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Changing Tires


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Another question related to tires- getting them changed. It seems a couple of options exist that I've seen:

 

- have the place where you buy the tires from change them. No tools or stands needed but it's probably the most expensive option

- have a trackside vendor do it for you. Less expensive.

- Put your bike on stands, take the wheels of and go and have someone do it.

- Get one of the tire changing fixture gadgets and do it all yourself. Some initial investment required, but then you (and all your friends) can change whenever you need.

 

I saw a demo of one of those "no-mar" tire changers by a vendor at Moto GP and it seemed like a nice way to go. Any reasons not to start doing this yourself?

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Another question related to tires- getting them changed. It seems a couple of options exist that I've seen:

 

- have the place where you buy the tires from change them. No tools or stands needed but it's probably the most expensive option

- have a trackside vendor do it for you. Less expensive.

- Put your bike on stands, take the wheels of and go and have someone do it.

- Get one of the tire changing fixture gadgets and do it all yourself. Some initial investment required, but then you (and all your friends) can change whenever you need.

 

I saw a demo of one of those "no-mar" tire changers by a vendor at Moto GP and it seemed like a nice way to go. Any reasons not to start doing this yourself?

First: Link, please?

 

The only reason I can come up with is that you either don't want to get your hands dirty with it (yes, brake dust and the chain is dirty) or you don't change tires very often.

 

The club I am a member of bought a second-hand professional electro/pneumatic tire-changing machine 7 years ago, and we've been using it since then (it needs repairs/replacements from the use). Using it requires minimal training (1-time demo/instruction) and once you have the knack of it, it is easy and fairly quick to do. I have recently bought a manual machine for doing it at track days.

I am waiting to buy a balancing stand for the spring season so I can change tires when I want it :angry:

 

 

Kai, itching to go to the workshop and do stuff after watching too many OnTheThrottle.TV videos lately.

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Another question related to tires- getting them changed. It seems a couple of options exist that I've seen:

 

- have the place where you buy the tires from change them. No tools or stands needed but it's probably the most expensive option

- have a trackside vendor do it for you. Less expensive.

- Put your bike on stands, take the wheels of and go and have someone do it.

- Get one of the tire changing fixture gadgets and do it all yourself. Some initial investment required, but then you (and all your friends) can change whenever you need.

 

I saw a demo of one of those "no-mar" tire changers by a vendor at Moto GP and it seemed like a nice way to go. Any reasons not to start doing this yourself?

 

No reason at all to not do it yourself.

 

But taking to consideration all the costs involved on both sides. Everyone is different, some riders have the $ and don't want to mess with it. Others are real hands on and want to do it themselves. Its a personal choice.

 

Also consider doing it on a barrel with tire irons. Its even less expensive than a tire machine and if you take your time and do it right you will have no issues.

 

Its a personal choice.

 

Just don't neglect to balance the tire. Its an important part of mounting your tires.

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First: Link, please?

Sorry, here's the link. I talked to the guys selling it and they said for sportbikes, the basic classic model is all you need. My last track day I saw a guy using one and asked him about it and he seemed happy with it (it was his buddy's)- he had one good comment too- it comes in a floor-mount or a trailer hitch model. His friend bought the trailer hitch model, and then made a receiver mounted to his garage wall at home so he could use the same model at home or at the track.

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First: Link, please?

Sorry, here's the link.

Thanks. I've seen it "live" and while it looks very convincing, it seems like it's taking a lot of space up, even when disassembled for transport.

 

Besides the ultra-cheap manual "machines" (like this), there's this one by GP503 in Germany (sorry, webpage is only available in german), with a nylon "head" that touches the wheel.

 

 

Kai

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Many moons ago I fitted a Conti K112 tyre on the rim belonging to my XS500 from 1976. The tyre was increadibly stiff - it didn't even need air to keep its profile despite carrying the weight of the bike. It was also a real PITA to get seated. In the end I succeeded after drowning the bead in soap and using 90 PSI repeatedly while bouncing the wheel around with and without pressure. Amazingly, the tube, tyre and rim all sustained the abuse and I got to live another day. It wasn't until later I learned how stupid I had been.

