Jump to content

Nailed It!


stuman
 Share

Recommended Posts

How do you know that you just nailed it! You know what I mean, just after completing a turn you get that feeling like, hey that was pretty good!

 

What tells you that you got the turn right?

 

 

for me its when i can almost fall asleep in a corner..meaning effortless...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

How do you know that you just nailed it! You know what I mean, just after completing a turn you get that feeling like, hey that was pretty good!

 

What tells you that you got the turn right?

 

For me it is the feeling of the drive coming out of the turn. The drive feels so much stronger and the corner also feels effortless when I nail it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Good question. When I have the corner entry speed and mid-corner speed I want, coupled with a good drive (in other words I don't get too greedy with entry/mid to the point the exit is muffed), and I'm pushing the bike/tire/asphalt combo.

 

For street riding, it's different, it would be more if I executed a turn technically well.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I understand the question of that nailed it feeling but find it hard to put into words!

I am a big fan of the twist books so to take a turn by the book gives me that nailed it feeling!

Good entry speed is critical, combined with a fast assertive quickturn, then immediately crack the throttle and begin to roll on, apex then pickup drill, by this point I want to feel the rear tyre working for grip and be on full throttle just before the bike is upright!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I was doing a track that I have ridden frequently, and somehow figured that there is a turn that I was making way too slow for myself. I always got good drive out, but the faster riders would smoke me through it. I kept working on it, and working on it, changing my RP and my entry point. I hit it one time, and got tingly from how fast I could whip through it, and quite a few times after that just got excited that I could keep up with the faster riders through this whole section.

I remember going over the rumble strips that lead into the next corner for the first time and thinking BINGO!!! I knew I nailed that corner, and still shutter when I think about the speed I can carry through there.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I know I've nailed it primarily through the sense of stability through the turn. I also know when I did't do anything stupid to induce a SR throughout and I've followed TC Rule#1 and Steering Rule #1.

 

The indicators of hitting rumble strips on exit, smoking someone, spinning and sliding all feel good but they can deceptively come from poor technique as well.

 

What gives a rider that inner smile? How do we know that we are patting ourselves on the back for duplicating "wrong"?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

How do you know that you just nailed it! You know what I mean, just after completing a turn you get that feeling like, hey that was pretty good!

 

What tells you that you got the turn right?

 

 

To me it almost feels like it was in slow motion....The entrance looked huge and the exit was effortless. That's why I think the eyes are the most important thing to work on in my riding.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

How do you know that you just nailed it! You know what I mean, just after completing a turn you get that feeling like, hey that was pretty good!

 

What tells you that you got the turn right?

 

 

To me it almost feels like it was in slow motion....The entrance looked huge and the exit was effortless. That's why I think the eyes are the most important thing to work on in my riding.

 

Wouldn't disagree with you on that point, espeically after some of the key points are mastered/known, like how to stabilize the bike. Pretty much the whole of level 2 is about that.

 

CF

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 years later...

Today I went back to my roots, so to speak. When I first started riding, on 200 lb 100cc bikes, I used to ride straigth as long as possible and just flick the bike on its side. Nobody had instructed me to do this, it just felt natural. And it allowed me to see further around blind corner.

 

After two years of riding I went from a Honda CB100 to a CX500, a bike that needed lots of force to turn rapidly. It also had more power. So my "style" changed to either use rounder lines due to needing more time and distance to change direction, or to brake hard and late, make the corner short and fire out again. This was mostly the way I rode until 2005, when I worked on braking earlier and getting on the throttle sooner. This is the way my brother used to ride always. He's also suffered lots of front end slides, and now I do too. If not lots, at least far more often than when I turned in on a bit of brakes.

 

However, today I began the quick flick thing again when riding my old Honda VT500 Ascot. I did it even around shallow corners where I used little lean. I stayed upright much longer than usual and used just one quick steering input to bring the bike rapidly down to the desired lean angle. The really nice discovery was that the bike was more stable and held its line perfectly without further input. I know it's described in Code's books, but it was good to experience it (again) for myself.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Today I went back to my roots, so to speak. When I first started riding, on 200 lb 100cc bikes, I used to ride straigth as long as possible and just flick the bike on its side. Nobody had instructed me to do this, it just felt natural. And it allowed me to see further around blind corner.

 

After two years of riding I went from a Honda CB100 to a CX500, a bike that needed lots of force to turn rapidly. It also had more power. So my "style" changed to either use rounder lines due to needing more time and distance to change direction, or to brake hard and late, make the corner short and fire out again. This was mostly the way I rode until 2005, when I worked on braking earlier and getting on the throttle sooner. This is the way my brother used to ride always. He's also suffered lots of front end slides, and now I do too. If not lots, at least far more often than when I turned in on a bit of brakes.

 

However, today I began the quick flick thing again when riding my old Honda VT500 Ascot. I did it even around shallow corners where I used little lean. I stayed upright much longer than usual and used just one quick steering input to bring the bike rapidly down to the desired lean angle. The really nice discovery was that the bike was more stable and held its line perfectly without further input. I know it's described in Code's books, but it was good to experience it (again) for myself.

 

Good to hear!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The really nice discovery was that the bike was more stable and held its line perfectly without further input.

 

This is something I've been struggling with lately. Once turned in I know you are supposed to release pressure and the bike will hold its line. I think that this has worked on all my other bikes but my current one, Aprilia Shiver, wants to stand up as soon as I release pressure from the bar. I discussed it when I did level 1 and Glen said some bikes are like that and gave the example of the Ducati Diavel.

