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Becoming A Better Track Rider


acebobby
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Throughout various discussions on this forum I have decided to increase my time on the track, I will be doing levels 2 and 3 at the school, as many track days at my local track (knockhill) as my shifts will allow, which usually is not alot 2-3 times, and my annual trip to the nurburgring! I am also intending to travel to England 7-8 times throughout the year for trackdays and am going to book for donington gp circuit for march!

My question is do you think I would improve faster if I just kept going to donington all year or should I try a different circuit every time I travel down to England?

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Throughout various discussions on this forum I have decided to increase my time on the track, I will be doing levels 2 and 3 at the school, as many track days at my local track (knockhill) as my shifts will allow, which usually is not alot 2-3 times, and my annual trip to the nurburgring! I am also intending to travel to England 7-8 times throughout the year for trackdays and am going to book for donington gp circuit for march!

My question is do you think I would improve faster if I just kept going to donington all year or should I try a different circuit every time I travel down to England?

 

 

cant really answer your question but MAN im jealous...lol

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By riding only the same track all the time you would become comfortable and fast with the one track, but as a whole you would become a better overall rider by mixing it up and riding different tracks to experience more variety and challenges.

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I'd guess it's both. If I kept riding Firebird West all the time, I would get better at that track, but still be limited to the kind of corners that track has. I would be able to learn those corners, and ultimately be improved on similar corners. The one thing I WOULD have is redundance. But by riding East track I learned right handed corners A LOT better. The next time I went I was even better at West track than I was before.

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I think the key to improving doesn't mean you have to ride multiple tracks to go faster but to implement the training and experience to a track or to changing conditions. If I ride at VIR for example and I want to go three seconds faster around the track, do my references points change? Do I apply brakes at a different marker? Do I shift at different points? Does it really matter that I am on the same track layout?

I reported in a thread not long ago about riding two different bikes at Barber, a 600rr and 1000rr. My times were almost identical. Why? the same reference points, the same braking markers, the same entry speed, the same exit speed. I have to change these to go faster. Its not the track that needs to be different, it's me.

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One benefit of riding different tracks is being forced to apply your skills in a different environment. I encourage guys to do it.

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OK so I have booked my first track day of the year at donington gp circuit for march, its a 7hr drive for me so will be using a yamaha R6 hire bike for that day, thanks for all your input on this topic guys I think I will mix it up a bit throughout the year and try different tracks each time!

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OK so I have booked my first track day of the year at donington gp circuit for march, its a 7hr drive for me so will be using a yamaha R6 hire bike for that day, thanks for all your input on this topic guys I think I will mix it up a bit throughout the year and try different tracks each time!

 

Let us know how it goes after you come back. Haven't been to Donnington yet, like to for sure.

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There are only so many types of corners. True, the flow of a track changes, but you only have:

Radii changes

Elevation Changes

Camber Changes

 

And that it!!!!

 

Correct; there are only Radius, Elevation and Camber changes on any track (or road). But, what happens when you put several of these into the one corner? One of the characteristics of a race track that is different compared to a normal road, is that the track is designed to be challenging, usually the public road is designed to be safe.

 

Take Southern Loop (Turn 2) at Phillip Island. There are technically 3 radius changes and two elevation changes (which inherently gives us chamber changes). You could also add weather conditions to the equation, as this corner is exposed to the elements. Then you can add 38 other adrenalin crazed racers that want the same bit of tarmac as you for some excitement. Also at Phillip Island, several corners have a different camber depending on how wide you are on the corner. Turn 1, the closer to the ripple strip, the better the camber (and less bumps). Also on Lukey Heights (Turn 9), the wider you are, the more off camber the corner becomes. Why do you want to be wider? Because that is how you can set yourself up for a passing move on the next corner, which is the last opportunity before the finish line (unless your confident of a slip stream pass).

 

 

So yes, we can have multiple Radius, Elevation and Camber changes in a single corner, but also add velocity and direction changes (angle you approach the corner), and you now have the reason I get up at stupid times of the morning to go to a race track. ;)

 

 

Cheers

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There are only so many types of corners. True, the flow of a track changes, but you only have:

Radii changes

Elevation Changes

Camber Changes

 

And that it!!!!

 

Correct; there are only Radius, Elevation and Camber changes on any track (or road). But, what happens when you put several of these into the one corner? One of the characteristics of a race track that is different compared to a normal road, is that the track is designed to be challenging, usually the public road is designed to be safe.

 

 

 

The flaw in the public roads safety design is the fact they let cars on them!

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There are only so many types of corners. True, the flow of a track changes, but you only have:

Radii changes

Elevation Changes

Camber Changes

 

And that it!!!!

 

Correct; there are only Radius, Elevation and Camber changes on any track (or road). But, what happens when you put several of these into the one corner? One of the characteristics of a race track that is different compared to a normal road, is that the track is designed to be challenging, usually the public road is designed to be safe.

 

 

 

The flaw in the public roads safety design is the fact they let cars on them!

 

True ... but you can use them as a mobile chicanes . . . :blink:

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