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Timmer

What Electronics Are You Guys Running?

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Hey guys,

 

I'm trying to get this Tuning section started.

 

First and foremost....What kind of aftermarket tuning system are you guys/gals running(Power Commander, Bazzaz, ECUnleashed, etc.)?

 

Why did you choose that system over the others?

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Power Commander 3 USB for me on my CBR600F.

 

I had to change my exhaust to a stainless steel full system, as the stock one rusted a hole through it... That change got me a great big flat spot from 5500 to 7000 RPM. Since putting the Power Commander it is alot smoother delivery of power and the engine really works alot better / more consistently through the entire rev range.

 

I have not custom mapped mine though, as yet... Running a pre-made map for Akra full exhaust and K&N filter, and works nicely!!!

 

Oh I chose the PC3 cuz it is what I know about, and I got it used for less than half price!!

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Hi Tim,

 

Thanks for startiing up this section. As with all the efforts put forth to make this forum what its, we appreciate it!

 

I have a PCIII on my BMW K1200R. KRs are notorious for running lean on the low end, having a flat or dead spot in the mid range, and then coming alive around 6K (and boy does she come alive!). The power commanader was the number one suggestion on the K bike forums and still I waited a year to do it. When I added it I went ahead and had a custom map done (expensive but worth it I believe) and all I can say is the forums were right, the difference in the throttle response is like night and day. And the extra horses were nice too - she's putting 144 to the pavement which can make the front end prone to hooliganistic behaviors....:P .

 

As for why I went Power Commander, it was the recommendation by my local shop (guys I really trust) and the most used model on the K bike forums. I have no frame of reference as to how any of the other makes might perform so I'm looking forward to reading about other member's experiences.

 

Best,

Carey

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That's great to hear guys.

 

Truth be told....I work at Dynojet so it is good to hear that the Power Commander made a difference for you guys. Along those lines...If you guys have any Power Commander questions, I'd be glad to answer them.

 

CBRKid....I used to race a CBR600F and I know exactly the flat spot you are talking about. Getting flat spots is pretty common when you install an aftermarket exhaust.

 

warregl...glad to hear the Power Commander cleaned up the lean spot on your K1200R. Have you ridden one of the new S1000RR's? Those things are impressive. BMW really raised the bar with that bike, especially with the electronics. It really lit a fire under the Japanese manufacturers butt to get more sophisticated electronics on their bikes.

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Hey Timmer,

 

Do you guys make one for the S1000rr, and if so, what would the application/use be for it?

 

CF

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We make a number of things for the S1000RR. This list includes a Power Commander 5, SFM, Autotune, and LCD. We also make a quickshifter, but I think most guys get the package the includes a quickshifter from the factory.

 

Power Commander 5

The Power Commander 5 controls the main fuel injectors. It is used to adjust the fueling of bike. When you install an aftermarket exhaust and/or air filter it changes how much air is flowing through the motor. Now that the air flow is changed, you must also change the amount of fuel delivered to the motor. Most bikes from the factory even have areas where the bike is running a little too lean or rich. The Power Commander allows you to change the fueling so that you can get every bit of performance you paid for.

 

S.F.M.(Secondary Fuel Module)

The Secondary Fuel Module is essentially another Power Commander, but it is used to control the second set of injectors. Most of the new sportbikes(including the BMW S1000RR) have 2 injectors per cylinder. The reason they do is so they can be more precise with their fueling. At lower RPM only the main injectors are used. As the RPM increases and the fuel demand grows, the upper injectors will then also turn on to supply the extra fuel needed. It's equivalent to using two little squirt guns instead of one big one. When and how the secondary injectors come on varies from bike to bike.

 

Autotune

The Autotune product is designed to be used with the Power Commander(and SFM if you have one). It has an oxygen sensor that you place in your exhaust pipe, which measures how rich or lean the motor is running. It constantly communicates with the Power Commander, telling it if the bike is running rich or lean. The Power Commander will then automatically change the fueling to get the fueling of the bike perfect. This is often referred to as a closed loop system. The "loop" is the process of the Autotune measuring and then the Power Commander adjusting. It does this loop over and over...measure, adjust, measure, adjust, measure, adjust.

