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Throttle Control Rule #1


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I was thinking this morning about throttle control rule #1 and mastery of it's application.

 

I hope that a few of you guys will indulge in a discussion of this rule, obstacles to mastery and steps to overcome and conquer them.

 

I don't have my copy of TOTW2 with me (I'm at work), so would someone like to start us off by quoting the rule and citing it's page #?

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I'm at work, but always carry ATOTW2 with me for reading / re-reading on the train :)

 

Throttle Control / Rule Number One (Section 1, page 7):

"Once the throttle is cracked* on, it is rolled open evenly, smoothly, and constantly* throughout the remainder of the turn."

 

As a beginning track rider, I find that I tend to hold steady speed / throttle until after the apex, at which point I slowly begin to accelerate. I just don't have the experience or comfort level to apply it any earlier. On page 25, the question of "when" is addressed, and the answer is "as soon as possible". Not at, right before, or right after the apex, but as soon as possible and AFTER steering is completed.

 

For me (at my level), making sure I am riding the correct line is easier without the application of additional throttle :)

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Good idea. Remember the basics.

Throttle control rule #1: Once the throttle is cracked on, it is rolled open evenly, smoothly, and constantly throughout the remainder of the turn.

Page 7.

 

I follow this rule consciously. I don't get over as far as I can for the most part, because I'm just there to have a good time, but when I'm going all out, I follow it to the letter. When I'm not pushing it at full lean, I can adjust the bike a lot better and increase or decrease acceleration in the middle of a turn more because of how far I'm leaned over.

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I'm at work, but always carry ATOTW2 with me for reading / re-reading on the train :)

 

Throttle Control / Rule Number One (Section 1, page 7):

"Once the throttle is cracked* on, it is rolled open evenly, smoothly, and constantly* throughout the remainder of the turn."

 

As a beginning track rider, I find that I tend to hold steady speed / throttle until after the apex, at which point I slowly begin to accelerate. I just don't have the experience or comfort level to apply it any earlier. On page 25, the question of "when" is addressed, and the answer is "as soon as possible". Not at, right before, or right after the apex, but as soon as possible and AFTER steering is completed.

 

For me (at my level), making sure I am riding the correct line is easier without the application of additional throttle :)

Cutter. LOL.

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Good idea. Remember the basics.

Throttle control rule #1: Once the throttle is cracked on, it is rolled open evenly, smoothly, and constantly throughout the remainder of the turn.

Page 7.

 

I follow this rule consciously. I don't get over as far as I can for the most part, because I'm just there to have a good time, but when I'm going all out, I follow it to the letter. When I'm not pushing it at full lean, I can adjust the bike a lot better and increase or decrease acceleration in the middle of a turn more because of how far I'm leaned over.

 

To all:

 

While operating at less than 100%, not "pushing it", and staying well within the envelope of traction frees up some attention to learn the track or run drills and allows a rider to "adjust the bike" or to execute mid-turn corrections to their line, the dominant goal, even when "just having fun", is to actually learn the track and gain the ability to choose a good line that follows Throttle Rule #1 (& #2) at any speed without needing to make mid-turn adjustments. Making mid-turn adjustments, steering or throttle, upsets the suspension balance and reduces available traction. Even if one is only having fun, ie. not riding the edge such that a single mistake means a fall, following these rules creates conditions of "max headroom" so that when the inevitable mistake occurs, the rider remains "in control".

 

The thing is, riders fall into habits. And, some of those habits can become automatic responses to emergency situations. So, when the inevitable mistake occurs and the envelope is suddenly reduced, they are instantly in over their head and will revert to survival reaction mode and typically automatically do the wrong thing.

 

Something of interest: all racers will tell you that after getting warmed up and raising their riding to a certain level of skill and concentration, backing off, riding without goals, "just for fun", creates a certain relaxed mental attitude which fosters distraction and increases the chance of making a mistake. The story of the racer who built up a big lead during a race and backed off for the last couple of laps only to make a simple mistake and crash while cruising at 85% is a very common one. Don't get me wrong, I'm not saying that you shouldn't have fun; but, if your idea of fun is being able to ignore the rules, you are headed for trouble, no matter what activity you are participating in.

 

racer

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To all:

 

While operating at less than 100%, not "pushing it", and staying well within the envelope of traction frees up some attention to learn the track or run drills and allows a rider to "adjust the bike" or to execute mid-turn corrections to their line, the dominant goal, even when "just having fun", is to actually learn the track and gain the ability to choose a good line that follows Throttle Rule #1 (& #2) at any speed without needing to make mid-turn adjustments. racer

 

One particular turn at Pocono East had my number for most of the day. Despite being shown, I could not find a line for myself that didn't require a mid turn correction. It wasn't until later in the day that I finally discovered the correct line for my speed / ability. To your point, racer - my goal for the beginning part of next year is to become extremely familiar with the track and be able to consistently follow a good line.

