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Motorcycle Mileage (mpg)


Cobie Fair
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Maybe not a hot cornering topic, but I wonder what kind of mileage the different bikes get, in different applications. My '98 ZX-9 gets 43 when I'm commuting and buzzing around town. Thats's some freeway, some stop and go streets. What do you have, what do you get?

 

Best,

C

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I can get out 110-120 miles on my F4i on the street for about 3.6 gallons between fillups. Since I dont' have exact numbers for MPG I'm not going to do the math on that.

 

I can get a full trackday of 6 session sessions per tank.

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I can get out 110-120 miles on my F4i on the street for about 3.6 gallons between fillups. Since I dont' have exact numbers for MPG I'm not going to do the math on that.

 

I can get a full trackday of 6 session sessions per tank.

 

120 divided by 3.6 is 33.3. That seems really low to me, unless you are a lead foot---you are pinned a lot :)

 

C

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Maybe not a hot cornering topic, but I wonder what kind of mileage the different bikes get, in different applications. My '98 ZX-9 gets 43 when I'm commuting and buzzing around town. Thats's some freeway, some stop and go streets. What do you have, what do you get?

 

Best,

C

 

On my 02 CBR600F4i I get 47mpg on 87 octane gas during normal commuting, which is mostly highway cruising at about 70 mph.

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On the street, I do mostly highway miles commuting to work, and get 120 miles per 3.5 gallons. On the track I get about 80-90 miles per tank. I was going to try -1 up front, but was told that it would change my MPG too much. I commute more than I track, so it wouldn't be worth it. At the track today I was told that it's about a 5 miles per tank difference.

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Maybe not a hot cornering topic, but I wonder what kind of mileage the different bikes get, in different applications. My '98 ZX-9 gets 43 when I'm commuting and buzzing around town. Thats's some freeway, some stop and go streets. What do you have, what do you get?

 

Best,

C

 

On my 02 CBR600F4i I get 47mpg on 87 octane gas during normal commuting, which is mostly highway cruising at about 70 mph.

 

47 sounds about right--anyone out there with a twin, doing better than that?

 

CF

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With my 05 r6, I vary between 35 to 45 mpg. The 35 happens when I'm consistently making short 1-3 mile trips with warm up. I average 45 when commuting.

 

Makes sense.

 

Now, any SV riders out there that have done better, or 650 Ninja? We have one at the school that is the brake bike, but never had the thing on the street. I think it would be an excellent commuter, and fun to ride.

 

CF

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this may interest you, my CBR600RR vs my friends Ducati 1098!

When we went to Rockingham this year for the california superbike school, we had a 500 mile ride to get there, roughly 100 miles of twisties and 400 miles of horrible tyre squaring motorway, By the time we done the twisties we filled up and both used roughly the same, On the motorway however the Ducati's fuel consumption was far superior to my Honda's, whenever we stopped to fill up roughly every 100 to 120 miles my Honda would take about 1.5 litres more than the Ducati to fill up! I thought this must have been caused by my 600cc engine having to sit at a constant 7000 revs whereas his big twin 1098 was probably only at a constant 3500 revs to sit at the same speed as me! I am getting about 40 mpg roughly but my bike is tuned with a pc3 and setup on a dyno, Here in the UK we dont have 87 octane, only 95 and shell sell 100 0ctane fuel but 87 sounds really low! I would have thought that a higher octane fuel would give better consumption!

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this may interest you, my CBR600RR vs my friends Ducati 1098!

When we went to Rockingham this year for the california superbike school, we had a 500 mile ride to get there, roughly 100 miles of twisties and 400 miles of horrible tyre squaring motorway, By the time we done the twisties we filled up and both used roughly the same, On the motorway however the Ducati's fuel consumption was far superior to my Honda's, whenever we stopped to fill up roughly every 100 to 120 miles my Honda would take about 1.5 litres more than the Ducati to fill up! I thought this must have been caused by my 600cc engine having to sit at a constant 7000 revs whereas his big twin 1098 was probably only at a constant 3500 revs to sit at the same speed as me! I am getting about 40 mpg roughly but my bike is tuned with a pc3 and setup on a dyno, Here in the UK we dont have 87 octane, only 95 and shell sell 100 0ctane fuel but 87 sounds really low! I would have thought that a higher octane fuel would give better consumption!

 

That's an interesting comparison. Sounds like that 1098 gets awesome gas mileage. Do you know what your friend's gas mileage was?

 

On the gas issue, the US uses RON+MON/2 for our octane rating. I'm not sure what's used in Europe, but maybe the rating difference could just be from different standards. However, higher octane fuel won't give better fuel consumption. Fuel is regulated by your fuel mapping. Octane is merely resistance to detonation so that the fuel doesn't combust before the spark.

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Ace--it would be good to find out what your friend's mileage is--wanna ask him?

 

I've heard of good mileage coming out of twins, like to get some specifics.

 

CF

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  • 4 weeks later...

I had a 2001 yzf600r, it got at least 50 in normal riding, around town commuting or spirited backroad riding. It occasionally got up to 60 mpg if I did a lot of easy cruis'n. it never got less than 50 except on the track. This bike had carbs. I sold it with 67000 miles on the odometer and it was still getting the same mpg. I really wonder what it takes to actually wear out these sportbike motors.

