Jump to content

Jerez On-Board - Throttle Application


khp
 Share

Recommended Posts

I noticed in the just-released on-board videos from Jerez (most likely a practice session) that there is quite some difference between the three bikes. The captions don't say who the riders are, so I'll just call them by the bikes.

 

If you listen carefully to the rpms (I had to turn up volume a lot to hear it), the Ducati has falling RPMs almost all the way through the turns until the bike is stood up and gunned.

 

The Honda driver seems to take a more 'classic' CSS approach with the throttle being added sooner in the turn (I wouldn't call it "immediately after the steering action has completed", though).

 

The Yamaha rider seems to run with a neutral throttle through mid-corner, but less pronounced than the Ducati.

 

(Seems I cannot post three videos at the same time)

 

Anyone willing to go out on a limb explaining this?

 

Kai

 

Edit: fixed link to Honda video. Sorry 'bout that, Dave.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The sound definitely did not match up on the Ducati video. Even from the start the sound was slightly behind the video and it just got worse as the video went on.

 

The Honda link was a video of the Yamaha. I am kind of surprised by the throttle usage in the yamaha video. They had some maintenance throttle than simply stood the bike up and grabbed a hand full of throttle by the sound and look of it. I figured it would have been a smoother throttle roll on and standing the bike up.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think it's simply a case of not everyone riding the CSS way, having watched Simon Crafar's video, he doesn't and I'm willing to bet that a lot of others don't either. It's not to say that they're necessarily right to do it like that, but I'm not about to lecture the likes of Lorenzo or Rossi and tell them they're doing it 'wrong'.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think it's simply a case of not everyone riding the CSS way, having watched Simon Crafar's video, he doesn't and I'm willing to bet that a lot of others don't either. It's not to say that they're necessarily right to do it like that, but I'm not about to lecture the likes of Lorenzo or Rossi and tell them they're doing it 'wrong'.

I absolutely agree, Steve. I was thinking the opposite way around: what can we learn from the way that Lorenzo, Hayden, Pedrosa, Stoner, and Rossi rides. Maybe there's something we (or, gasp, even Keith!) missed when working out the technology of riding.

 

As an example, CSS clearly recommends that you don't hang out too much: "one cheek is enough" is said in the TOWT2-DVD. But when I watched the MotoGP Qualifying Practice on Saturday (I happened to find a bar in GuangZhou that showed ESPN. Didn't get to see the race due to a 5 hour delayed flight), clearly Stoner is hanging out with BOTH cheeks, and he's actually crawling down on the side of the bike.

 

So how do we go and resolve these two observations into a single common "theory" or "technology"? I have my opinions about this...

 

Kai

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wow, the sound on those videos are not the best... seems to me that they have reduced the microphone gain, so we can only hear the louder sounds, the lower volume sounds of actual throttle opening could be cut out completely... (or maybe it's just a bad mic) You're right it does seem very strange, if you go by what you hear in those videos it seems like they're getting on the throttle really late. But given how fast they're going, do you think it's possible? The visual doesn't seem to match the sound...

 

Have a look at this onboard video showing Casey Stoner at the Sepang test earlier in the year:

 

 

That seems like a better quality video, throttle sounds just like what I'd expect?

 

I always find onboard videos really tricky to look at, as far as trying to figure out what the rider/bike is doing. Much more obvious to see in person. Also they could be (or should I say, probably are) using different lines which can account for the different timing.

 

It's also interesting that you mention the different styles in hanging off. But I think you hit it right on the head when you mentioned that the recommendation is for one cheek off the seat. Clearly that's not the only possible way to ride, and no one has ever said that. I always think of Elias and his body position... looks crazy uncomfortable and stressful to me, but then I am not a World Champion. Also those guys in MotoGP like Stoner, Pedrosa - they are really small guys. And they sometimes look as if they're climbing all over their bikes like monkeys. So I think the recommendation for one cheek off still holds true, and will most definitely be beneficial for the majority of riders, who do not posses World Champion skill and tiny physical stature.

 

I don't think there is really any need to resolve all riding styres into a single all-binding "theory". The basics are the same, but racing prototype motorcycles is also alot different to riding street bikes... Anyway, I'm interesting to hear your opinions on that...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think it's simply a case of not everyone riding the CSS way, having watched Simon Crafar's video, he doesn't and I'm willing to bet that a lot of others don't either. It's not to say that they're necessarily right to do it like that, but I'm not about to lecture the likes of Lorenzo or Rossi and tell them they're doing it 'wrong'.

I absolutely agree, Steve. I was thinking the opposite way around: what can we learn from the way that Lorenzo, Hayden, Pedrosa, Stoner, and Rossi rides. Maybe there's something we (or, gasp, even Keith!) missed when working out the technology of riding.

 

As an example, CSS clearly recommends that you don't hang out too much: "one cheek is enough" is said in the TOWT2-DVD. But when I watched the MotoGP Qualifying Practice on Saturday (I happened to find a bar in GuangZhou that showed ESPN. Didn't get to see the race due to a 5 hour delayed flight), clearly Stoner is hanging out with BOTH cheeks, and he's actually crawling down on the side of the bike.

 

So how do we go and resolve these two observations into a single common "theory" or "technology"? I have my opinions about this...

 

Kai

 

maybe that is why he has arm pump issues? Vision is what separates a two racers not body position

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...