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Advice On Braking And Body Position


rppngears91
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Hey whats up. Iam having a bit of difficulty with braking while positioned for the turn I am approaching. Coming off a straight, I scoot my bum off the seat and pop my inside knee out and brake, but when I brake I put a huge amount of weight on my handle bars. I know there is a way to keep the weight off the handle bars. Any advice would be appreciated!! Thanks, cya.

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Hey thanks. Thats actually what I started out doing and doesn't feel too awkward, but after watching the pro's (motoGP, AMA ect...) I notice their inside knee is off the tank and out while braking? Or am I mistaken?

 

As you hang your knee and body off to the inside you can use the inside of your thigh (of your outside leg) and jam it against the tank in order to help prevent you from sliding froward while braking.

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Hey thanks. Thats actually what I started out doing and doesn't feel too awkward, but after watching the pro's (motoGP, AMA ect...) I notice their inside knee is off the tank and out while braking? Or am I mistaken?

Only after all the hard braking is done, does the knee come off the tank.

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Hey thanks. Thats actually what I started out doing and doesn't feel too awkward, but after watching the pro's (motoGP, AMA ect...) I notice their inside knee is off the tank and out while braking? Or am I mistaken?

Only after all the hard braking is done, does the knee come off the tank.

 

I know I should be taking any advice I can, but I disagree. After CLOSELY studying all the pro's you can see the front of the bike start to dive (due to braking) at the same time their knee pops off the tank.

 

I have got the inside of my thigh (of my outside leg) to butt up against the tank and help with sliding and keeping most pressure off my bars, but I do notice there is a little bit of pressure. Is this normal or should there be absolutely no pressure on the handle bars

 

Thanks for the tips!!

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Hey if ALL THE PROS are doing it then you should do it that way too. Sorry for the bad advice. Just do it the way the pros do and I'm sure you'll be fine.

 

 

ROFL

 

(Does somebody need a "time out"?)

 

 

Ahem...when I rode big heavy diesels, erm ... I mean four strokes ... I remained on the seat for prolonged heavy braking like one might do at the end of a straightaway slowing for a sharp corner (like not a sweeper) and squeezed the tank with my knees to keep my weight off my hands and the handlebars. I would then slide my butt and hang off immediately prior to initiating turning inputs.

 

On some other types of turns I would hang off first (with my knee tucked in) and use the inside of my thigh to hold myself up. And I would only drop my knee near the apex of the turn to use as a feeler gauge. This could tend to put me in a crossed up position for hanging off (which was what most people tended to do to some degree or another at the time), especially if I sat up from behind the bubble to any degree. Many riders, even PRO's still do that today. That doesn't make it the best way. I would narrow my view to take a look at what most pro champions (winners) are doing.

 

I found using my core muscles to curl my butt under my body and keep my weight in my feet was also helpful. In any case, I have not studied much of the latest riding tech from the school and am not as well versed as some others in what is currently being taught, but, I've heard expressions like "locking on" bandied about and from the context assume that this might have some relevance to what is being discussed here. I'm sure a PRO rider/PRO riding coach like Stuman could fill you in better than I could.

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I just got done watching the sepang Moto GP race and noticed something interesting. Many of the front runners would hold there knee against the tank unil they turned the bike when entering left hand corners. These same riders would stick their knee out early, as soon as they started to brake when entering right hand corners.

 

If you have the race on tape or tivo watch Melandri and Pedrosa going into the last corner and the left hand hairpin in the middle of the track. Both of these corners are very hard braking left handers. Notice how both Melandri and Pedrosa keep both knees against the tank when entering these corners and the don't stick their knee out until they turn the bike.

 

These same two riders will stick their knee out the moment they start braking for turn one, a hard braking right hander.

 

Stoner sticks his knee out early all the time. They didn't show much of Rossi, but it looked like he was doing the same as Pedrosa and Melandri.

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I've been attributing the leg positioning to usage of the rear brake. Maybe I'm totally off base.

 

But it seems like Rossi, Hayden, and others use the rear brakes a fair bit. I would think gripping with both legs can help with rear brake modulation since you can lock in with the left on the tank and aren't completely supported by right leg locking into the tank, allowing easier brake modulation. With right handers, they can just lock in the tank with the left leg, as you don't need as much finesse with the shifter as your rear brake, and let the right foot act as an air brake while still maintaining brake modulation control.

 

Shrugs, any other theories? Maybe I'm totally wrong. Actually, scratch that, probably am wrong. haha..

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