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Grinding The Pegs Without Getting The Knee Down?


Stroker
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ON sport bikes, it is easier to get your knee to the ground because of the way they are designed.On standards it is more difficult and you might scrape the hard parts a bit.On cruisers, you will most certainly grind away the peg feelers before you can get your knee down.

 

Now i don't have knee protection.How do i get the bike at max lean, ie grind the pegs, without getting my knee down?On standards and sportbikes, not cruisers.

 

Do i counter steer but not move my ass off the seat? As in remain in position but lean my body sitting straight, like the tower of Pisa?

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I'm not sure I understand exactly what your asking, With proper, or improper depending on your point of view, body positioning you can drag your Knee on a Goldwing, there are youtube video's to prove it, If your asking how to drag your peg's without touching your knee down cause you don't have knee pucks, just don't stick it out there would be my advice. If your asking how to gauge your lean angle without using your knee as a reference I would ask both why and where are you trying to use max lean angle on your bike ?

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If you see the twist 2 dvd, there are three characters.The pro on the harley and the two noobs on sport bikes.They show how the pro is faster on his cruiser than the noobs because of throttle control.When the pro takes the corners, he grinds the pegs while remaining seated upright and not moving his knees.How do i do that?

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Your simply asking how you scrape the pegs on your bike ?? That's just a matter of using enough lean angle that you run out of ground clearance, that can be done with any kind of body positioning, but I would recommend against riding around intentionally scraping your pegs on every corner as that leaves you very little to zero margin of error or buffer should you need it.

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If you sit upright, you will need less speed to grind your pegs than if you hang off. If you lean out of the corner, you need even less speed to throw sparks. I prefer to use my toes like feelers to inform me how far over I am. IXS have boots with aluminium sliders that extend in under the sole of the boots to make sure you do not grind through them and also you do not need to tilt your foot on the peg like you must on most racing boots in order for the slider to work.

 

Personally, my calves are long, my thighs are short and my flexibility is poor, so I reckon I will not get my knee down unless I fall off. I tried to hang off my GS550 many, many moons ago. And despite scraping both peg, stands, exhaust and engine cover, my knee was more than a foot above the ground. So I simply stopped trying to get the knee down 25 years ago :D

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:huh: The questions in this thread confuse me. I do everything in my power to keep from scraping stuff.

^ this

 

I guess if you simply want to drag your pegs, push the bike under you and keep pushing until the peg touches. I wouldn't do it, but to each their own.

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..........When the pro takes the corners, he grinds the pegs while remaining seated upright and not moving his knees.How do i do that?

 

Just do as the pro in the video did: seat upright on your standard and sports bikes and go faster and faster in a circular trajectory.

 

 

Use an empty parking lot and a small radius, since you will need to go over the speed limit for any public street three of four times.

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One question.How do i learn how to do this? The bikes here make about 15-20 horse and have bad grip and basic suspension.But damn, can he flick a bike.That is precisely what i was asking.How to get to max lean without hanging off, like he did.He did a u-turn in such a small space.How do i do all that he did? Extreme countersteer?

 

Can any of you do what he did?

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One question.How do i learn how to do this? The bikes here make about 15-20 horse and have bad grip and basic suspension.But damn, can he flick a bike.That is precisely what i was asking.How to get to max lean without hanging off, like he did.He did a u-turn in such a small space.How do i do all that he did? Extreme countersteer?

 

Can any of you do what he did?

 

I do that all the time.

 

read the book and view the DVD imho, being capable is not just one skill but a mix of alot of elements being executed in harmony and perfection .

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One question.How do i learn how to do this? The bikes here make about 15-20 horse and have bad grip and basic suspension.But damn, can he flick a bike.That is precisely what i was asking.How to get to max lean without hanging off, like he did.He did a u-turn in such a small space.How do i do all that he did? Extreme countersteer?

 

Can any of you do what he did?

 

http://amgrass.com/

 

http://www.motogymkhana.org/

 

The lean angle depends on the speed and the radius; in the shown case, the slower speed is compensated by reduced radius.

 

For such small turning radius, hanging-off is not the best technique because the bike turns a little more if at full lean: for that reason, most Motogymkhana's beginner riders hang-off on the outside in order to force the bike to lean exaggeratedly.