 

LCD

The LCD allows you to display and record all the things that the Power Commander and Autotune are measuring. It has a touch screen and allows you to see things like throttle position, RPM, gear, speed, fuel change, air/fuel ratio, etc. on gauges while you ride.

 

Phew...hope that answers some questions. I imagine it probably brings up a whole slew of other questions though. Haha.

 

Fire away. :)

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Good question Matt.

 

It depends on what you are looking to do.

 

To my knowledge the BMW Race ECU allows you to adjust fueling, ignition timing, traction control settings, shifter settings, and has a pit lane speed limiter. It also lets you read trouble codes. Not sure how much the BMW ECU costs, but they are usually pretty expensive.

 

The PC5 will adjust the fueling. I would be willing to bet it is much cheaper than the race ECU. If you add the SFM you get full fuel control and can also add our quickshifter which is adjustable...the stock quickshifter on the S1000RR works pretty good though. One thing I forgot to mention...we are also planning on developing an Ignition Module for the S1000RR, which gets you ignition timing control, a pitlane speed limiter, and also launch control.

 

If you just want to put an exhaust on and get it to run right, I would go with a Power Commander. You probably don't need the SFM unless you're doing something like putting a turbocharger on and need A LOT of fuel or don't have the stock quickshifter and want to add ours on. You can always add the Ignition Module later if you want to screw around with ignition timing, the pitlane limiter, or launch control.

 

If you are interested in messing around with EVERYTHING and don't mind spending the cash, go with the Race ECU.

 

Hope that helps. Please let me know if you have any other questions.

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Timmer, glad you know about the CBR600F.

 

Scenario -

I am using DynoJet's readily available maps... First map I tried was for just an end can and K&N. Bike really woke up!! No more flat spot!! But when I looked at the Map values there were some REALLY lean areas (well, not necessarilt lean but leanER than stock), like -15 to -18 in 20-40% throttle... Now, the bike works better, but I went the safe route and use now a map with not so much drastic leaning of the mixture...

 

My general question is - With the pre made maps from Dyno Jet, is there any chance of engine damage from being too lean?? The engine runs smoothly, no roughness at idle, no popping or backfiring... I think I am good to go, but would like your opinion...

 

Thanks,

 

Jason.

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warregl...glad to hear the Power Commander cleaned up the lean spot on your K1200R. Have you ridden one of the new S1000RR's? Those things are impressive. BMW really raised the bar with that bike, especially with the electronics. It really lit a fire under the Japanese manufacturers butt to get more sophisticated electronics on their bikes.

 

Indeed I have. I've used the school's S1000RRs for all my classes and I have considered trading the KR on one. Sadly the current market is not condusive to selling an esoteric naked German motorcycle unless you are willing to take a serious arse kicking and I just can't justify having two of them...yet. Another couple of track days on one and I might change my mind. :D

 

BTW...Are the Autotune, SFM, and LCD exclusive to the PC5 or will they work with other models?

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Hey Jason,

 

When we make our maps we are pretty conservative with leaning the bikes out. We usually error on the rich side. However, there are some bikes that run ridiculously rich from the factory and we have to subtract quite a bit of fuel to get them to run properly. Most of the time this is in the low to mid range areas. For example, I had a 2006 ZX10r and it was running really rich in the mid range(about 11.8:1) even after I put on a full race exhaust that was flowing a lot more air. There were some areas of my map where I was taking out as much as 25% fuel!

 

If the bike is truly running too lean you will probably notice some unfavorable running conditions of the bike before it does any real damage. The bike will usually run rough or have a "flat spot", you will see higher engine temperatures, and you might even catch it pinging(knocking). If you notice any of these things, I would suggest you take it to a tuning center immediately. You can also buy products that you can use to monitor the air/fuel ratio while you ride(if you would like).

