Jump to content

Advice


Recommended Posts

Lets say you are in a position to give advice to someone new to the sport. You can see the front straight and the first turn. You have 5 minutes to sum up your experience and send them on their way. It's 2nd call. What do you tell them?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Lets say you are in a position to give advice to someone new to the sport. You can see the front straight and the first turn. You have 5 minutes to sum up your experience and send them on their way. It's 2nd call. What do you tell them?

...to get their affairs in order?

 

Wow Fossil; excellent dialogue generator; let's see how the Forum responds to this one.

 

Rain

Link to comment
Share on other sites

"Advice"? - that's an interesting topic. How does that stack up against Riding Technology?

 

Fossil: when you say 'sport', I guess that you're thinking racing, correct? What's 2nd call?

 

Without having ANY experience in roadracing myself, my 'friendly advice' would be to better go the full distance/race and learn that throw the bike because you wanted to pass someone - following on the axiom of "in order to finish first, first you need to finish".

Like a boxer between rounds, I wouldn't count on saying anything new or different. Just reaffirm the old 2-3 basics: Ref Points, Turn Points, Throttle Control.

 

Enjoy the ride. Remember to breathe!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Assuming this person knows how to operate a motorcylce, it is a track day, and his/her first time out:

 

I suggest he / she takes it easy and stays relaxed. Then I explain the importance of being predictable, what "lines" are, and what is generally considered a good line.

 

I then jump right into throttle control, using very light brakes, and the two step. Throttle, controlled speed, and the importance of vision (where to look, when to look).

 

By this time, 5 minutes are up and the rider has WAY more questions than answers. I leave him or her with a pat on the back and a reminder that adding lean angle AND throttle is a common cause of track day crashes, so be careful. He/she can't really process the jumbled mess of information I've relayed in 5 minutes and only remembers something about throttle, leaning, and crashing.

 

My terrible instruction most likely hinders instead of helps. After he / she high sides, I run into the woods...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My terrible instruction most likely hinders instead of helps. After he / she high sides, I run into the woods...

B;

I'm not sure that what he's after but I LOL'd on this one.

Thanks for that.

 

Rain

 

Glad you caught that :lol: .

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My terrible instruction most likely hinders instead of helps. After he / she high sides, I run into the woods...

 

laugh.gif

 

My advice for them would be "don't crash", "keep it rubber side down" "when in doubt, gas it!" or something helpful like that. tongue.gif (Well you did say they were 'new' to the spot...)

 

But like khp said, "Advice - that's an interesting topic..."

(Hey, that seems really familiar...)

 

 

But in all seriousness, the only "advice" I would really give would be to just ride at their own pace and not try to keep up with faster riders, and enjoy the day. After that I would advise they pick up a copy of Twist of the Wrist and get themselves schooled at CSS.

 

Thinking about a new rider, would they even know what a reference point is? If they do figure out that they need to find points of reference on track, what about the danger that they find too many RP's? Lots of unforeseen consequences can arise from a little friendly advice. Although if they came to me with a specific question, I'd be more comfortable talking that through with them.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Lets say you are in a position to give advice to someone new to the sport. You can see the front straight and the first turn. You have 5 minutes to sum up your experience and send them on their way. It's 2nd call. What do you tell them?

 

Assuming you are talking about a race (not just a track day), I'd say:

Do you have enough gas?

Do you know your grid position, or have it written on your tank?

Do you know the starting procedure?

Then I'd check to make sure their gear was all set (helmet chinstrap fastened, leathers zipped, gloves on, etc.).

If all looked good, I think I'd just say "good luck, and have fun!". :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

this is a funny question, it could be advice for a new racer or someone new to trackdaying. The advice from me would be the same three things:

 

- Look where you want to go!

- Remember to breathe!

- Relax your arms and hands!

 

This from the experience that most people don't crash or do something overly stupid on their first trackday. If anything they will just scare themselves a little bit and the solution to their SR is proper training (which they will be much more motivated for if a few SR have been triggered)

 

Recently I coached a friend new to trackdays (his baseline laptime was 1:35.4 (racers and front running fast group is 1:05)) , we startede at the above three, then continued with:

 

- Bodypositioning (do this early before you need to correct bad habits)

- Counter steering (quick flick)

- The throttle rule

 

Now he felt comfortable on the bike and it behaved predictably due to more steady input from him and laptimes was about 1:27 average.

 

Then we talked:

 

- Lines and where not to go

- RP and how you determine and move them

- Pick up drill ("the Pedrosa")

 

And in the final two sessions he went quite fast (for a newcommer) at a string of 1:22.x and two 1:20.6 laps.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

- Pick up drill ("the Pedrosa")

Pardon me, but it seems you have this confused for "the Stoner". dry.gif

 

tongue.giflaugh.gif

 

Well, Stoner is the fastest thing on two wheels, but that doesn't take away from Pedrosa that he was the first who very visibly did the "stand up and fire away" rutine..

 

 

 

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...