 

Now I have a 2006 gsxr600. For the first several thousand miles I put on it, I got 38mpg, sometimes up to 42. My friend got a 2008 gsxr600, and he was getting 49mpg. I asked him what kind of gears he was using and it was clear that he was consistently using higher gears and lower revs while street riding. I did the same and now I get around 48 to 49 mpg consistently. So it appears the gears you choose can save you some money. Most of the time now I'm riding between 4k to 5k rpms and am in 6th by the time I get to 50mph. Sounds like a boring way to ride, but I shift to the fun gears in short spurts on the curvy sections. :D

 

My KLR650, all loaded up with 2 people and luggage, and riding on jeep trails, gets 50mpg... but it doesn't go very fast.

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This bike looks like it'd be really fun:

http://www.yamaha-motor.com/sport/products...596/0/home.aspx

And Yami seems to be emphasizing its claimed 71mpg.

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My bikes, current and former.675= around 45 mpg.Hypermotard= 44mpg and that was really trying to eek it out.V-Strom 650= 55mpg, awesome commuter bike.'02 SV650S, pipe and jetted= 40mpg.

 

I figured the SV would do better than that, but the Yamaha is impressive, but they are claimed numbers, so the winner so far....sounds like the YZF600 at 60.

 

C

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This bike looks like it'd be really fun:

http://www.yamaha-motor.com/sport/products...596/0/home.aspx

 

Yeah it does.

 

A WR for the street, eh? Yamaha's answer to the KLX250SF? http://www.kawasaki.com/Products/product-s...ons.aspx?id=370

 

From what I've read about it, it's a detuned 1/4 YZF-R1 engine. The bore x stroke is much more oversquare than the KLX with the same YZF piston (I think). And the reduced compression is still almost 12:1. With the EXUP exhaust/ignition and variable intake, it should run like a raped date on race gas with a few tweaks. From what I hear, it makes WAY more horsepower than the KLX straight out of the box. Like 50% more! (And weighs about the same as the Aprilia RS125!) Of course, horsepower isn't free. With all those extra hi-tech bits, the MSRP is almost $1000 more than the KLX, too. And over $2000 more than the '09 250 Ninja.

 

I accidentally erased the other half of this post, but, it was something like:

 

"Kawasaki hasn't released any estimated MPG for the KLX, but, everyone says it should be great."

 

And, I can't remember the rest... darn.

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This bike looks like it'd be really fun:

http://www.yamaha-motor.com/sport/products...596/0/home.aspx

 

Yeah it does.

 

A WR for the street, eh? Yamaha's answer to the KLX250SF? http://www.kawasaki.com/Products/product-s...ons.aspx?id=370

 

From what I've read about it, it's a detuned 1/4 YZF-R1 engine.

It's a 250 dude.

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It's a 250 dude.

Yeah, that's true. Hence, the name: WR250.

 

Was there something more you wished to add?

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The last street bikes I rode were a GPz750 and a 440LTD. Both averaged around 55 mpg. The 440 maybe closer to 60 mpg.

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It's a 250 dude.

Yeah, that's true. Hence, the name: WR250.

 

Was there something more you wished to add?

Sorry, just pointing out that the R-1 is 1000cc and the WR250 is 250cc, therefore the engines have no similarity.

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It's a 250 dude.

Yeah, that's true. Hence, the name: WR250.

 

Was there something more you wished to add?

Sorry, just pointing out that the R-1 is 1000cc and the WR250 is 250cc, therefore the engines have no similarity.

 

Do you know what "1/4" means? It's called a "fraction". It can also be called a ratio or used to symbolize mathematical division. But, in this case, it means one out of four. So...

 

"The WR250 motor is 1/4 of a YZF-R1 motor" means one cylinder out of four or "one quarter" of a YZF-R1 1000cc motor.

 

1/4 of 1000 = 250.

 

Get it?

 

I don't know if the new R1 has Titanium intake valves, and I'm guessing the cam timing is a little different, but, the measurements, the bore, the stroke, the ports, the piston, the direct ignition coil, etc etc etc are exactly the same as an R1. Hence, the WR250 motor is 1/4 of a YZF-R1 motor.

 

The similarities are, in a word, major.

 

r

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It's a 250 dude.

Yeah, that's true. Hence, the name: WR250.

 

Was there something more you wished to add?

Sorry, just pointing out that the R-1 is 1000cc and the WR250 is 250cc, therefore the engines have no similarity.

 

Do you know what "1/4" means? It's called a "fraction". It can also be called a ratio or used to symbolize mathematical division. But, in this case, it means one out of four. So...

 

"The WR250 motor is 1/4 of a YZF-R1 motor" means one cylinder out of four or "one quarter" of a YZF-R1 1000cc motor.

 

1/4 of 1000 = 250.

 

Get it?

 

I don't know if the new R1 has Titanium intake valves, and I'm guessing the cam timing is a little different, but, the measurements, the bore, the stroke, the ports, the piston, the direct ignition coil, etc etc etc are exactly the same as an R1. Hence, the WR250 motor is 1/4 of a YZF-R1 motor.

 

The similarities are, in a word, major.

 

r

Ha ha ha ha....that was pretty clever of you. But good try though. (I got the email) Hilarious.

I would call you out, but I'm going to leave it alone and just enjoy the laughter.

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