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Hotfoot

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Everything posted by Hotfoot

  1. The data loggers are absolutely incredible in what they do, and small and easy to mount. If you really are interested in one, contact the school office at 800-530-3350. Slicks are really expensive and tires are one of the biggest expenses involved in track riding. If the data logger helps you find the problem with your tire wear (or gives you the info you need to take to your suspension guy or tire guy), it will pay for itself very quickly. The additional riding info that you get that will improve your laptimes will just be a bonus! Edit - BTW if you have a friend that has one, too, you can download your data and compare, creating a "virtual race" type thing where you can overlay your laps and see the differences - where you or your friend is getting on the gas earlier, carrying more speed, braking later, etc., and you can use your combined positive points to improve each other's laptimes. Or just bench race. Anyway it is really great and I highly recommend it!
  2. Since the conditions were a bit wet, and tires were cold, it could be that the bike DID highside but just not as violently as in the video. I'm thinking that if the tire slid out to the rear, but then regained traction (perhaps over an oily patch on the pavement), it could flip it back over to the right but without that violent upward launch, because neither front nor rear tire would have as much grip as what we see in the video on dry pavement. However, I think the scenario John describes above sounds very plausible - even if the wheel just was lifted up a bit by the spring as you went over it, that could take away the resistance on the bars and your countersteering pressure (to lift the bike up out of its lean) would suddenly be too much and cause to the bars to turn too much to the left, so that as the tire lands back on the pavement it would countersteer you into the ground on the right, as John says above. I have had a similar experience on a dirt bike, hitting a round rock mostly hidden under some loose sand - I was leaned a bit to the left and coming up out of a turn, the front wheel was lifted up by the rock and when it came down it slammed me over on the right side. Did you have any sensation of the rear wheel slipping, sliding out, or coming around on you, or any recollection of the bars twisting, or of losing "feel" from the front tire?
  3. The bikes are already in service, the first school was in February. I don't think there was a need to reach out on the forum for volunteers this year.
  4. Yeah, and where is my flying car? I'm sure we were supposed to have those by now.
  5. Yes it sounds like there may be some misunderstanding of the purpose and application of the pick up drill, and some pieces that are missing. I'll PM you and we will get it sorted out.:)
  6. What is your understanding of HOW to do the pickup? How it is different from simply countersteering out of a turn?
  7. Exactly. So does Schuberth, and I think AGV too.
  8. Points 1-4 is covered specifically and in detail in Twist of the Wrist II in Chapter 10: Rider Input, Riding and Sliding. There is a good diagram and description of what the front wheel and the bars will do in a slide, which way they will turn. It also tells you exactly what happens if the rider tries to turn the bars or gives the opposite input. It is better read there than answered here, since there is a thorough explanation, diagram and photo. In regards to your second set of questions - yes the slide would be in the same direction - the angular momentum of the bike would send the rear wheel to the outside of the curve. If the bike is nearly vertical, you are not on a circular trajectory anymore. The front wheel will still turn the same direction as your scenarios above (as described in TOTW II), but if you are mostly upright it wouldn't be much, because at that point you are going mostly straight. The pick up will improve your traction by getting the bike more upright. However it is always possible to upset the chassis or suspension with an overly aggressive bar input; it would seem very unlikely especially in good traction conditions for it to actually cause a crash but possibly if you seriously overloaded the front suspension with a really heavy bar input, way oversteered it, OR unintentionally braced with your other arm thereby loading BOTH bars and creating a rigid transfer point between the bars and your body (and thus the rest of the bike) you could cause a wobble or an unwanted bounce from the front suspension or tire. If a rider tries to do a really aggressive, fast pick up right around the moment where he/she is trying to begin their roll-on, how likely is that the roll on itself will be smooth and progressive? If the roll-on is, as a result, too abrupt, what could happen to the rear tire traction?
  9. The guy on the Ducati would really benefit from CSS Level 3, check out his transitions across the bike (and how the bike reacts) and his lock on, how secure does his lower body look?
  10. Here's some hints on these rear tires slides: LISTEN to the engine, how smooth is the throttle application when leaned over? Watch the rider on the R1s throttle hand - what does he do when the rear tire starts to slide? What control could a rider be using that could cause the rear tire to slide on the entry? What could a rider do on the corner exit that would cause the rear tire to be under much greater load than the front? I'd also ask - especially in the case of the black guy on the black bike near the beginning of the video - what is the condition of the tires, and are they adequately warmed up?
  11. Those are massive changes in lap times, and sounds like you are doing it with a plan, making changes gradually so as not to fire off the SRs, and really using the drills and techniques from the school, great job! Glad to hear you are getting such excellent results, well done!
  12. If so, I stand corrected, what lean angle are we talking about?
  13. There is a section in Ch 13 called "Front End Duties" that talks about how the front end still contributes, and also addresses getting on the gas too early. Notice that when it says in TOTWII that the bike will maintain its lean angle even with the front wheel off the ground, it does NOT say that you have maximum corner speed/traction in that situation (you don't), and the section referenced above on front end duties talks about that. While you do see racers commonly wheelie out of corners, you don't see them wheelie in the middle of the corner at max lean angle, because you just can't load the rear that much at max speed and lean, it would lose traction before it would wheelie. Another thing to note is that while acceleration alone can and does cause wheelies, another thing that can contribute is the release (rebound) of the front suspension as the bike is coming out of the corner, and that may be some of what you are seeing in racing. Some riders - not going to name any names here - when launching a big show-off wheelie, use a sharp suspension compression/rebound to help loft the front.
  14. If you are looking at dates that are closer but are sold out, call the office and ask to be put on the waiting list, sometimes spots open up.
  15. What is the logic behind feeling like you'd need to stand the bike up before leaning it again, or where did the idea come from? Are you talking about a turn where you would need to brake hard before the second steering input?
  16. Glad to hear you are comfortable with what the bike is doing and have a better understanding of it, especially since you were able to use the freed-up attention to improve your focus on the drive out of the corner, that is a great win. So, what is it about those three corners that would get you 4-5 seconds off your lap time? Are they turns leading onto straights, or very long, fast turns...? Since you have data and GPS I'm curious.
  17. The overall grip is reduced so anything relying on tire grip has to be backed off considerably - can't lean over as far, can't brake or accelerate as hard, actions must be smooth and gradual so you have time to feel out the traction. And, of course a variable surface (some areas wetter/slicker than others) makes it even more challenging. I don't know much about this source but here is an article I saw that seems like a decent summary: https://lifeatlean.com/riding-in-the-wet/
  18. Have a look at Twist of the Wrist II, Chapter 13 "Steer for the Rear". The fourth paragraph, in particular, may shed some light on the situation.
  19. Welcome. Share some race stories! Clubman is a fun class, what are you riding?
  20. Wow, great post and great win on getting NINE seconds, that's fantastic. I really like your description of the difference between level 3 and level 4.
  21. Black + gray carries a heavy duty hanger for leathers: http://www.blackandgray.com/products/hangers.html
  22. How old is your brother? What general type of bike - road bike or dirt bike? Does he have any riding experience? Are you in the USA?
  23. I finally bit the bullet and got some Held Phantom II gloves. Haven't had the chance to ride in them yet but they sure are beautifully made, the fit well and the quality and protection seem very impressive and they are comfortable. I'm sure they'll need a little break-in but I look forward to trying them out on the track. I have Alpinestars, too, and I've been very happy with them - my only reason for trying something else is that they changed their sizing and now I am apparently between sizes so they don't fit as well as prior models I've had. I'm excited to try out the Held gloves but they are in a different price category - for features, protection, value and availability it's honestly really hard to beat the Alpinestars.
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