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Read Any Good Books Lately?


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I was just reading Cobie's thread on things we do to prepare to ride or race and there was a book mentioned in one of the replies (The Upper Half of the Motorcycle: On the Unity of Rider and Machine by Bernt Spiegel). I wasn't familiar with that one and it made me think that maybe some of us have books we would like to recommend.

 

I'd be surprised if anyone found their way to this forum without being familiar with Keith's books, and probably a few others like: "Sport Riding Techniques" by Nick Ienatsch, "Total Control" by Lee Parks, or even more general riding books like "Proficient Motorcycling" by David Hough. However maybe you've read something less well known, or not even instructional. Maybe it was just a well written fiction that you enjoyed.

 

It doesn't even have to be a book, Hunter S Thompson's "Song of the Sausage Creature" was an article written for Cycle World back in the mid-90's and it's still one of my favorites (PM me if you are interested and I'll email it to you if you cant find it)

 

So if you've read something interesting, post up. It's cold outside and I need a motorcycle fix.

 

Ride safe,

Carey

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Hi Carey,

 

The two books that have really stuck with me this year are Lorenzo, (my story so far), and one I'm in the middle of right now is Lance Armstrong, (its not about the bike, my journey back to life)

Lorenzo, you see this guy was always going to be a champion from a very young age, its interesting to read about his route to moto gp, and the sacrifices he had to make to become number one!

Lance Armstrong, I know there's a bit of controversy surrounding this guy at the moment but from what Ive read of his book its very inspiring, about no matter what challenges he faced in life he takes them head on, thriving to be the best he can be!

 

Two books I'd suggest anyway!

 

Bobby

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...The two books that have really stuck with me this year are Lorenzo, (my story so far), and one I'm in the middle of right now is Lance Armstrong, (its not about the bike, my journey back to life)...

 

Thanks Bobby. I had thought about Lorenzo's book but you are the first person to tell me what they thought. I'll have to put it in the queue!

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Hunter S Thompson represents the sort of people I really cannot stand in any kind or way. Nor as a person/personality or the rubbish he wrote. But we're all different and what's right for me can be wrong for you - and vice verse.

 

I'm currently reading two books of Kevin Cameron; The Grand Prix Motorcycle and The Sportbike Performance Handbook 2nd edition. Especially the latter should offer a great supplement to Keith Code's TWOT books as well as Nick Ienatch' book mentioned above. It gives a lot of basic information that's readily accessible for everybody without going into details that will only be of interest to the limited few.

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I'm currently reading two books of Kevin Cameron; The Grand Prix Motorcycle and The Sportbike Performance Handbook 2nd edition. Especially the latter should offer a great supplement to Keith Code's TWOT books as well as Nick Ienatch' book mentioned above. It gives a lot of basic information that's readily accessible for everybody without going into details that will only be of interest to the limited few.

FWIW: I didn't find much difference between the 1st and 2nd edition of Sportsbike Performance Handbook. But yes, definitely an interesting read.

 

I found Valentino Rossi' autobiography What If I Had Never Tried It? interesting, although I sense some one-sidedness in it (but not worse than can be expected).

 

Kai

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FWIW: I didn't find much difference between the 1st and 2nd edition of Sportsbike Performance Handbook. But yes, definitely an interesting read.

 

I found Valentino Rossi' autobiography What If I Had Never Tried It? interesting, although I sense some one-sidedness in it (but not worse than can be expected).

 

Kai

 

The topics are the same, but the 2nd edition does take into account the big gains in technology over the past decade.

 

I also liked Rossi's book B)

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Good thread guys, some books I hadn't read. I've read one of Lance's (honestly can't recall the title), he's quite a fellow.

 

CF

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Lance Amstrong "it's not about the bike" was indeed a very inspring read. I would recommend to anyone.

I just started to read "Open" by Andre Agassi; I am not a tennis player but I find it a very interesting read so far. Pretty amazing to learn about the sacrifices that Top Athlete must go through.

Even if you are not a runner I highly recommend "Born to Run". I read it twice! it is an amazing story.

