Jump to content

Figured Out Why I've Become Inconsistent.


Recommended Posts

Yesterday, at the track, I figured out my problem (inconsistent times) since CSS levels one and two. At our East track I used to run 1:08, having done 1:07 once. Strictly. MAYBE the occasional 1:10, but I was otherwise like clockwork. I was stuck, and knew I needed help. And the school did just that. Helped me. I have things to learn now that I KNOW are going to make me faster, and have really improved and become even more comfortable. But my times are wildly inconsistent. I do 1:08-1:11 now, and have the faster lap here and there, and have even done a 1:03. Once. It's a small track, so no one, not even someone at my level, should have a 3-4 second difference in times.

 

I couldn't figure out what was going on, and then it hit me. It was something I remembered from school when I was flagged by a corner worker. It was my two input turning technique that I had perfected. I used engine braking (takes control from you in setting corner speed) and, naturally, after being in too slow after the first input, I gas it to get myself around the corner as I lean it in more.

 

That's bad, and here's why. When I'm leaned in I should be getting on the throttle and maintaining lean. Leaning in farther decreases available traction, and getting on the throttle before or while I'm increasing my lean (making my second input) increases wheel spin WHILE I'm reducing traction. That's not just asking for trouble. It's actually telling the bike that I WANT trouble. I've lowsided once, and just chalked it up to too much throttle. I'll bet a lot of money that this is what caused it. I've gotten off the throttle since the lowside, as I thought I had reached and surpassed my tires capacity.

 

The thing is that with my new-found ability to quickturn I've also become inconsistent in my lean angle through every corner. And I don't make adjustments, I just follow the one input policy to turning. My angle has decreased, as my feeler (knee) doesn't make it to the ground near as much as it used to. I'm there-fore slower altogether.

 

Is it just practice and increased confidence that will get me to do 1:03's consistently, or is there something to my technique? It's only my second trackday since the school in October because I've been sick, but I'm going to hopefully get a couple in before the summer heat strikes.

 

 

And in a couple of weeks I'm doing Inde Motorsports Ranch. Brand new track in Wilcox, Az.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yesterday, at the track, I figured out my problem (inconsistent times) since CSS levels one and two. At our East track I used to run 1:08, having done 1:07 once. Strictly. MAYBE the occasional 1:10, but I was otherwise like clockwork. I was stuck, and knew I needed help. And the school did just that. Helped me. I have things to learn now that I KNOW are going to make me faster, and have really improved and become even more comfortable. But my times are wildly inconsistent. I do 1:08-1:11 now, and have the faster lap here and there, and have even done a 1:03. Once. It's a small track, so no one, not even someone at my level, should have a 3-4 second difference in times.

 

I couldn't figure out what was going on, and then it hit me. It was something I remembered from school when I was flagged by a corner worker. It was my two input turning technique that I had perfected. I used engine braking (takes control from you in setting corner speed) and, naturally, after being in too slow after the first input, I gas it to get myself around the corner as I lean it in more.

 

That's bad, and here's why. When I'm leaned in I should be getting on the throttle and maintaining lean. Leaning in farther decreases available traction, and getting on the throttle before or while I'm increasing my lean (making my second input) increases wheel spin WHILE I'm reducing traction. That's not just asking for trouble. It's actually telling the bike that I WANT trouble. I've lowsided once, and just chalked it up to too much throttle. I'll bet a lot of money that this is what caused it. I've gotten off the throttle since the lowside, as I thought I had reached and surpassed my tires capacity.

 

The thing is that with my new-found ability to quickturn I've also become inconsistent in my lean angle through every corner. And I don't make adjustments, I just follow the one input policy to turning. My angle has decreased, as my feeler (knee) doesn't make it to the ground near as much as it used to. I'm there-fore slower altogether.

 

Is it just practice and increased confidence that will get me to do 1:03's consistently, or is there something to my technique? It's only my second trackday since the school in October because I've been sick, but I'm going to hopefully get a couple in before the summer heat strikes.

 

 

And in a couple of weeks I'm doing Inde Motorsports Ranch. Brand new track in Wilcox, Az.

 

 

Its good that you were able to analyze your riding.

 

IMO your corner speed is not only a factor of your turn in rate but how much you brake also. just practice and slowly up the pace. on a 600, its really important that you get the whole corner correct so that you are at the peak of your powerband as you are exiting to maintain good speed. if you screw up the entry, you tend to charge the apex and then you end up wide or you just dont have enough rpm to get your bike to shoot out. Also, relying on engine braking to set your entry speed is wasting time-it should be either on the brakes or throttle.

 

lastly, it doesnt hurt to ask a local for tips. have someone take you out for a few laps and you will be amazed how much faster you can be with the right person leading you.

 

good luck!

 

ps..i envy you guys.. riding season doesnt start until next month for us in the central region.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Based on your description Jason, I would suggest you take a session (or two) and work on the Two Step drill we went over in level one. It sounds like you need to make sure that your initial steering input is correct and that you are confident you can get the bike on the line you want in one steering input. Using the Two Step technique correctly should help with this.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Based on your description Jason, I would suggest you take a session (or two) and work on the Two Step drill we went over in level one. It sounds like you need to make sure that your initial steering input is correct and that you are confident you can get the bike on the line you want in one steering input. Using the Two Step technique correctly should help with this.

 

Thanks for the help guys.

 

Stu, I don't know if it's just that I'm on my bike, but I'm not getting over like I was. I'm still getting over fast, but not as far as when I attended the school. I work on the two step all the time on the street, and thought I was really comfortable with it, but I'll re-evaluate on the 20th. I'm doing Inde Motorsports Ranch in Wilcox, Az. 2.75 mile, 21 turn track. They have a couple of pavement runoffs that I'm thinking about working on confidence in. I'll just throw it over and see what happens. Go a little faster every session. Can I borrow anyones bike?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It was my two input turning technique that I had perfected. I used engine braking (takes control from you in setting corner speed) and, naturally, after being in too slow after the first input, I gas it to get myself around the corner as I lean it in more.

 

don't know if it's just that I'm on my bike, but I'm not getting over like I was.

 

 

Sounds like classic charging corner syndrome. Try the No Brakes drill and gradually build up the corner speed and the required quick turn.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm not getting over like I was. I'm still getting over fast, but not as far as when I attended the school.

 

 

One thing to consider is that if your turning the bike quicker, it will require LESS lean angle to get through the same corner at the same speed.

 

So the simple solution is just go faster :) lol :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

One thing to consider is that if your turning the bike quicker, it will require LESS lean angle to get through the same corner at the same speed.

 

So the simple solution is just go faster :) lol :)

 

You're joking, but that's what I'm thinking. I'll have to slowly get more comfortable getting the bike over quicker and farther. I opened it up once on the track in Vegas, did a 1:03 (still got passed by another rider like I was standing still), and I felt comfortable, but it's the only time I really punched it in that controlled environment.

 

There are just so few corners with that over-run that I'd feel comfortable doing it on. The turn in Vegas by the gate (counter-clockwise) was brilliant because there was that over-run. I remember following you and seeing how fast we were going through it. I was doing that corner at about my normal pace because I had to catch back up to you after the huge roundabout.

 

If I can get back to that at my normal pace, I can start blaming any shortcomings on the bike.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Has anyone been to the that track in AZ, Motorsports Ranch?

I'll tell you how it was March 22nd. I'm going to spend a couple of days down there that weekend. I had some friends and Peris go down there a couple weekends ago, and they did nothing but praise it. I can't wait to go. There are only two places, if you're going fast enough, that the bike will be straight up and down.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...