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Throttle Control Throgh Chicane, Esses


acebobby
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How would you apply your throttle through a chicane, I mean a full on 90 degree left followed immediately by a 90 degree right where you would need to go to max lean left then right.

I have been going over this in my head and wonder what would be correct, would you turn left then crack the throttle quickly, release it then flick right and follow TC rule 1 through the right or would you take the left on a closed throttle flick it right then apply TC rule 1 through the right?

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Are you riding at Donnington Park? The only time I have experienced this problem is on my MotoGP 08 playstation three at Donnington park......Seriously a good question...I would approach this as I do any 90 degree turn...there is just so much throttle between the exit and entry of the two turns, right? I think the Streets Of Willow has this at turn 13 and 14 but you don;t have time to think about throttle there...It is right knee down...left knee down and it may not be full 90 degree but a lot of fun..

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Now, I know I don't do it right, but when I go in (right then left), I don't full lean in the first. Thats because I'm more concerned with the exit from the 2nd turn. You'll still see me shaking my head after the 1st corner because I never get it right. I'm always more focused on setting up the 2nd because I'll be able to launch into the straight if I get this corner right. Type 1 corners and all.

A long straight puts me into the 1st corner. I get pressure on the front to turn in, small acceleration into 2 so I can get back off the gas and come in with pressure on the front there as well. I apex early because it's a long corner, and I can go over the rumble strips going onto the straights shortening the track.

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To answer your question on throttle control (TC), it would depend on what result you wanted from the exit of the chicane (the last 90 degree right).

 

The key question to ask yourself is: What is the result I want from the corner, or series of corners (in the case of a chicane). It is from here that you work your way backwards.

 

Working backwards. What is the result I want from the exit? What location, speed and direction do I need at the turn point between the two turns (left and right), that will give me the result I want at the exit? Then what location, speed and direction do I need at the entry to the chicane (90 degree left), will give me the result I want at the turn point (90 degree right) to then get the result from the corner at the exit.

 

It's a chain reaction of cause-and-effect. What actions (causes) do I need to do, to get the results (effects) I want?

 

BTW : At Winton Raceway there is a 90 degree left / 90 degree right chicane which leads to the front straight and the start/finish line. For this particular chicane I :- Turn left and apply the TC (rule 1), check the throttle, flick right and back on the gas (TC Rule 1). This is a tight chicane. I can see that on a larger chicane you may even need to brake in-between the turns (Brno).

 

Cheers

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Bones's explanation is a good technic for setting up the entry and exit. A racer friend of mine told me long ago, the most important turn of a series of turns to set up for is the one leading in to a long straight. So if one has a chicane made up of two 90 degree turns, what good does it do to go in to the first hot and miss the entry in to the second? The entry in to the second is critical for getting on the throttle quickly...Right? what about it Bones?

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Bones, I love the working it backwards idea. I have always worked it the other way but backwards seems like an easy way to figure out what you want with what you need to do to produce it.

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Bones, I love the working it backwards idea. I have always worked it the other way but backwards seems like an easy way to figure out what you want with what you need to do to produce it.

 

Also works well with 'symptom' and 'cause'. Typically, when I've made a riding error, it is the 'symptom' that I notice (awareness). The 'cause' of the error is some decision or action I took before, I noticed the 'symptom'.

 

Symptom : Going wide on the exit

Cause : Turning in too early.

 

I'm working my plan for a corner backwards, to help correct errors in my riding.

 

Cheers

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Have been going over your working it out backwards technique in my head bones and it makes perfect sense in every type of corner, you have a good way of explaining things! I also like your symptom and cause method of working out your riding problems, your statement says it all bones, its not how fast you go, its how you go fast!

Cheers

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Here's a video that was posted in "Going to Infineon" section that will show examples of both throttle control and mistakes. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IU2__O67How

First you can "listen to the throttle control" of an AMA racer going through both chicanes and esses at Sears Point. Also in the second lap you can see the consequences of running wide (T-7) where the racer loses touch with the pack and can't make it up.

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Here's a video that was posted in "Going to Infineon" section that will show examples of both throttle control and mistakes. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IU2__O67How

First you can "listen to the throttle control" of an AMA racer going through both chicanes and esses at Sears Point. Also in the second lap you can see the consequences of running wide (T-7) where the racer loses touch with the pack and can't make it up.

It was hard to hear him get it right with all the dang blasted music. It looked to me like he ran wide at around the 3 min mark from running in too deep. Later in the video it seemed that he didn't have reference points and began to turn in too early as he used the bike in front to tell him what to do.

 

So how did I do teach?

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It was hard to hear him get it right with all the dang blasted music. It looked to me like he ran wide at around the 3 min mark from running in too deep. Later in the video it seemed that he didn't have reference points and began to turn in too early as he used the bike in front to tell him what to do.

 

So how did I do teach?

JB;

That's a question for Stuman or Cobie to answer. I get into trouble when I try to sound like I know what I am talking about.

 

Kevin

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It was hard to hear him get it right with all the dang blasted music. It looked to me like he ran wide at around the 3 min mark from running in too deep. Later in the video it seemed that he didn't have reference points and began to turn in too early as he used the bike in front to tell him what to do.

 

So how did I do teach?

JB;

That's a question for Stuman or Cobie to answer. I get into trouble when I try to sound like I know what I am talking about.

 

Kevin

But I did find it interesting that it took him 2 corners to setup that pass. I saw it coming and it was beautiful. I was rolling my right hand wishing I had more power....er... he had more power.

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  • 3 weeks later...
Here's a video that was posted in "Going to Infineon" section that will show examples of both throttle control and mistakes. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IU2__O67How

First you can "listen to the throttle control" of an AMA racer going through both chicanes and esses at Sears Point. Also in the second lap you can see the consequences of running wide (T-7) where the racer loses touch with the pack and can't make it up.

 

Going wide in 7 is easy to do. Going up the drag strip after turn 6 is the fastest part of the track. I pass a lot of guys on the inside of 7 because they make that mistake. It's the bus stop that drizes me crazy. So if someone knows the right line there, please let me know.

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Going wide in 7 is easy to do. Going up the drag strip after turn 6 is the fastest part of the track. I pass a lot of guys on the inside of 7 because they make that mistake. It's the bus stop that drizes me crazy. So if someone knows the right line there, please let me know.

 

We see a lot of errors with throttle control in there, and entry speed on the way in (normally to high).

 

CF

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