 

Yes, counter-steering is hard and steering is extreme, since most maneuvers are done at full steer lock, controlling the balance of the bike with throttle and rear brake only.

 

Little HP and grip is OK, one of the rules is that only street tires can be used.

Still, they can compete in the rain.

 

 

Read what Keith Code wrote about leaning on wet asphalt:

 

http://forums.superb...?showtopic=1548

 

Not he, ...........the person in the posted videos is a Japanese girl !!!

 

I practice Motogymkhana, but I am far from being good at it,.............yet............ :)

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Faak, that is impressive!

 

Back in the 80s and 90s, I used to scrape the pegs in the wet on my old standards, but they didn't have the cornering clearance of modern race reps. Also, it's surprising to see that the tyres can take the speed changes and quick steering without flinching. These days, I do not bounce so well and I have this sensation that if I push things, I may fall off. So instead of falling off my speed is reduced. And not just in the wet.

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Damn! And she is a novice!! I must follow this thing closely.I see it as a way to tremendously improve skills with little investment, don't you think? No track required.Just some empty space and a host of skills get worked on.Thank you so much LNew.

 

I don't believe that Motogymkhana could ever be a substitute for track days, high speed riding, track and street racing and the associated proper couching and schooling; they are very different in essence.

 

As stated before, at those low speeds, the radius of turns and the closest distances between two points is way more important than speed; actually, just a little excessive speed messes up the ideal trajectory.

 

Techniques are also different: just observe how the rider moves her upper body to compensate for braking and acceleration and to help standing up the bike more vigorously, while her butt is kept as aft as possible.

 

These videos make it look easy, but believe, it is extremely hard to make the clock show a decent time after an "attack".

 

The set up of the bikes also differs: very deflated tires, higher handlebars and big rear sprockets (to increase acceleration as high speed is not needed).

 

The sport is very new in UK and is taking baby steps in USA; Japanese riders have been practicing this for more than 15 years; reason for which they are so proficient.

 

Finding a proper place that allows practice is also difficult, at least in USA.

I have been kicked out of many empty parking lots by owners concerned about their liability,.............even if nobody is around or I fall on my own.

 

Glad it helped with your question; you are welcome. :)

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Lnewqban, just curious, where did you learn about amgrass?

 

I ride a standard most of the time and I have yet to grind any hard parts. If I grind hard parts on that bike I will probably shortly afterwards stress test the quality of the leathers I am wearing. I don't have chicken strips on the rear and have scraped my right foot going less than 15 mph, being lazy, not raising my foot on the peg, and not realizing how much lean I had dialed in. Needless to say that startled me and I snatched the bike up quick.

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[

 

I guess if you simply want to drag your pegs, push the bike under you and keep pushing until the peg touches. I wouldn't do it, but to each their own.

 

This is a way to do it. If you push the bike down under you (essentially doing the OPPOSITE of hanging off) you can use MORE lean angle for a given speed around a turn, and eventually you will run out of lean angle and scrape the pegs. Or lose traction and fall down.

 

As others have said, use caution here. By INCREASING your lean angle, you are making your suspension work a lot harder, you are asking a lot of your tires, and you are taking a big chance of hitting a hard part and having it lever your rear tire off the ground resulting in a crash. Additionally, if you are aggressive with the throttle while at max lean, you can highside the bike and that is a very nasty way to fall - it can toss you up high and/or the bike can come down on you or slide over you, not pretty. If you are at max lean and hit a bump, or abruptly let off the gas, the suspension can compress and slam the peg or other parts into the pavement and cause a crash. Certainly it is possible to scrape your toes, pegs, even mufflers without crashing but the ODDS of crashing when riding at max lean are a quite a lot higher so please do be careful if you experiment with this, wear plenty of protective gear, make sure you are not riding alone, and ride in a safe area with no cars.

 

If getting comfortable with extreme lean angles is your goal, consider playing around in dirt on a small dirt bike. On those you can push the bike WAY down under you, and they are much less inclined to highside (they would normally just slide out instead), plus you can potentially have a softer surface to land on and no cars to worry about.

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