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Who Do You Think Is "crazy"?


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My friends and family think it is "nuts" that I race motorcycles, and usually the first reaction I get from anyone who asks about it or sees the pictures is "You really do that? You're crazy!"

 

Of course to ME it doesn't feel crazy at all... but recently I watched some guys whose weeekend hobby is to pack a hang glider on top of the car, drive up the side of a mountain, and jump off a steep cliff to ride thermal currents to insane heights.

 

What hobbies seem crazy to you? Let's talk real hobbies, not one-time daredevil experiences, but stuff that people spend time, effort and money on. Here's another one for me: combined driving. These folks get in a little cart behind galloping horses and charge through streams, obstacles, deep mud, and other challenging terrain, at speed. That looks scary to me!

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What hobbies seem crazy to you?

Hottie;

 

I have had enough "close calls" SCUBA diving that I think it is kinda krazy; so did my insurance agent! That said, it isn't as creative as your example so I guess I didn't answer your question correctly. BTW, who thinks up competition events like Combined Driving?

Rain

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Like Rainman, I am also a diver. I'm decompression, advanced nitrox, and cave certified so when you throw track riding motorcycles into the mix most of my friends think I'm crazy. That said, when I see folks jumping out of airplanes I tend to think they are a bit bent. I know that is fairly mainstream now but having grown up the son pilot, jumping out of airplanes is something that will cause this pot to call the kettle black.

 

And what is up with those rock climbers that don't use any safety lines. Crikey that's nuts!

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If you feel in control, it doesn't seem scary. You also have those who say that if you're not scared (doing risky things) you're daft. Other's say that if you're scared, you do not react properly. I hate being scared and back off, but I also enjoy getting close to the limit if I feel I master the task at hand.

 

There is also the thing about imagined danger vs. real danger. If I asked you to cross a 100ft long plank that's 8 inches thick and 12 inches wide sitting a foot over the ground, you could all do that without worry. Now, place the same plank between two 200 story tall buildings and most will decline from even trying to cross. It's no more difficult than having the plank a foot off the ground, the issue is in our heads. Still, if somebody walked between highhouses on a plank on a regular basis, most would call them crazy.

 

But to try and answer the question;

Dowhill skiing

Rapid deep free diving (I think they rush to 300 ft without air supply)

Free climbing as mentioned

Extreme mountain climbing, like Himalaya, regardless of safety gear

Playing with lions and tigers

Balancing like this

prekestol.jpg

604 metres above the seat

 

3bOR7z4MjpOWPyf6YqSusw62MgHUVSgw-IWoGOgGAwVw.jpg

1100 metres above the sea

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People who think driving in a circle for 4 hours is the pinnacle of motor sports, they're crazy

 

I would shout out my agreement but in this part of the world I might be shot for heresy! :lol:

 

You mean like this?

 

Yes just like that!

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It's not a specific hobby, but people who intentionally increase the danger to themselves/others or think the degree of danger defines how "good" something is.

 

Not Crazy:

Skiing the steepest slope you can find

Hiking across a desert to "find yourself"

 

Crazy:

Skiing the steepest slope you can find/handle and intentionally STARTING AN AVALANCHE beforehand

A city-slicker hiking across a desert to "find themselves", but carrying far too little water to "heighten the experience" (ie, 2 liters for a 5-day hike)

 

etc...

 

I've actually seen people DO crazy stuff like this and then wonder why it went wrong.

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^I've thought about it before, I just don't have the coin that would take my training from local NASTAR races to Giant Slalom.

 

But to try and answer the question;

Dowhill skiing

Rapid deep free diving (I think they rush to 300 ft without air supply)

Free climbing as mentioned

Extreme mountain climbing, like Himalaya, regardless of safety gear

Playing with lions and tigers

Balancing like this

In response to your list above, I know/know of people that have done each of those things very successfully (granted, some like the lions take special circumstances).

The key has always been training & mitigating what dangers you can while accepting the dangers you can't realistically mitigate. With that approach, you can do just about anything in a sane manner.

 

OTOH, we likely all understand that a cavalier attitude can turn a sane, fun activity deadly- just look at any kid who buys a liter bike and next week thinks he can imitate Stoner or Rossi on the streets- it's suicide-by-sportbike. Doesn't mean I don't want to wring out a S1000RR on the track, but I'm going to do it realistically.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Crazy acitvities? Stunters. Standing on the seat facing backwards going down the freeway. While playing with your Iphone, taking video's. No thanks! I'd rather jump out of a perfectly good airplane. Actually do that on a regular basis. After it has rolled to a complete stop and prop isn't turning, that is.....

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  • 2 weeks later...

'nother one for Kevin Kane

 

Eirik;

Thanks for putting these up here. Man these really beg the question of riders skill when you consider these guys were riding 500 cc two strokes with a high propensity for high siding without much warning and with tires and suspensions that would be considered dangerous by today's standards. Giving any one of them the same components commonly provided on contemporary street bikes would make them unbeatable back then.

 

Watching MotoGP or even SBK races today it's easy to think that these guys are the best of all time... but when I see these videos from twenty and thirty years ago and compare the lack of 21st century traction control current race bikes have with numerous modes (including anti wheelie) and the "designer" tires made for different tracks each race and then the suspension components available now not to mention ABS and I wonder - how Doohan, Schwantz, Rainey, Roberts, Ago and Mike the Bike would do on a current race grid if time travel could bring them forward.

 

Rain

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Eirik;

Thanks for putting these up here.

 

My pleasure :)

 

 

Man these really beg the question of riders skill when you consider these guys were riding 500 cc two strokes with a high propensity for high siding without much warning and with tires and suspensions that would be considered dangerous by today's standards. Giving any one of them the same components commonly provided on contemporary street bikes would make them unbeatable back then.

 

Watching MotoGP or even SBK races today it's easy to think that these guys are the best of all time... but when I see these videos from twenty and thirty years ago and compare the lack of 21st century traction control current race bikes have with numerous modes (including anti wheelie) and the "designer" tires made for different tracks each race and then the suspension components available now not to mention ABS and I wonder - how Doohan, Schwantz, Rainey, Roberts, Ago and Mike the Bike would do on a current race grid if time travel could bring them forward.

 

Rain

 

I think the best would always have been the best, regardless of era. Imagine the racing if they all lived and raced together at their peak!

 

I also believe that the current level is higher than the level was back then, in that they train more and harder and there are more top guys on competitive material. In Hailwood's and Ago's time, only 2-3 riders had proper material. I mean, one year Ago won the title, the runner-up was a privateer riding a BSA single against Ago's 4-cylinder 500 MV Agusta. Not saying Ago wasn't fantastic, only that he didn't have to ride against 10 other world champions on similar equipment, so his life was easier.

 

That said, I doubt you could put many of today's racers onto Roberts' 1978 500 and expect them to keep up with said Roberts back in 1978 without lots of practice first. Riding today's bikes at 95% is likely far, far easier than riding them old, pesky strokers at 95%. But I don't think it's easier to ride today's bikes at 100%, let alone have the ability to get them set up so they will work.

 

I must say I liked racing far better when the rider mattered the most, not who had the best suspension and electronics team.

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