 

Tell you what...I will post a new thread and go over some things about air/fuel ratio. I think that might help shed a little more light on some of this stuff.

 

In the mean time...if you are concerned at all about your bike running lean, take it to a tuning center. The money they will charge you is well worth the piece of mind in my opinion.

 

Hope that helps.

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warregl...glad to hear the Power Commander cleaned up the lean spot on your K1200R. Have you ridden one of the new S1000RR's? Those things are impressive. BMW really raised the bar with that bike, especially with the electronics. It really lit a fire under the Japanese manufacturers butt to get more sophisticated electronics on their bikes.

 

Indeed I have. I've used the school's S1000RRs for all my classes and I have considered trading the KR on one. Sadly the current market is not condusive to selling an esoteric naked German motorcycle unless you are willing to take a serious arse kicking and I just can't justify having two of them...yet. Another couple of track days on one and I might change my mind. :D

 

BTW...Are the Autotune, SFM, and LCD exclusive to the PC5 or will they work with other models?

 

Haha...sounds like a few more days on one of the school's bikes, and you might have a tough decision to make! :)

 

As far as the Autotune and SFM go...yes, they are designed to work with the PC5 only(not PCIIIUSB). We offer the Autotune for any bike that we make a PC5 for. We only offer the SFM's for bikes that have 8 injectors. We offer the LCD for both the PCIIIUSB and PC5.

 

I did some digging and we have a Power Commander 5 that will work for your bike if you're interested in upgrading. The Power Commander 5 part number is 12-004(2009-12 BMW K1300R). It's not listed in our catalog for your bike, but it should work. We changed over to using Power Commander 5's in 2009, which is why we don't have one specified for your bike in the catalog.

 

Hope that answers your questions. Please let me know if you have any others.

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I have a PC3USB on my roadbike (R1 2003). I used to have an Akropovic Ti slip-on, but I grew old,boring and found the extra noise irritating so I've taken it off again. I downloaded a 'standard' map from the website, and installed it myself. Work very well, no noticeable flats or anything. But I had the workshop (Lydmuren MC) I use give it a spin on the bench. The owner (who's quite good at tuning in PC's, although not an official dynojetter) adjusted the jetting below 40% throttle (IIRC he added a bit of fuel) - above the 40%, the jetting was spot on. When riding the bike afterwards, I noticed that the feeling of the throttle crack-on was even better than before :)

My only downside with the PC3 is the fact that it will drain the battery in less than 2 weeks, so either I have to ride the bike at least once a week, or I have to put a maintenance charger on the battery. My guess is that there's something wrong with the particular PC3USB, since I've never heard of other PC3USBs doing the same.

 

On my R6 2008 racebike, I replaced the PC3USB (sorry Timmer) with the official YEC kitbox and wiring loom. The YEC kitbox's matrix for adjusting the fuel is more coarse in the RPM scale than a PC3, so some people stack the kitbox AND the PC3. However, the YEC kitbox gives you 2 fuel maps, advance/retard ignition, cutting ignition for quick shifting, and a host of other stuff I've forgotten. It seriously reprograms the display (e.g. you get temp instead of speed), and one thing that annoys me is that it no longer turns on the neutral lamp. There's a switch on the left handlebar for selecting maps on-the-run, which is really nice for testing out map changes. For example, the bike felt a little jerky getting on the gas (too lean), so I gave it a bit more fuel in the bottom in map 2, checked it out in the next session, and copied the setting into map 1 once I was happy with the change.