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As a beginning track rider, I find that I tend to hold steady speed / throttle until after the apex, at which point I slowly begin to accelerate. I just don't have the experience or comfort level to apply it any earlier. On page 25, the question of "when" is addressed, and the answer is "as soon as possible". Not at, right before, or right after the apex, but as soon as possible and AFTER steering is completed.

 

For me (at my level), making sure I am riding the correct line is easier without the application of additional throttle :)

 

Why practice one way, and do it "for real" another?

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That's a good point. If I reduce my corner entry speed a bit, pick my line, and apply Rule #1 when steering is completed, I could incorporate practicing the correct method! :)

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As a beginning track rider, I find that I tend to hold steady speed / throttle until after the apex, at which point I slowly begin to accelerate. I just don't have the experience or comfort level to apply it any earlier. On page 25, the question of "when" is addressed, and the answer is "as soon as possible". Not at, right before, or right after the apex, but as soon as possible and AFTER steering is completed.

 

For me (at my level), making sure I am riding the correct line is easier without the application of additional throttle :)

 

Why practice one way, and do it "for real" another?

 

Good question! :)

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That's a good point. If I reduce my corner entry speed a bit, pick my line, and apply Rule #1 when steering is completed, I could incorporate practicing the correct method! :)

 

Good answer! ;)

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Since we all know the rule, why is it that we do not consistently apply it?

That might end up being a philosophy question :)

 

Maybe a bit of self discipline to start off though?.

 

C

 

ps--BLSJDS--good answer as Racer alreayd pointed out.

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Since we all know the rule, why is it that we do not consistently apply it?

I work on my lines often, and between that, letting other riders through, passing, and working on my points, there are times adjustment is required. I'm completely comfortable doing it. Even though they're slower, there are a number of lines that can be taken through a corner, and that's part of the fun for me.

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Since we all know the rule, why is it that we do not consistently apply it?

I work on my lines often, and between that, letting other riders through, passing, and working on my points, there are times adjustment is required. I'm completely comfortable doing it. Even though they're slower, there are a number of lines that can be taken through a corner, and that's part of the fun for me.

You're moving ahead to Rule #2. (LOL)

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Since we all know the rule, why is it that we do not consistently apply it?

I work on my lines often, and between that, letting other riders through, passing, and working on my points, there are times adjustment is required. I'm completely comfortable doing it. Even though they're slower, there are a number of lines that can be taken through a corner, and that's part of the fun for me.

 

No doubt. But Throttle Rule #1 always applies in standard situations, ie. not busy running off the track or avoiding another rider, etc.

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Double post.

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  • 10 years later...
On 11/12/2008 at 11:40 AM, BLSJDS said:

Throttle Control / Rule Number One (Section 1, page 7):

"Once the throttle is cracked* on, it is rolled open evenly, smoothly, and constantly* throughout the remainder of the turn."

On page 25, the question of "when" is addressed, and the answer is "as soon as possible". Not at, right before, or right after the apex, but as soon as possible and AFTER steering is completed.

Question for the forum: Are there any corner types where "as soon as possible" is at, right before, or right after the apex?

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...and since I'd already dug up this old thread in search of nuggets of truth, I figured I'd post this here to help with my (and possibly someone else's) clarification
Cobie Fair said:

Quote

One thing to make sure we are all clear on is the terms being used. We have seen the term "cracked on" mean different things in different countries. As Keith knew it might, he made sure that term was defined: "opened a slitght bit into operation" Twist 2, page 11.

In some places in the world "cracked on" means get into the gas hard!

Can the definition of "cracked on" in the context of TC#1 be further clarified meaning 0% > 5% > then roll on or 0%, 1%, 2%, 3%, 4%, 5% > then roll on?

*Note: 5% is  an arbitrary number to indicate the point where it is considered to have been cracked on

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"Cracked on" is different in some places.  In the UK it used to mean "pin it".  In the US it means, from off throttle, to just begun, take the tension out of the chain.  The roll on part comes next, crack on is finished.

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2 hours ago, Cobie Fair said:

"Cracked on" is different in some places.  In the UK it used to mean "pin it".  In the US it means, from off throttle, to just begun, take the tension out of the chain.  The roll on part comes next, crack on is finished.

Well I’ll be...and after all these years!

I had a coach years before before I attended my 1st CSS advocate taking the slack out of the chain as the first throttle action. Who’d a thunk it was the same idea with different language!

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I thought this post was heading toward a question I have been working on.

If you are in a turn, and following rule #1, are you not heading for a low-side if you over cook it?  Specifically, the idea of 'rolling it on smoothly, evenly, and constantly'.  With a high end machine, this can very easily move from 'just enough' to just too much.

Please help me out here.  This is a daily question on the road, and I am just very unsure if I should be getting all my speed in the short straights, and railing the corner, or if I should be intentionally entering corners with less speed to allow for more to develop during the corner through this steady increase.  The 60/40 rule seems right, but technique seems to be everything.

An important note for my area:  It's western Washington, and damp roads are expected 75% of the year, so the line between grip and slip is a little narrower.

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