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Amazing Front Tire Traction!


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A picture (thanks to Darren Beatty Photography!) from last weekends WMRRA racing. It shows shows the #1 plate holder, Eli Edwards, doing a bit of trail braking past the apex of Turn 5. Pretty amazing level of grip for not only the cornering loads but the stoppie as well.

 

I guess for this instance, getting on the gas "as soon as possible" would involve waiting for the rear tire to touch down...

 

-Sean

post-22201-0-87258200-1335932974_thumb.jpg

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Great pic Sean! Do you know where they were racing?

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Looking at the picture, looks like very little pressure on the brake lever...wonder if most of this could be a slight bump and coming out of the throttle.

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Looking at the picture, looks like very little pressure on the brake lever...wonder if most of this could be a slight bump and coming out of the throttle.

A bounce off that curbing perhaps?

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I was gonna say that too, that the front tyre does not look loaded at all!!! It would have formed quite a contact patch to get that effect under braking, but looks very round and barely touching the tarmac...

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Great photo! Reminds me of alot of the type of that that we usually see from the IoM TT...

 

But really hard to tell what the bike was doing at the time, resting a finger on the brake lever doesn't necessarily mean braking... at first look, I'd be more inclined to think that there was actually not much weight on the front tyre - perhaps it had just touched down after coming over that crest. Similar to this maybe:

 

Iom%20TT-2.jpg

 

 

It also looks like the forks are near fully extended.

 

But yeah - the tyres do have much more grip than probably most people realise, if you let them do their job. As for a leant-over stoppie... I'm skeptical. I am sure it's possible to apply the front brakes while the rear has been unweighted by a crest or similar, but bringing the rear wheel off the ground, while the bike is leaned over, through braking force alone... Hhmmm...

 

Edit to add >> I should clarify that I'm sure it's physically possible, after all there are people who can wheelie out of a turn, so why not do the opposite under brakes? But for someone to have the feel and control for the bike to be leant over, then bring the rear wheel off the ground... that would be a fairly crazy manoeuvre. And before anyone mentions MotoGP or WSBK, etc. - I think we would find that in any instances of the bike leaning, with front brakes applied and the rear wheel off the ground - that the rear wheel was already off the ground, or about to leave the ground before the rider turned. wink.gif For example if a bike had bad chatter, the rider could have turned in and still be on the front brake while the rear wheel bounces a couple of inches off the ground. Which is very different to a stoppie.

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Anybody else watch the MotoGP qualifying today? Was cool the see the replay where most had the rear wheel jump inward when they braked hard for the first corner, most with wheel off the ground. Instinctly, one (well, I) would expect the rear wheel to go towards the outside.

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Interesting that you mention that, I'm just taking a look at QP now...

 

First question for anyone playing at home - when the rear tyre leaves the ground and moves to the inside of the track under braking, what direction is the front wheel travelling? (Does it move closer to, or further from the white line at the edge of the track?) wink.gif

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