I've added a Cordona strain-gauge GP quickshifter which turned out to be 100% plug-and-play (it plugs into the YEC harness and signals the kitbox). Biggest problem was that it took me some time to stop blipping the throttle when I wanted to change gears :D

 

 

Kai

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I have a PC3USB on my roadbike (R1 2003). I used to have an Akropovic Ti slip-on, but I grew old,boring and found the extra noise irritating so I've taken it off again. I downloaded a 'standard' map from the website, and installed it myself. Work very well, no noticeable flats or anything. But I had the workshop (Lydmuren MC) I use give it a spin on the bench. The owner (who's quite good at tuning in PC's, although not an official dynojetter) adjusted the jetting below 40% throttle (IIRC he added a bit of fuel) - above the 40%, the jetting was spot on. When riding the bike afterwards, I noticed that the feeling of the throttle crack-on was even better than before :)

My only downside with the PC3 is the fact that it will drain the battery in less than 2 weeks, so either I have to ride the bike at least once a week, or I have to put a maintenance charger on the battery. My guess is that there's something wrong with the particular PC3USB, since I've never heard of other PC3USBs doing the same.

 

On my R6 2008 racebike, I replaced the PC3USB (sorry Timmer) with the official YEC kitbox and wiring loom. The YEC kitbox's matrix for adjusting the fuel is more coarse in the RPM scale than a PC3, so some people stack the kitbox AND the PC3. However, the YEC kitbox gives you 2 fuel maps, advance/retard ignition, cutting ignition for quick shifting, and a host of other stuff I've forgotten. It seriously reprograms the display (e.g. you get temp instead of speed), and one thing that annoys me is that it no longer turns on the neutral lamp. There's a switch on the left handlebar for selecting maps on-the-run, which is really nice for testing out map changes. For example, the bike felt a little jerky getting on the gas (too lean), so I gave it a bit more fuel in the bottom in map 2, checked it out in the next session, and copied the setting into map 1 once I was happy with the change.

I've added a Cordona strain-gauge GP quickshifter which turned out to be 100% plug-and-play (it plugs into the YEC harness and signals the kitbox). Biggest problem was that it took me some time to stop blipping the throttle when I wanted to change gears :D

 

 

Kai

 

 

Hey Kai,

 

Glad to hear the Power Commander made your roadbike run well. No worries on running the YEC stuff...I realize that there are other products out there.

 

I have also heard about guys running the YEC stuff with a Power Commander. Some of the AMA racers do that. They like using the PC5 and Autotune, but also want some of the features that the YEC stuff has.

 

Just curious....Now that you've run the YEC stuff for a while...how do you like it? What features do you like most?

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Timmer

 

You hear anyone pulling data off the dataloggers?

 

Ago

 

Graves is probably using the data logging, but most of the other privateer AMA guys aren't as far as I know. I haven't heard of any street riders using the datalogging either.

 

A lot of the privateer AMA guys are using the Starlane GPS for datalogging.

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I'm running the Bazzaz gear with TC and quickshift on my K6 GSX-R1000. It's a bit of a mystery brand out here in Australia - I think it is actually banned from the local/national race series, so practically no one bothers with it. But I wanted it because I didn't want to feel left out riding a bike with no traction control and no quickshift. :lol: It's worked so far - I stopped lusting over any new bikes... for now...

 

Only other mods are a BMC road/street air filter and an M4 GP exhaust. That exhaust ended up being a real hassle to tune, from what I can gather. There was alot of dyno time (more than one day), but I'm glad that I got it done by a reliable shop, and they spent the time to get it right. The difference after I picked it up was night and day - the first thing I noticed was that it was just so so much smoother, even compared to the OEM fuel map with the stock exhaust fitted. After that I decided that a dyno tune would be one of the very first things to have done to any other bike I own. All that wiring was a real mess to install though, had one connector plugged into the wrong spot and was going out of my mind. Lesson learnt, double check each plug against the instructions. :P I think I managed to keep it all fairly neat though:

 

166264_1408305342386_1675029522_786017_4808201_n.jpg

 