I just finished "the monk that sold his Ferrari" (it's about finding the true meaning of life and so on) and I was quite dissapointed...

I don't count how many times I have read the Twist II book... :)

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Bit slow in posting but I have a few worth a mention.

 

1. A Fortunate Life by Albert Facey. The book is a bit older now but is absolutely fascinating. An auto-biography, the man was born early 1900's, never had any formal schooling, tought himself to read and write, was sent off to work as a farm hand at the age of 8, only to be beaten and abused by druken farmers. At age 16 enlisted in the Army to go off an fight in WW1, fought at Gallipoli, lost mates and brothers and was injured himself. When he returned to be shunned by the public, couldn't find decent work so in the end went back to farming etc. Dont want to summarise the whole thing but after living through two world wars, the great depression and more problematic life situations one can imagine he still on reflects on his life as fortunate. It is based in a different time and a different world but it is just so fascinating and inspirational.

 

Highly recommend for anyone looking for an inspirational read.

 

2. A sports one, Full Circle by John Maclean. As a sports mad teenager looking for a career as a professional Rugby League Player he was hit by a Truck while riding his pushbike and made a paraplegic. Went on to be the first paraplegic to compete in and complete the Hawaiian Iron Man, he swum the English Channel and Won a silver medal in Rowing at the paralympics in Beijing. Not only the sacrifices this man made to recover from his injuries but to then punish himself to the limits he has is incredible.

 

Again highly recommended.

 

3. Barry Sheen by Michael Scott. Great Book, Great Photos, very easy reading, enough said.

 

Have been meaning to get into Lance's books but been distracted reading Keiths over and over again.

 

Hope I didn't rant to much.

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  • 1 month later...

Waking this thread up cause it's a good topic. My pleasure reading is usually reference reading, sadly enough. :huh:

 

I'm floating between many reference reads.

 

Race Tech's Motorcycle Suspension Bible - Good reference for understanding the workings of suspension.

Service Manuals for my two ZX-6R's

A handful of engine building, rotating assemblies, porting and tuning references (mostly car related).

 

I've been focusing a lot on mechanical related materials. My goal is to make it so NO ONE touches my girls! :lol:

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Motorcycle Dynamics - Vittore Cossalter

This is the premier book on the physics of a motorcycle. If you can read this and understand it, you won't need to ask anymore questions.

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Modern Motorcycle Technology. I don't (didn't) know anything about motorcycle engines, honestly. But after reading this book I have a much, much better knowledge of my bike. I'm definitely going to read it a couple more times.

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Modern Motorcycle Technology. I don't (didn't) know anything about motorcycle engines, honestly. But after reading this book I have a much, much better knowledge of my bike. I'm definitely going to read it a couple more times.

 

You mean the one by Edward Abdo? I've seen it on Amazon but not in a store and that's one darn expensive book for not being able to check it out first. So, it's good?

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Modern Motorcycle Technology. I don't (didn't) know anything about motorcycle engines, honestly. But after reading this book I have a much, much better knowledge of my bike. I'm definitely going to read it a couple more times.

 

You mean the one by Edward Abdo? I've seen it on Amazon but not in a store and that's one darn expensive book for not being able to check it out first. So, it's good?

 

Man is that expensive. It's the one by Massimo Clarke. A lot cheaper.

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I recently finished up on both RaceTech's Motorcycle Suspension Bible (this year) as well as Andrew Trevitt's Sportbike Suspension Tuning (fall of last year). While the Racetech bible actually explained what's going on with the squat/anti-squat (thanks to the excellent diagrams), I found a very large overlap between the two books. I was also kinda unimpressed by the fact that more than half of the pages are dedicated to pictural howto-guides on changing oil and gas on fronts and rears. If you need/want that, by all means dive into it - otherwise, I'd go with the Trevitt book.

 

Kai

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

I'm new here but, as I sit in my office (its my business so I get to choose what's on the shelves!) I have loads of motorcycle books in view including every motocourse back to 1991 and the book I'd recommend is 'Ring of Fire' by Rick Broadbent and The Fast Stuff by Mat Oxley. Both are excellent books with Ring of Fire giving an interesting insight into MotoGp.

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