 

My question is: Is there a way to work out whether it is a handling characteristic of my bike or a problem with the squidgy bit on top of the seat (me)? Adding throttle as per TC#1 seems to help, I think, but the area where I notice it most is going downhill. This is really noticeable for me as I live on a large steep hill and have to negotiate all the turns through the estate every time I go out. It feels like when I release the pressure on the inside bar that it starts coming back towards me and doesn't want to stop until I apply more pressure to hold it in its tracks.

 

Does anyone have any ideas?

 

 

Thanks,

Dae.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The really nice discovery was that the bike was more stable and held its line perfectly without further input.

 

This is something I've been struggling with lately. Once turned in I know you are supposed to release pressure and the bike will hold its line. I think that this has worked on all my other bikes but my current one, Aprilia Shiver, wants to stand up as soon as I release pressure from the bar. I discussed it when I did level 1 and Glen said some bikes are like that and gave the example of the Ducati Diavel.

 

My question is: Is there a way to work out whether it is a handling characteristic of my bike or a problem with the squidgy bit on top of the seat (me)? Adding throttle as per TC#1 seems to help, I think, but the area where I notice it most is going downhill. This is really noticeable for me as I live on a large steep hill and have to negotiate all the turns through the estate every time I go out. It feels like when I release the pressure on the inside bar that it starts coming back towards me and doesn't want to stop until I apply more pressure to hold it in its tracks.

 

Does anyone have any ideas?

 

 

Thanks,

Dae.

 

Does it hold a line when on the flat, and with the throttle rolling on? Does it just do this going downhill and what is happening with the throttle at that time?

 

CF

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The really nice discovery was that the bike was more stable and held its line perfectly without further input.

 

This is something I've been struggling with lately. Once turned in I know you are supposed to release pressure and the bike will hold its line. I think that this has worked on all my other bikes but my current one, Aprilia Shiver, wants to stand up as soon as I release pressure from the bar. I discussed it when I did level 1 and Glen said some bikes are like that and gave the example of the Ducati Diavel.

 

My question is: Is there a way to work out whether it is a handling characteristic of my bike or a problem with the squidgy bit on top of the seat (me)? Adding throttle as per TC#1 seems to help, I think, but the area where I notice it most is going downhill. This is really noticeable for me as I live on a large steep hill and have to negotiate all the turns through the estate every time I go out. It feels like when I release the pressure on the inside bar that it starts coming back towards me and doesn't want to stop until I apply more pressure to hold it in its tracks.

 

Does anyone have any ideas?

 

 

Thanks,

Dae.

 

Does it hold a line when on the flat, and with the throttle rolling on? Does it just do this going downhill and what is happening with the throttle at that time?

 

CF

 

I'll have to double check on the way home tonight (all up hill going home). I think it's only when going downhill. It also seems to be at lower speeds (sub 30 mph). When riding in to work this morning I did some playing around and it definitely seems to be the lower speed stuff. Opening the throttle seems to help but not completely eradicate it up to about 25-30mph. Above this speed the throttle seems to remove it in its entirety. The feeling is that the inside bar is coming towards me and it just keeps on coming until I resist it. I seems that if I didn't resist and stop it the bar would keep on coming towards me until it hit the lock stop (or I fell off since I was turning far tighter than the corner!).

 

Does that help?

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

running waaay faster than the big guys in a turn. like 125 4T scooter VS 600 / litrebike territory.

You know u nailed it right when its definitely rider ability bottlenecking that beast of a bike on the same turn....

 

by their standards i have a sh*tty bike , by my standards they have sh*tty abilities.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

by their standards i have a sh*tty bike , by my standards they have sh*tty abilities.

 

laugh.gif

 

I like it. biggrin.gif

 

But to be fair, being on a lighter machine you will have a larger safety margin for a given speed... but I know what you're saying.

 

How to know when you nailed a corner... I did that while attending CSS Level 1 earlier this week. Only did it once the entire day, in fact it is probably the only time I've done it in my entire life... but I had turned in and was on the throttle, then hit my apex and it just felt good, I thought "perfect!". Kept the throttle on all the way out of the turn without running wide on the exit, the next corner linked together perfectly as well and I just did it all again. Two perfect corners in a row... you know it when you do it!

 

If I had to define it, I would say that you really nailed it when you only make one steering input, open the throttle smoothly and without hesitation, make your apex, and hold your line on the exit. You can't ask for any more than that, right? biggrin.gif

Link to comment
Share on other sites

by their standards i have a sh*tty bike , by my standards they have sh*tty abilities.

 

laugh.gif

 

I like it. biggrin.gif

 

But to be fair, being on a lighter machine you will have a larger safety margin for a given speed... but I know what you're saying.

 

How to know when you nailed a corner... I did that while attending CSS Level 1 earlier this week. Only did it once the entire day, in fact it is probably the only time I've done it in my entire life... but I had turned in and was on the throttle, then hit my apex and it just felt good, I thought "perfect!". Kept the throttle on all the way out of the turn without running wide on the exit, the next corner linked together perfectly as well and I just did it all again. Two perfect corners in a row... you know it when you do it!

 

If I had to define it, I would say that you really nailed it when you only make one steering input, open the throttle smoothly and without hesitation, make your apex, and hold your line on the exit. You can't ask for any more than that, right? biggrin.gif

 

I could always ask for better road quality around my woods... :P

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...