I also have the Bazzaz TC trim & map switches - I had planned to get two dyno maps done, one for the open exhaust and another for use with the quiet baffle. Turns out the quiet baffle was really not so good to use... the guy at the shop mentioned that I was just ridiculous how much it restricted the exhaust flow, and that it could cause problems with additional heat etc. So that plan was ditched. The below dyno graph shows before the tune, with the quiet baffle fitted - compared with afterwards and the open exhaust:

 

249422_1606032365438_1675029522_1064996_2336028_n.jpg

 

The exhaust is hella loud - the poor guys working at the shop were nearly deafened even though they were outside the dyno booth. :lol:

 

So now whenever I see people asking about the M4 GP exhaust I warn them off the baffle. Sounds awesome, I just ride very sedately around town and I haven't got any tickets yet...

 

I did get a bung welded in the exhaust for the O2 sensor to be used with the AFM module. I went out one night and started to tune that, but found it to be very tedious, which is when I just decided to go with the dyno tune.But now that I've got a good base map it's handy to have the AFM sitting in the shed in case I change any other parts and want to make a tweak. (Although everything around the exhaust and fairings was really tight, with the O2 sensor it doesn't all fit ideally, but that's another story.)

 

 

A question about the O2 sensor that comes with the PC5 - do you advise people to remove it after tuning, or just to leave them in? I read a bit about problems with water fouling the sensor and even the sensor just getting 'used up' after a period of time? That's one of the problems I have - no room to put the bung on the top half of the exhaust so it's practically on the bottom... which is why I didn't want to leave it sitting installed for too long.

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Hey Kai,

 

Glad to hear the Power Commander made your roadbike run well. No worries on running the YEC stuff...I realize that there are other products out there.

 

I have also heard about guys running the YEC stuff with a Power Commander. Some of the AMA racers do that. They like using the PC5 and Autotune, but also want some of the features that the YEC stuff has.

 

Just curious....Now that you've run the YEC stuff for a while...how do you like it? What features do you like most?

I ran the YEC stuff all 2011 (about 6 days of riding due to weather and other priorities) and can't really complain - it's just been working: injection, quickshift, etc.

On the other hand, I can't say that I'm utilizing all the features the system has. It's nice that it's a single integrated system with a pruned down wiring loom, single SW package for controlling everything, and you can use a 'simple' straing-gauge quickshifter and just plug it in (€220 instead of €420).

On the downside, I was surprised that they didn't deliver connector kits for on/off switch, QS input etc in the kit which is around €1000 (wiring loom, ECU, data cable).

 

On the mechanical side, one of the best things I've done is to replace the original "slipper" clutch with an aftermarket slipper from Sigma. Previously the rear tire would squirm under hard braking and slamming down through the gear - now it's dead straight (until I lift the rear...). Took maybe a couple of laps to really trust this, and off you go :)

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I'm running the Bazzaz gear with TC and quickshift on my K6 GSX-R1000. It's a bit of a mystery brand out here in Australia - I think it is actually banned from the local/national race series, so practically no one bothers with it. But I wanted it because I didn't want to feel left out riding a bike with no traction control and no quickshift. :lol: It's worked so far - I stopped lusting over any new bikes... for now...

 

Only other mods are a BMC road/street air filter and an M4 GP exhaust. That exhaust ended up being a real hassle to tune, from what I can gather. There was alot of dyno time (more than one day), but I'm glad that I got it done by a reliable shop, and they spent the time to get it right. The difference after I picked it up was night and day - the first thing I noticed was that it was just so so much smoother, even compared to the OEM fuel map with the stock exhaust fitted. After that I decided that a dyno tune would be one of the very first things to have done to any other bike I own. All that wiring was a real mess to install though, had one connector plugged into the wrong spot and was going out of my mind. Lesson learnt, double check each plug against the instructions. :P I think I managed to keep it all fairly neat though:

 

166264_1408305342386_1675029522_786017_4808201_n.jpg

 