 

I prefer to have people with real tools and experience handle my tyre changes these days wink.gif

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being hands on, I love having the ability to change my tyres. If you get serious on track you'll quickly realize the savings.

 

My setup is similar to a Harbour Freight unit (google), but I purchased polyethylene bar stock, angle ground them down and fitted them to the mount/demount bar. Never a scratch and it takes moments to change a tyre. I think I have a video of it :D

 

Yep, found it, this is me showing a buddy how to use it, I'm the fatty in the pink shirt.

 

P.s. Apologies for the music :D

 

P.p.s. Without this, changing from road tyres to slicks for trackdays would be too cost prohibitive. All up cost for this unit was about $200 then $20 of polyethylene (same poly as the no-mar bar)

 

P.p.p.s. Change your tyre valves regularly, they're cheap to buy a bunch of quality ones and considering the consequence of a failed one its well worth it.

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Nice Jason, but men call it Salmon not pinkwink.gif Where did you get the tire changing setuo from? Wouldnt mind getting one

 

Remeber when changing the tires to make sure the DIRECTION ARROW is going the right way, I've had it happen twice where a shop fitted the tires in the wrong direction

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Nice Jason, but men call it Salmon not pinkwink.gif Where did you get the tire changing setuo from? Wouldnt mind getting one

 

Remeber when changing the tires to make sure the DIRECTION ARROW is going the right way, I've had it happen twice where a shop fitted the tires in the wrong direction

 

Dead right Oz, actually it aint pink, it's orange... the video is off colour :D

 

Here's the Aus eBay link to the one: http://cgi.ebay.com.au/Multi-Tyre-Changer-and-Bead-Breaker-Rim-Edge-Clamps-/370275736748?pt=AU_Car_Parts_Accessories&hash=item5636275cac

 

but if I had my time again I'd go the extra for a NoMar: http://cgi.ebay.com.au/NoMar-Classic-Model-Motorcycle-Tyre-Changer-/150454218818?pt=AU_Car_Parts_Accessories&hash=item2307c53042

 

But that's just me, considering I'm changing my tyres near every few weeks it would be worth the extra or just get a few more mates to put in.

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Good video Jason,

something I have been wondering though, would it be possible to balance them when their on the bike on paddock stands to save buying a wheel balancing thing?

 

Bobby

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P.p.s. Without this, changing from road tyres to slicks for trackdays would be too cost prohibitive.

Hmmm... this is an interesting consideration I hadn't thought of- being able to change them would allow me to use track tires on the track (D211GPA's) and street tires for the street (Q2's). Do people who have one bike for street and track do this often?

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I heard the dyna beads are pretty good am i wrong? Been wanting to change my own tires for a while but would like someone experianced to show me how first.

 

 

 

I would NEVER, NEVER use that product for a motorcycle.

 

Better to do it right. Balance it the right way.

 

Keep away from the snake oil. I am sure their advertising looks very convincing, but make no mistake, it does not balance the tire. Why would anyone want something rubbing the inside of the tire? That's very unsafe.

 

Yes you may not have an issue at slow speeds, but when you get going you will have issues.

 

End of story.

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P.p.s. Without this, changing from road tyres to slicks for trackdays would be too cost prohibitive.

Hmmm... this is an interesting consideration I hadn't thought of- being able to change them would allow me to use track tires on the track (D211GPA's) and street tires for the street (Q2's). Do people who have one bike for street and track do this often?

 

Yes, this is done for those wanting to go from street to track often.

 

Also some riders will get an extra set of rims and just swap rims.

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Steves already answered you Stevo but I'll add my bike serves multiple purposes, as a race bike, track bike and a commuter. Just takes an hour to pop the other tyres on, good fairings off and the race fairings on.

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