still sitting at a weird angle.) My ignorance is also why I prefer older bikes without much power, since they naturally slow me down.

 

But I'd like to follow a few classes in order to not panick and overreact if I ever face another oncoming car or get into a corner too hot. Perfecting certain techniques and really understand what's going on instead of simply relying on instincts should enhance my safety under stress significantly.

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HI Eirik,

 

You have already been welcomed, I'll just add +1.

 

There are some techniques that apply to both road and track (most of what we train), I think if you could make it up to Level 2, that would be ideal. I agree with the other lads on the track being a great laboratory, with no Volvos either! Track riding for me allows the limit to be pushed much higher and harder, than I'm willing to ride on the street. A couple of close calls (cars in my lane) and I decided to leave a little more of a margin.

 

You'll have to keep us posted and let us know if you do, and what changes you notice.

 

Best,

Cobie

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