I also have the Bazzaz TC trim & map switches - I had planned to get two dyno maps done, one for the open exhaust and another for use with the quiet baffle. Turns out the quiet baffle was really not so good to use... the guy at the shop mentioned that I was just ridiculous how much it restricted the exhaust flow, and that it could cause problems with additional heat etc. So that plan was ditched. The below dyno graph shows before the tune, with the quiet baffle fitted - compared with afterwards and the open exhaust:

 

249422_1606032365438_1675029522_1064996_2336028_n.jpg

 

The exhaust is hella loud - the poor guys working at the shop were nearly deafened even though they were outside the dyno booth. :lol:

 

So now whenever I see people asking about the M4 GP exhaust I warn them off the baffle. Sounds awesome, I just ride very sedately around town and I haven't got any tickets yet...

 

I did get a bung welded in the exhaust for the O2 sensor to be used with the AFM module. I went out one night and started to tune that, but found it to be very tedious, which is when I just decided to go with the dyno tune.But now that I've got a good base map it's handy to have the AFM sitting in the shed in case I change any other parts and want to make a tweak. (Although everything around the exhaust and fairings was really tight, with the O2 sensor it doesn't all fit ideally, but that's another story.)

 

 

A question about the O2 sensor that comes with the PC5 - do you advise people to remove it after tuning, or just to leave them in? I read a bit about problems with water fouling the sensor and even the sensor just getting 'used up' after a period of time? That's one of the problems I have - no room to put the bung on the top half of the exhaust so it's practically on the bottom... which is why I didn't want to leave it sitting installed for too long.

 

 

Dang! Nice explanation mugget...Looks like she's making pretty good power too!

 

To answer your question on the O2 sensors....

The O2 sensors that the PC5/Autotune uses are heated when they are being used. Just like anything else, they do wear out, but the sensor life on those is pretty good. I've heard of guys that have been running them for years and they are still working fine. What really kills the sensor life is if you have it in the exhaust stream, but it is not being heated(not hooked up).

 

So I'd suggest either leaving it in and connected, or taking it out completely.

 

I've heard that some guys will leave the O2 sensors in(and let Autotune make small adjustments), and I've also heard of guys that take them out as soon as they get the bike tuned how they want.

 

Make sense?

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Hey Kai,

 

Glad to hear the Power Commander made your roadbike run well. No worries on running the YEC stuff...I realize that there are other products out there.

 

I have also heard about guys running the YEC stuff with a Power Commander. Some of the AMA racers do that. They like using the PC5 and Autotune, but also want some of the features that the YEC stuff has.

 

Just curious....Now that you've run the YEC stuff for a while...how do you like it? What features do you like most?

I ran the YEC stuff all 2011 (about 6 days of riding due to weather and other priorities) and can't really complain - it's just been working: injection, quickshift, etc.

On the other hand, I can't say that I'm utilizing all the features the system has. It's nice that it's a single integrated system with a pruned down wiring loom, single SW package for controlling everything, and you can use a 'simple' straing-gauge quickshifter and just plug it in (€220 instead of €420).

On the downside, I was surprised that they didn't deliver connector kits for on/off switch, QS input etc in the kit which is around €1000 (wiring loom, ECU, data cable).

 

On the mechanical side, one of the best things I've done is to replace the original "slipper" clutch with an aftermarket slipper from Sigma. Previously the rear tire would squirm under hard braking and slamming down through the gear - now it's dead straight (until I lift the rear...). Took maybe a couple of laps to really trust this, and off you go :)

 

 

Hey khp,

 

Glad you're liking the YEC stuff. It is definitely nice to have it all in one box.

 

Ya know it's tough for us....we try to modularize our products because we don't if a guy wants EVERYTHING or just enough to tune his bike for the exhaust he just bought. There are definitely pros and cons for either way.

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Glad you're liking the YEC stuff. It is definitely nice to have it all in one box.

 

Ya know it's tough for us....we try to modularize our products because we don't if a guy wants EVERYTHING or just enough to tune his bike for the exhaust he just bought. There are definitely pros and cons for either way.

Yeah you can't really cater to all needs and desires. Well, you could ... but it wouldn't be economically viable for Dynojet to do it.

 

I just remembered yesterday what really makes the YEC box stand out from the PC3: midrange power. With the YEC box, the R6 will do a very controlled wheelie under hard acceleration, something I've never experienced when running with the PC3 (on the same bike) - several racers I know have noticed this too about the YEC box.

 

I cannot give you hard data, since this would require two dynoruns back to back with each setup (and it takes 1-2 hours to swap the wiring loom over), something I've never bothered to do. But if you really want to know why, it should be simple enough to buy a YEC box with loom and data cable and try it at Dynojet HQ ;)

 

Kai

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Glad you're liking the YEC stuff. It is definitely nice to have it all in one box.

 

Ya know it's tough for us....we try to modularize our products because we don't if a guy wants EVERYTHING or just enough to tune his bike for the exhaust he just bought. There are definitely pros and cons for either way.

Yeah you can't really cater to all needs and desires. Well, you could ... but it wouldn't be economically viable for Dynojet to do it.

 

I just remembered yesterday what really makes the YEC box stand out from the PC3: midrange power. With the YEC box, the R6 will do a very controlled wheelie under hard acceleration, something I've never experienced when running with the PC3 (on the same bike) - several racers I know have noticed this too about the YEC box.

 

I cannot give you hard data, since this would require two dynoruns back to back with each setup (and it takes 1-2 hours to swap the wiring loom over), something I've never bothered to do. But if you really want to know why, it should be simple enough to buy a YEC box with loom and data cable and try it at Dynojet HQ ;)

 

Kai

 

Hmm...that is interesting.

 

One of the things I know you can do with the YEC stuff is change the fly-by-wire throttle profile. The Power Commander can't change that. That could definitely have an effect in the mid range.

 

Maybe this could possibly be the change you are noticing?

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I just remembered yesterday what really makes the YEC box stand out from the PC3: midrange power. With the YEC box, the R6 will do a very controlled wheelie under hard acceleration, something I've never experienced when running with the PC3 (on the same bike) - several racers I know have noticed this too about the YEC box.

Hmm...that is interesting.

 

One of the things I know you can do with the YEC stuff is change the fly-by-wire throttle profile. The Power Commander can't change that. That could definitely have an effect in the mid range.

 

Maybe this could possibly be the change you are noticing?

Clearly, the YEC loom+ECU is a complete replacement of the ECU, so they can reprogram everything, including the throttle profile.

 

But after thinking about this for some time, I don't think it's the throttle profile that is changed: in both cases we're talking about WOT, but the engine is not at max torque/rpm (... well, at least as I recall it. No datalogging either. Yet).

 

But maybe they are have a different ignition timing profile or air funnel lift, than stock. But this is guesswork, and since the bike and I are separated by around 6000miles, I have no way of testing the hypotheses we make. Your guess is likely to be better than mine :)

 

Kai

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Good thoughts there Kai.

 

One thing though with a fly by wire systems...even if you are WOT that doesn't necessarily mean that the throttle blades are all the way open. You will notice this the most at lower-mid RPM. You could have the throttle all the way to the stop, but the throttle blades might only be 50% open because of the fly by wire. On a stock R6 the throttle blades don't go to 100% until about 7-8000RPM. The throttle blades also back off to 80% at around 14000RPM. A small change to the fly by wire profile in these areas would be noticeable for sure.

 

Like you said, it could also be the ignition timing profile or the YCC-I profile. Those would also be noticeable.

 

You might see if you can find a stock configuration that you can load and view in your YEC. Then you could compare the two. I'm not really sure where you could find that, but I would be really interested to see what the difference between the two is.

 

Cool stuff.

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Hey Timmer.

 

The more I think about it, the more I'm leaning towards a changed air funnel lift profile. Yamaha definitely added a funnel lift mechanism the '08- model and the '06-'07 models for improved midrange power.

 

Kai

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